Line Walker 2: Invisible Spy Reviews

  • Sep 05, 2019

    Action was pretty cool. Story wise? I have no idea what they were thinking.

    Action was pretty cool. Story wise? I have no idea what they were thinking.

  • Aug 25, 2019

    Line Walker 2: Invisible Spy is one of those rare small gems that give hope to the average movie watcher that Hong Kong films can truly be good again. In these days where the average Hong Kong movie is of L Storm (2018) quality, Invisible Spy gives us a breath of fresh air with neat and tight plotting. Louis Koo and Nick Cheung play two cops that are childhood friends, one of whom went missing in the Philippines and has been trained as a killer by a shadowy organization. Francis Ng plays a cop friend of theirs. All three do turn in good performances, with Ng doing his best with a regrettably short screentime, Koo displaying his trademark charm and drama, and Nick Cheung firmly and solidly proving he still is a remarkable actor, handling drama and action well. Zhang Yichi from The Wandering Earth pops in as a Joker-like killer, and it was fun watching him go. Other than him, though, the villains go underdeveloped. What's their plan? Anarchy and chaos? It doesn't matter, because ultimately all three leads are humanly characterized, and the runtime, though short, does provide a good balance of character development and high-octane action thanks to director Jazz Boon and talented action choreographer Chin Kar Lok. An exceptionally good film in 2019 Hong Kong.

    Line Walker 2: Invisible Spy is one of those rare small gems that give hope to the average movie watcher that Hong Kong films can truly be good again. In these days where the average Hong Kong movie is of L Storm (2018) quality, Invisible Spy gives us a breath of fresh air with neat and tight plotting. Louis Koo and Nick Cheung play two cops that are childhood friends, one of whom went missing in the Philippines and has been trained as a killer by a shadowy organization. Francis Ng plays a cop friend of theirs. All three do turn in good performances, with Ng doing his best with a regrettably short screentime, Koo displaying his trademark charm and drama, and Nick Cheung firmly and solidly proving he still is a remarkable actor, handling drama and action well. Zhang Yichi from The Wandering Earth pops in as a Joker-like killer, and it was fun watching him go. Other than him, though, the villains go underdeveloped. What's their plan? Anarchy and chaos? It doesn't matter, because ultimately all three leads are humanly characterized, and the runtime, though short, does provide a good balance of character development and high-octane action thanks to director Jazz Boon and talented action choreographer Chin Kar Lok. An exceptionally good film in 2019 Hong Kong.