Look What's Happened to Rosemary's Baby (Rosemary's Baby II) Reviews

  • Oct 24, 2019

    It's extremely brave to decide to make a sequel to a beloved horror classic. It can almost feel like some kind of suicide mission as critics and the general public alike will trot out the hackneyed old cliche of 'It's not as good as the first film!' as if this is an extremely original and perceptive line of criticism to extol. If you do decide to make said sequel there are several routes you can take when doing this. You can either try to recreate the tone and feel of the original (Halloween 2 is an example of this and a very good sequel). You can try to make a film that has a tone and atmosphere all of it's own whilst setting the action years ahead of the events of the original film (for example, Psycho 2 is an excellent film). Then you can make a film that is completely out there and batsh*t crazy. The 'made for TV sequel' to Rosemary's Baby, the masterpiece made by Roman Polanski in 1968, goes down this route. It's not often that whilst I watch a film I have a smile permanently etched onto my face at the sheer insanity I'm watching on the screen and that after the film has ended I have to take a few moments to reacclimatise myself to everyday life again whilst thinking 'What the f*ck was that?!' And I mean that in the best possible sense. I will try to summarise the madness contained within this gem's plot. I don't normally like to give detailed and 'scene by scene' plot outlines in my reviews but what you will read speaks for itself and sells the film perfectly. The film starts with a voice-over précis of the final events of the original but with the voices of the new actors in this production (only one actor returns from the original film and thankfully it's Ruth Gordon who is as brilliant in this movie). In this scene Rosemary (now played by Patty Duke) discovers  the baby she has given birth to but has been swiftly taken away from her. Rosemary looks at him and expresses horror at his eyes. Obviously, the dialogue here is different and not as impactful as the original. The first part of the film is called The Book of Rosemary and concerns her taking her son (called Adrian by the Satanic coven we know and love from the original but called Andrew by her to try and distance him from the role the coven think he's destined to live) away from the clutches of the coven and running away. She seeks refuge in a synagogue knowing that if she is in a house of God then the coven can't harm her in any way. It's here that we see her press a crucifix on a chain into her son's chest only for her to later see with horror that it has seared an imprint into his skin. We then see Rosemary the next day at a bus stop making a call to her famous actor ex-husband Guy (now played by George Maharis). As she speaks to him a group of children start to taunt Adrian/Andrew and take his toy car from him. In return he turns all full-on Satan on them and they fall to the ground unconscious. A random stranger Marjean has seen the whole incident and hides Rosemary and her son in her trailer. Marjean then offers to help Rosemary and her son to get onto a bus to escape. But whilst Rosemary boards the bus, the bus doors close and it rides off with her trapped on it whilst Marjean is at the roadside with Adrian/Andrew in her arms. It becomes apparent that Marjean is in fact a follower of the coven and this was planned all along. Rosemary goes to speak to the driver of the bus but it's then revealed that there is no driver on the bus. And this is the first act of the film! Crazy doesn't describe it! The second part of the film is called The Book of Adrian. It's more than 20 years later. We see Andrew/Adrian get pulled over for speeding. He later goes to a casino/nightclub that Marjean runs (described by him as his Aunt) who is alarmed by his apparently wild behaviour. She then refers to his parents as being killed in a car crash. We then see Adrian/Andrew's demonic side come to the fore as he tries to run over a biker gang. Minnie and Roman (the wonderful Gordon and Ray Millard) turn up to the casino to see Andrew/Adrian and ask him to drink one of Minnie's concoctions (echoes here of the chocolate mousse and 'health drink' from the original film) and when he falls unconscious they paint him in demonic warpaint.  It's here that I will leave the plot synopsis alone as to reveal anymore would impact on the viewers experience on watching this TV movie for the first time (just to add that there is a third act to the film called The Book of Andrew). Theres a musical interlude within this second segment where we see a far-out rock band at the casino get stage invaded by Andrew/Adrian. It's one of the freakiest scenes of the whole movie and thats really saying something! There are never any troughs in this movie. It starts at weirdness level 11 and continues at that level until the climax.  I'm so glad that this sequel was made in the hedonistic, narcotically charged 70's as the full unbridled eccentricity of the movie could be shot with no holds barred by filmmakers who were clearly heavily medicated. Add to the mental shenanigans a brilliant darkly psychedelic soundtrack by the ever great Charles Bernstein and you have a rollicking great time. There is also some impressive cinematography that is some of the best I've seen in a TV movie. In fact, I love the idea of some Average Joe at home in his 70's American home watching this be accident. I actually think it enriched and expanded minds. I'm so glad that this movie was made and that comes from a massive fan of the original film. If you love mental cinema, watch this. In fact, watch this back to back with the Exorcist 2: The Heretic.  I saw this on YouTube in a transfer from a very poor VHS tape. With Scream Factory releasing horror TV movies on Blu ray nowadays I hope to God (pun not intended) that they unleash this. A great transfer using a pristine print would be something to behold. This film deserves it. 

    It's extremely brave to decide to make a sequel to a beloved horror classic. It can almost feel like some kind of suicide mission as critics and the general public alike will trot out the hackneyed old cliche of 'It's not as good as the first film!' as if this is an extremely original and perceptive line of criticism to extol. If you do decide to make said sequel there are several routes you can take when doing this. You can either try to recreate the tone and feel of the original (Halloween 2 is an example of this and a very good sequel). You can try to make a film that has a tone and atmosphere all of it's own whilst setting the action years ahead of the events of the original film (for example, Psycho 2 is an excellent film). Then you can make a film that is completely out there and batsh*t crazy. The 'made for TV sequel' to Rosemary's Baby, the masterpiece made by Roman Polanski in 1968, goes down this route. It's not often that whilst I watch a film I have a smile permanently etched onto my face at the sheer insanity I'm watching on the screen and that after the film has ended I have to take a few moments to reacclimatise myself to everyday life again whilst thinking 'What the f*ck was that?!' And I mean that in the best possible sense. I will try to summarise the madness contained within this gem's plot. I don't normally like to give detailed and 'scene by scene' plot outlines in my reviews but what you will read speaks for itself and sells the film perfectly. The film starts with a voice-over précis of the final events of the original but with the voices of the new actors in this production (only one actor returns from the original film and thankfully it's Ruth Gordon who is as brilliant in this movie). In this scene Rosemary (now played by Patty Duke) discovers  the baby she has given birth to but has been swiftly taken away from her. Rosemary looks at him and expresses horror at his eyes. Obviously, the dialogue here is different and not as impactful as the original. The first part of the film is called The Book of Rosemary and concerns her taking her son (called Adrian by the Satanic coven we know and love from the original but called Andrew by her to try and distance him from the role the coven think he's destined to live) away from the clutches of the coven and running away. She seeks refuge in a synagogue knowing that if she is in a house of God then the coven can't harm her in any way. It's here that we see her press a crucifix on a chain into her son's chest only for her to later see with horror that it has seared an imprint into his skin. We then see Rosemary the next day at a bus stop making a call to her famous actor ex-husband Guy (now played by George Maharis). As she speaks to him a group of children start to taunt Adrian/Andrew and take his toy car from him. In return he turns all full-on Satan on them and they fall to the ground unconscious. A random stranger Marjean has seen the whole incident and hides Rosemary and her son in her trailer. Marjean then offers to help Rosemary and her son to get onto a bus to escape. But whilst Rosemary boards the bus, the bus doors close and it rides off with her trapped on it whilst Marjean is at the roadside with Adrian/Andrew in her arms. It becomes apparent that Marjean is in fact a follower of the coven and this was planned all along. Rosemary goes to speak to the driver of the bus but it's then revealed that there is no driver on the bus. And this is the first act of the film! Crazy doesn't describe it! The second part of the film is called The Book of Adrian. It's more than 20 years later. We see Andrew/Adrian get pulled over for speeding. He later goes to a casino/nightclub that Marjean runs (described by him as his Aunt) who is alarmed by his apparently wild behaviour. She then refers to his parents as being killed in a car crash. We then see Adrian/Andrew's demonic side come to the fore as he tries to run over a biker gang. Minnie and Roman (the wonderful Gordon and Ray Millard) turn up to the casino to see Andrew/Adrian and ask him to drink one of Minnie's concoctions (echoes here of the chocolate mousse and 'health drink' from the original film) and when he falls unconscious they paint him in demonic warpaint.  It's here that I will leave the plot synopsis alone as to reveal anymore would impact on the viewers experience on watching this TV movie for the first time (just to add that there is a third act to the film called The Book of Andrew). Theres a musical interlude within this second segment where we see a far-out rock band at the casino get stage invaded by Andrew/Adrian. It's one of the freakiest scenes of the whole movie and thats really saying something! There are never any troughs in this movie. It starts at weirdness level 11 and continues at that level until the climax.  I'm so glad that this sequel was made in the hedonistic, narcotically charged 70's as the full unbridled eccentricity of the movie could be shot with no holds barred by filmmakers who were clearly heavily medicated. Add to the mental shenanigans a brilliant darkly psychedelic soundtrack by the ever great Charles Bernstein and you have a rollicking great time. There is also some impressive cinematography that is some of the best I've seen in a TV movie. In fact, I love the idea of some Average Joe at home in his 70's American home watching this be accident. I actually think it enriched and expanded minds. I'm so glad that this movie was made and that comes from a massive fan of the original film. If you love mental cinema, watch this. In fact, watch this back to back with the Exorcist 2: The Heretic.  I saw this on YouTube in a transfer from a very poor VHS tape. With Scream Factory releasing horror TV movies on Blu ray nowadays I hope to God (pun not intended) that they unleash this. A great transfer using a pristine print would be something to behold. This film deserves it. 

  • Dec 26, 2014

    Believe it or not, this film is still better than the sequel that Ira Levin actually wrote.

    Believe it or not, this film is still better than the sequel that Ira Levin actually wrote.

  • Nov 08, 2013

    Absolutely terrible. I can't imagine how they thought they could create a sequel to Polanski's masterpiece. Didn't the tit;e give anyone a clue as to how bad it would be?

    Absolutely terrible. I can't imagine how they thought they could create a sequel to Polanski's masterpiece. Didn't the tit;e give anyone a clue as to how bad it would be?

  • Sep 08, 2013

    Probably only of value to affirmed fans of the Polanski original in terms of finding out the next chapter of the story - but certainly not for the direction or any Satanic tension. There's no cult value to this either.

    Probably only of value to affirmed fans of the Polanski original in terms of finding out the next chapter of the story - but certainly not for the direction or any Satanic tension. There's no cult value to this either.

  • Oct 15, 2009

    Ira Levin's ROSEMARY'S BABY was a landmark novel of suspense and terror. Acclaimed director Roman Polanski's 1968 film version was a motion picture masterpiece. In 1978, ABC-TV undertook a daring project: a made-for-television sequel to Rosemary's Baby. What ended up being broadcast over the airwaves was something of a television legend. Initially, it was despised and quickly disappeared from most people's memories. There were some, though, who never forgot... LOOK WHAT'S HAPPENED TO ROSEMARY'S BABY is an exercise in surrealistic filmmaking. Much of the film plays like a nightmare, gripping the viewer in its delicious unfurling of strange happenings. Rosemary is trying to keep her son away from the Castavets who are trying to help him come into full control of his father's powers.

    Ira Levin's ROSEMARY'S BABY was a landmark novel of suspense and terror. Acclaimed director Roman Polanski's 1968 film version was a motion picture masterpiece. In 1978, ABC-TV undertook a daring project: a made-for-television sequel to Rosemary's Baby. What ended up being broadcast over the airwaves was something of a television legend. Initially, it was despised and quickly disappeared from most people's memories. There were some, though, who never forgot... LOOK WHAT'S HAPPENED TO ROSEMARY'S BABY is an exercise in surrealistic filmmaking. Much of the film plays like a nightmare, gripping the viewer in its delicious unfurling of strange happenings. Rosemary is trying to keep her son away from the Castavets who are trying to help him come into full control of his father's powers.

  • Aug 16, 2009

    Most ludicrous sequel ever made.

    Most ludicrous sequel ever made.