Little Dorrit - Part Two: Little Dorrit's Story Reviews

  • 3d ago

    How disappointing that this masterpiece has so few reviews here. It proves you don't need a huge budget or special effects to tell a good story: just good writing and acting. One should also beware of the "fidelity syndrome". A film is not a book and vice versa. Ditching the villain Rigaud and turning the two part structure from poverty and riches into the story told from Arthur Clennam's and Little Dorrit's pov worked to the film's advantage, focussing on the key theme of the book: a love affair between two people whom society would reject if the full facts were known. Arthur Clennam was born out of wedlock and Amy Dorrit was born in the debtor's prison, the Marshalsea. Sarah Pickering was criticised by some for not being clearly spoken but I think this misses the point. She nailed the role in a way that Claire Foy didn't and couldn't. She was Amy Dorrit. There were some lovely touches in the film e.g. 1. About to leave the Marshalsea, Amy goes down the familiar staircase from her father's cell and leaps the last few steps, then goes back to repeat it one last time. 2.The jar of pickle dropping out of Amy's basket when she is told by her brother Tip is back in as a prisoner is another favourite moment. 3. Former sweetheart Flora Finching putting Arthur's hat lovingly on some cushions is another little gem of a moment. 4. The confrontation near the end between Max Wall as Flintwinch and Joan Greenwood as Mrs Clennam was two fine actors showing all their powers. 5. The moment when Amy runs along the Marshalsea yard to see Arthur in the same cell as her father occupied and the use of the flowers in the vase. 6. Amy instinctively tidying up her sister's bedroom while asking her about the bracelet. 7. Pancks telling Amy's fortune from her hand but actually describing what he knew of her life. 8. Young Amy and the dancing master and seamstress. This film deserves multiple viewing

    How disappointing that this masterpiece has so few reviews here. It proves you don't need a huge budget or special effects to tell a good story: just good writing and acting. One should also beware of the "fidelity syndrome". A film is not a book and vice versa. Ditching the villain Rigaud and turning the two part structure from poverty and riches into the story told from Arthur Clennam's and Little Dorrit's pov worked to the film's advantage, focussing on the key theme of the book: a love affair between two people whom society would reject if the full facts were known. Arthur Clennam was born out of wedlock and Amy Dorrit was born in the debtor's prison, the Marshalsea. Sarah Pickering was criticised by some for not being clearly spoken but I think this misses the point. She nailed the role in a way that Claire Foy didn't and couldn't. She was Amy Dorrit. There were some lovely touches in the film e.g. 1. About to leave the Marshalsea, Amy goes down the familiar staircase from her father's cell and leaps the last few steps, then goes back to repeat it one last time. 2.The jar of pickle dropping out of Amy's basket when she is told by her brother Tip is back in as a prisoner is another favourite moment. 3. Former sweetheart Flora Finching putting Arthur's hat lovingly on some cushions is another little gem of a moment. 4. The confrontation near the end between Max Wall as Flintwinch and Joan Greenwood as Mrs Clennam was two fine actors showing all their powers. 5. The moment when Amy runs along the Marshalsea yard to see Arthur in the same cell as her father occupied and the use of the flowers in the vase. 6. Amy instinctively tidying up her sister's bedroom while asking her about the bracelet. 7. Pancks telling Amy's fortune from her hand but actually describing what he knew of her life. 8. Young Amy and the dancing master and seamstress. This film deserves multiple viewing

  • Jul 12, 2020

    Overlong and far to slow paced despite the strong story.

    Overlong and far to slow paced despite the strong story.

  • Dec 26, 2019

    This part is seen through the eyes of Little Dorrit, also known as Amy (Sarah Pickering), and the viewer is brought to side with her, a seamstress from a debtor's prison, who is devoted to her father, played by Alec Guinness. Just brilliant storytelling, superbly acted.

    This part is seen through the eyes of Little Dorrit, also known as Amy (Sarah Pickering), and the viewer is brought to side with her, a seamstress from a debtor's prison, who is devoted to her father, played by Alec Guinness. Just brilliant storytelling, superbly acted.