The Life and Death of Colonel Blimp Reviews

  • Sep 03, 2018

    This is an OK film which runs up to nearly 3 hours, it's a bit like 'Forrest Gump' or that ilk of movie, if you don't buy into the central character (which I almost never do) then you're going to be in for a hard time. Ultimately 3 hours is a long time to spend with anyone, especially someone you couldn't care less what happens to them.

    This is an OK film which runs up to nearly 3 hours, it's a bit like 'Forrest Gump' or that ilk of movie, if you don't buy into the central character (which I almost never do) then you're going to be in for a hard time. Ultimately 3 hours is a long time to spend with anyone, especially someone you couldn't care less what happens to them.

  • May 23, 2018

    For a British Technicolour film made during WWII; this masterpiece certainly makes a great stand in the history of British cinema. Roger Livesey is definitely suited to the role of Clive Candy; an army figure based on David Low's 'Colonel Blimp'. The use of make-up during the WWII scenes most certainly depicts the 'Colonel Blimp' stereotype. The 40-year period involved provides a clear understanding of Candy's belief in common army tradition which is defied by other armies in WWII. Deborah Kerr definitely makes her mark in this film by portraying three different characters; each living in different stages during the 40-year span. This method is effective in maintaining the romantic theme because their influences has a great effect on Candy's life. Now the fact that Winston Churchill wanted this film banned upon release in 1943 makes this film all the more unique; especially as Anton Walbrook's character makes his mark as a German officer who at first rivals Candy, then eventually befriends him for life (despite an initial bitterness during and after WWI); especially when he moves to England from home to reconcile with Candy and support him in maintaining his leadership skills. To sum up; this film has great cinematography, a wonderful storyline combining romance, war and comedy; and most of all relatable characters. A good starter for those who have never seen a film directed by Powell & Pressburger.

    For a British Technicolour film made during WWII; this masterpiece certainly makes a great stand in the history of British cinema. Roger Livesey is definitely suited to the role of Clive Candy; an army figure based on David Low's 'Colonel Blimp'. The use of make-up during the WWII scenes most certainly depicts the 'Colonel Blimp' stereotype. The 40-year period involved provides a clear understanding of Candy's belief in common army tradition which is defied by other armies in WWII. Deborah Kerr definitely makes her mark in this film by portraying three different characters; each living in different stages during the 40-year span. This method is effective in maintaining the romantic theme because their influences has a great effect on Candy's life. Now the fact that Winston Churchill wanted this film banned upon release in 1943 makes this film all the more unique; especially as Anton Walbrook's character makes his mark as a German officer who at first rivals Candy, then eventually befriends him for life (despite an initial bitterness during and after WWI); especially when he moves to England from home to reconcile with Candy and support him in maintaining his leadership skills. To sum up; this film has great cinematography, a wonderful storyline combining romance, war and comedy; and most of all relatable characters. A good starter for those who have never seen a film directed by Powell & Pressburger.

  • Jan 29, 2018

    This is absolutely fascinating as a historical and historiographical document, if quite a jarring watch by modern standards. The themes of changing military codes, the solipsistic way the young see the old, and romantic regrets, are beautifully expressed. The performances are very good, especially Deborah Kerr who portrays three linked but distinct roles, and Anton Walbrook as a 'good' German (which must have been quite striking in the middle of WW2). Altogether impressive and worthwhile.

    This is absolutely fascinating as a historical and historiographical document, if quite a jarring watch by modern standards. The themes of changing military codes, the solipsistic way the young see the old, and romantic regrets, are beautifully expressed. The performances are very good, especially Deborah Kerr who portrays three linked but distinct roles, and Anton Walbrook as a 'good' German (which must have been quite striking in the middle of WW2). Altogether impressive and worthwhile.

  • Jul 13, 2017

    A fantastic exploration of the career of an old general and a fascinating critique on the older British upper class that made the mistakes that led to World War 2. A well made, well acted film that is both highly enjoyable and thought provoking.

    A fantastic exploration of the career of an old general and a fascinating critique on the older British upper class that made the mistakes that led to World War 2. A well made, well acted film that is both highly enjoyable and thought provoking.

  • Jul 01, 2017

    I think an acceptable quote for this movie would be, "Keep your friends close, and your enemies even closer". What a fantastic movie and the technicolor! Oh the technicolor! It's so beautiful. I wish they would still make movies in Technicolor. It should be a standard. Anyways, this movie is a great epic with a lighthearted feel and a charming, funny and outgoing look at a topic that is exactly the opposite (war). I'll be watching this again.

    I think an acceptable quote for this movie would be, "Keep your friends close, and your enemies even closer". What a fantastic movie and the technicolor! Oh the technicolor! It's so beautiful. I wish they would still make movies in Technicolor. It should be a standard. Anyways, this movie is a great epic with a lighthearted feel and a charming, funny and outgoing look at a topic that is exactly the opposite (war). I'll be watching this again.

  • Jul 23, 2016

    Among the finest English films ever made, The Life and Death Of Colonel Blimp is like a rose without thorns, beautiful, but stands out among its colleagues. Clive Candy's obsession with Edith brings to mind Scottie's obsession with Madeline in Vertigo, and the following of a character from being a young European soldier to manhood brings Barry Lyndon to mind. The film is brilliant as a black comedy, but also provides social commentary relevant even in the present day.

    Among the finest English films ever made, The Life and Death Of Colonel Blimp is like a rose without thorns, beautiful, but stands out among its colleagues. Clive Candy's obsession with Edith brings to mind Scottie's obsession with Madeline in Vertigo, and the following of a character from being a young European soldier to manhood brings Barry Lyndon to mind. The film is brilliant as a black comedy, but also provides social commentary relevant even in the present day.

  • Jul 13, 2016

    This impressive and sweeping epic is about Colonel Clive Candy, and his amazing life through several wars and friendships. Its satirical in nature and wasn't liked at its time of release, but its a well made political satire and movie about friendship and the changing times. The performances are wonderful and its an interesting film for sure.

    This impressive and sweeping epic is about Colonel Clive Candy, and his amazing life through several wars and friendships. Its satirical in nature and wasn't liked at its time of release, but its a well made political satire and movie about friendship and the changing times. The performances are wonderful and its an interesting film for sure.

  • May 26, 2016

    The film follows this British soldier from his prime into his plump old age, yet it depicts him as ever the sentimentalist, ever the dreamer, and ever capable of love and compassion.

    The film follows this British soldier from his prime into his plump old age, yet it depicts him as ever the sentimentalist, ever the dreamer, and ever capable of love and compassion.

  • Mar 06, 2016

    Not only is The Life and Death of Colonel Blimp one of the most complex, nuanced, and best Powell/Pressburger films that they made, but it is also one of the finest films ever made period.

    Not only is The Life and Death of Colonel Blimp one of the most complex, nuanced, and best Powell/Pressburger films that they made, but it is also one of the finest films ever made period.

  • Mar 19, 2014

    Powell and Pressburger's remarkably modern war epic is a peculiarly acted comedy of manners and satire of British traditionalism which delicately reveals the horrible truth of modern warfare with grace and humor. It amounts to one of the greatest achievements not only in the director and screenwriter duo's careers, but in British cinema.

    Powell and Pressburger's remarkably modern war epic is a peculiarly acted comedy of manners and satire of British traditionalism which delicately reveals the horrible truth of modern warfare with grace and humor. It amounts to one of the greatest achievements not only in the director and screenwriter duo's careers, but in British cinema.