The Life and Death of Colonel Blimp - Movie Reviews - Rotten Tomatoes

The Life and Death of Colonel Blimp Reviews

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July 23, 2016
Among the finest English films ever made, The Life and Death Of Colonel Blimp is like a rose without thorns, beautiful, but stands out among its colleagues. Clive Candy's obsession with Edith brings to mind Scottie's obsession with Madeline in Vertigo, and the following of a character from being a young European soldier to manhood brings Barry Lyndon to mind. The film is brilliant as a black comedy, but also provides social commentary relevant even in the present day.
July 13, 2016
This impressive and sweeping epic is about Colonel Clive Candy, and his amazing life through several wars and friendships. Its satirical in nature and wasn't liked at its time of release, but its a well made political satire and movie about friendship and the changing times. The performances are wonderful and its an interesting film for sure.
July 3, 2016
An epic comedy drama about the life of a soldier. I found it quite boring and it couldn't really keep my attention. I think that if it wasn't for this film, we may not have had Dad's Army though.
½ June 1, 2016
It is World War 2 and Major General Clive Wynn-Candy is a senior officer in the Home Guard. He seems the stereotypical English General - old-fashioned, play by the rules, and drastically out of touch. Through flashbacks we see his Army career, from its early days onwards, and it wasn't always so.

Wonderful, interesting, moving movie. The life of a military officer, his loves, regrets, how the times change around him, and how he adapts to them, or not. The movie starts rather frenetically, which was off-putting, but once it settles down it is a wonderful movie.

Roger Livesey is great in the lead role, but it is the amazingly beautiful Deborah Kerr (in three roles) who steals the show.
May 26, 2016
The film follows this British soldier from his prime into his plump old age, yet it depicts him as ever the sentimentalist, ever the dreamer, and ever capable of love and compassion.
March 6, 2016
Not only is The Life and Death of Colonel Blimp one of the most complex, nuanced, and best Powell/Pressburger films that they made, but it is also one of the finest films ever made period.
½ November 22, 2014
It's extremely British and clearly made during WW2. But with that said, the expected anti-German propaganda is really subdued and often Powell and Pressburger aim to humanize the "enemies". A lot of these narrative choices and also a lot of the stylistic choices seem 20 years ahead of their time.
July 14, 2014
Amazing this was released during wartime! It's long and sometimes slow, but won me over by the end. Roger Livesey's performance is remarkable.
March 19, 2014
Powell and Pressburger's remarkably modern war epic is a peculiarly acted comedy of manners and satire of British traditionalism which delicately reveals the horrible truth of modern warfare with grace and humor. It amounts to one of the greatest achievements not only in the director and screenwriter duo's careers, but in British cinema.
January 28, 2014
This is the indescribable classic of British cinema. You have either seen it or you haven't. If you have, you either comprehend this is the most wonderful piece of cinema that has ever been produced or you don't. If you belong to the former you are likely to be a very insightful human being! It's beautiful to watch. Complex, witty, wise. Explains much about the human condition, love, the nature of war and British society amongst other things. It astounds me that such a work of art could ever have been conceived.
½ January 1, 2014
Another great film from Pressburger and Powell. The performance is fantastic and the heart-breaking story of Clive Candy is so well handled and played. A great satire.
Super Reviewer
½ December 26, 2013
Often considered one of the greatest British films of all time, The Life and Death of Colonel Blimp tells the story of Clive Candy over the course of four decades. The film captures numerous British sensibilities and traditions as well as a look into the country's past and it's citizens during wartime. The film is a deep and complex character study and one that while slowly paced tells a nuanced and moving story.
December 5, 2013
My Favorite Film Is 1941's Citizen Kane.
November 14, 2013
Beautifully shot, colorful saga of a military figure losing a touch he might never have had.
October 20, 2013
If anybody I know from Facebook ever listens to a single thing I say via Rotten Tomatoes, let it be the following;
WATCH THIS MOVIE. Yeah, it's from the 40s, but even the anti-B&W crowd can't complain here; they whipped out the Technicolor. Gorgeous. Righteous.
½ September 27, 2013
I liked it, but I think it's about half an hour too long. It could have been tightened here and there. The story is the best thing here, the direction is really nothing too amazing considering it's P&P, but it's a good enough ride and Livesy is relentlessly charming, as ever. The Kerr idea is pretty cleverly executed because it could have been really clumsy, but thankfully she was a talent enough not to put in the same performance three times in different outfits! Anton Walbrook is probably the most compelling of the bunch, though. There's just something about his performance that captivates. The message provides an interesting take on Anglo-German relations and makes the film an interesting historical document as well.
August 14, 2013
Beautifully shot -- the sets are amazing. I miss those old Hollywood sound stage sets!
August 13, 2013
The British cousin of Grand Illusion, and maybe not *as* 'best-film-ever' in status, but it has an epic quality and a sheerly entertaining aim: make this man who is cordial, intelligent and from a certain place and time appealing to as many people as possible, and try some cinematic tricks in the process (the duel scene, which had me at first disappointed we didn't see it but then oh so glad it wasn't there, that this chance was taken to show the build-up and go for the unconventional route of the character of the duel's protocols as opposed to the action itself, same thing with the animal heads on the walls practically SHOTGUNNED onto the walls but without the hunting - in other words, it's Tarantino's upper-crust London grandfathers showing what a jolly good show can be done with wonderous tricks).

But at the same time, like Renoir, they are critical in just the mannerisms and what goes on in those little moments of those in military. Full review to come, but suffice it to say this s a VERY British film, and damn proud of it good sir, may we have some tea?
August 7, 2013
This is my first Powell & Pressburger film that I watched. On top of that, I watched the Criterion edition of the film which had interview with Martin Scorsese and Thelma Schoonmaker who go on to explain several unique features of the film. As well as the influence that the film had on Raging Bull, including the acting of Robert deNiro. I thought the film was interesting but dragged on a bit too long. But I highly recumbent the Criterion edition if for no other reason then for the interviews.
½ July 1, 2013
4.5: I can't believe it's taken me this long to see it. It did not disappoint although I may actually like The Red Shoes more. I feel like this is one of those films that will grow on me over time though. It is truly epic in every sense of the word. I have the sense that it has and will help define what it meant to be in the British military from the turn of the century up until WWII. The performances, cast, sets, locations, plot, etc are incredible as is the Technicolor of course. In that sense I'm glad I waited to see it for the first time on Blu-Ray. Too bad I didn't have this along with me in Djibouti when Col Dennis asked me for film recommendations to show to the American Colonels on movie night. This should be essential viewing for anyone interested in the history of the British military.
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