Reviews

  • May 30, 2012

    pas hyper facile d'accès. Un peu un film à festival, du quasi documentaire fictif.

    pas hyper facile d'accès. Un peu un film à festival, du quasi documentaire fictif.

  • Jun 22, 2011

    memories towards hangover! nostalgic...

    memories towards hangover! nostalgic...

  • Oct 07, 2010

    Little Cheung concludes Fruit Chan's trilogy about the days leading up to the transfer of sovereignity over Hong Kong in 1997. This time we witness the events from a child's perspective, allowing Chan to drop earlier flirtations with genre films, focusing instead on presenting a pure slice of life. It's also the most locally rooted of the films in the trilogy, referencing personalities from Hong Kong celebrity culture and the tabloid press during the time. The attention to locale is also transmitted visually via Lam Wah-Chuen's excellent camerawork, with images that enhance an actual sense of cultural and class-bound belonging. Like it's two preceding movies, Little Cheung is a film about disappearances and the conflict between old and new, but the feeling of loss is decidedly less burdensome in Little Cheung, since it's also a film about growing up and all the hopes for the future that come with it.

    Little Cheung concludes Fruit Chan's trilogy about the days leading up to the transfer of sovereignity over Hong Kong in 1997. This time we witness the events from a child's perspective, allowing Chan to drop earlier flirtations with genre films, focusing instead on presenting a pure slice of life. It's also the most locally rooted of the films in the trilogy, referencing personalities from Hong Kong celebrity culture and the tabloid press during the time. The attention to locale is also transmitted visually via Lam Wah-Chuen's excellent camerawork, with images that enhance an actual sense of cultural and class-bound belonging. Like it's two preceding movies, Little Cheung is a film about disappearances and the conflict between old and new, but the feeling of loss is decidedly less burdensome in Little Cheung, since it's also a film about growing up and all the hopes for the future that come with it.

  • Jan 23, 2010

    When people ask me what's the best film I've seen few have heard of, this is one of the films I usually bring up. Fruit Chan is the Hong Kong Martin Scorsese.

    When people ask me what's the best film I've seen few have heard of, this is one of the films I usually bring up. Fruit Chan is the Hong Kong Martin Scorsese.

  • Mar 11, 2009

    Great film, but I felt like it could have ended before it did.

    Great film, but I felt like it could have ended before it did.

  • Sep 22, 2008

    One of the best HK movie I've seen, brought back lots of childhood memories. The kid is brilliant, in fact all of the cast are well chosen

    One of the best HK movie I've seen, brought back lots of childhood memories. The kid is brilliant, in fact all of the cast are well chosen

  • Aug 25, 2008

    Incredibily charming!

    Incredibily charming!

  • Nov 14, 2006

    Little-seen masterpiece that needs a US dvd release.

    Little-seen masterpiece that needs a US dvd release.

  • Oct 04, 2005

    [center][img]http://img45.imageshack.us/img45/8585/b61411fx.jpg[/img] [left][font=Arial]A fresh take on the hit show. Some say it's a disgrace to the original, but I disagree. In fact, the whole thing plays out like a definitive ending to the show. The main character's your standard M:I agent, who gets stuck in what resembles a nightmare: [SPOILER]His team gets killed, he gets suspected by his employers, his mentor turns out to be the one who betrayed him and he has to team up with villains.[/SPOILER] Its sequel(s) are therefore unwanted. The best M:I 3 can do is feel like a long episode of the show.[/font] [font=Comic Sans MS][b]Crash: [/b][font=Arial]Haggis creates two-dimensional characters, has them preach for an entire movie and ultimately creates a completely shallow experience. Good for him. [/font][/font][font=Comic Sans MS][b]Bloody Sunday: [/b][font=Arial]Plenty of powerful moments, but it feels like someone's 95-year old grandma took care of the scene transitions. Damn! [/font][/font][font=Comic Sans MS][b]Little Cheung:[/b] [font=Arial]There's a character in this movie that's called "Man Ho". Heh. Man Ho. [/font][/font][font=Comic Sans MS][b]Danger: Diabolik (MST3K):[/b] [font=Arial]Plenty of laughs. Which is nice.[/font][/font] [/left] [/center]

    [center][img]http://img45.imageshack.us/img45/8585/b61411fx.jpg[/img] [left][font=Arial]A fresh take on the hit show. Some say it's a disgrace to the original, but I disagree. In fact, the whole thing plays out like a definitive ending to the show. The main character's your standard M:I agent, who gets stuck in what resembles a nightmare: [SPOILER]His team gets killed, he gets suspected by his employers, his mentor turns out to be the one who betrayed him and he has to team up with villains.[/SPOILER] Its sequel(s) are therefore unwanted. The best M:I 3 can do is feel like a long episode of the show.[/font] [font=Comic Sans MS][b]Crash: [/b][font=Arial]Haggis creates two-dimensional characters, has them preach for an entire movie and ultimately creates a completely shallow experience. Good for him. [/font][/font][font=Comic Sans MS][b]Bloody Sunday: [/b][font=Arial]Plenty of powerful moments, but it feels like someone's 95-year old grandma took care of the scene transitions. Damn! [/font][/font][font=Comic Sans MS][b]Little Cheung:[/b] [font=Arial]There's a character in this movie that's called "Man Ho". Heh. Man Ho. [/font][/font][font=Comic Sans MS][b]Danger: Diabolik (MST3K):[/b] [font=Arial]Plenty of laughs. Which is nice.[/font][/font] [/left] [/center]