Magical Girl Reviews

  • Jul 23, 2019

    Best spanish film in decades!

    Best spanish film in decades!

  • Sep 30, 2017

    sick, twisted and perverted and near perfect. watch it to feel surprised again by plot.

    sick, twisted and perverted and near perfect. watch it to feel surprised again by plot.

  • Apr 11, 2017

    Several dark and twisted stories entangle deeper into one another for a shocking and unsettling slow and painstaking rollercoaster.

    Several dark and twisted stories entangle deeper into one another for a shocking and unsettling slow and painstaking rollercoaster.

  • Oct 02, 2016

    It's a nuanced picture of desperation in the wake of an economic recession. It's a cruel and uncompromising nonlinear neo-noir. "Magical Girl" is a film that's quietly brimming with emotion and if you can connect with it on such a level, you will find a rewarding, unshakable experience.

    It's a nuanced picture of desperation in the wake of an economic recession. It's a cruel and uncompromising nonlinear neo-noir. "Magical Girl" is a film that's quietly brimming with emotion and if you can connect with it on such a level, you will find a rewarding, unshakable experience.

  • Sep 09, 2016

    Left me unsettled, shaken, shocked. The depth Vermut delves through to flesh out these characters is awe-inspiring. This film had that specific quality that automatically has you frantically recommending it to friends. Is it about an economically and socially stratified society? Is it about the absurdity of life? Or is it about debunking the binary moral view of the world? That's for you to find out, for you to appreciate, for you to reach at the end of this journey of a movie.

    Left me unsettled, shaken, shocked. The depth Vermut delves through to flesh out these characters is awe-inspiring. This film had that specific quality that automatically has you frantically recommending it to friends. Is it about an economically and socially stratified society? Is it about the absurdity of life? Or is it about debunking the binary moral view of the world? That's for you to find out, for you to appreciate, for you to reach at the end of this journey of a movie.

  • Apr 02, 2016

    puta filme. Almodóvar ganhou um filho diretor

    puta filme. Almodóvar ganhou um filho diretor

  • Carlos M Super Reviewer
    Oct 10, 2015

    Vermut proves already in his second film that he has a very interesting voice, giving us this story that remains always gripping as it shows how the lives of three different people get ironically intertwined by some unhappy circumstances - most of which provoked by themselves.

    Vermut proves already in his second film that he has a very interesting voice, giving us this story that remains always gripping as it shows how the lives of three different people get ironically intertwined by some unhappy circumstances - most of which provoked by themselves.

  • Aug 27, 2015

    I love film noir. It is often perceived as a somewhat clichéd and old fashioned genre but I take it seriously, and damn do I love the admittedly outdated angle of psychoanalysis in character construction. So I guess it's no wonder I think "Magical Girl" might be the best film I've seen this year. The plot of Carlos Vermut's sophomore effort is in fact film noir goofy, but it's not at all about the plausibility, it's about structure, character psychology and strong storytelling. The movie holds a shocking, thought-provoking twist after another, and it cuts through your defenses like a razor. In Vermut's film noir land of contemporary, recession crippled Spain lives an easily recognizable femme fatale. But this time she isn't a mysterious antagonist but the most central, deeply explored character of the whole piece. "Magical Girl" shows us what happens off screen in film noir, what the femme fatale goes through as she constructs her deceptive plan. Our femme is Barbara (Barbara Lennie), a mentally unstable housewife whose madness frightens and enchants us from the first frame. Barbara lives in a big fancy apartment, in seclusion while her apparently overbearing partner spends long days at work as a psychiatrist. Our everyman is Luis (Luis Bermejo) an unemployed middle-aged man who would do anything for his dying daughter Alicia (Lucia Pollan), soon to turn thirteen. Alicia loves Japanese Anime, and wants an incredibly expensive cosplay outfit of "Magical Girl Yukiko" for her birthday. As said, Luis would do anything for Alicia. Anything. A chance encounter between Barbara and Luis sets up a wildly tragic succession of events that rips both characters wide open. Their shared madness connecting their antagonistic poles, their differently miserable worlds collide. The process is depicted through incredibly intense scenes that hypnotize you with their beauty yet damage you, so powerful they are. One could maybe see it all as a very, VERY dark comedy, but the experience is so potent you are not allowed to distance yourself by laughter. The absurdity of the plot actually makes this claustrophobic fable of a movie even more disturbing.

    I love film noir. It is often perceived as a somewhat clichéd and old fashioned genre but I take it seriously, and damn do I love the admittedly outdated angle of psychoanalysis in character construction. So I guess it's no wonder I think "Magical Girl" might be the best film I've seen this year. The plot of Carlos Vermut's sophomore effort is in fact film noir goofy, but it's not at all about the plausibility, it's about structure, character psychology and strong storytelling. The movie holds a shocking, thought-provoking twist after another, and it cuts through your defenses like a razor. In Vermut's film noir land of contemporary, recession crippled Spain lives an easily recognizable femme fatale. But this time she isn't a mysterious antagonist but the most central, deeply explored character of the whole piece. "Magical Girl" shows us what happens off screen in film noir, what the femme fatale goes through as she constructs her deceptive plan. Our femme is Barbara (Barbara Lennie), a mentally unstable housewife whose madness frightens and enchants us from the first frame. Barbara lives in a big fancy apartment, in seclusion while her apparently overbearing partner spends long days at work as a psychiatrist. Our everyman is Luis (Luis Bermejo) an unemployed middle-aged man who would do anything for his dying daughter Alicia (Lucia Pollan), soon to turn thirteen. Alicia loves Japanese Anime, and wants an incredibly expensive cosplay outfit of "Magical Girl Yukiko" for her birthday. As said, Luis would do anything for Alicia. Anything. A chance encounter between Barbara and Luis sets up a wildly tragic succession of events that rips both characters wide open. Their shared madness connecting their antagonistic poles, their differently miserable worlds collide. The process is depicted through incredibly intense scenes that hypnotize you with their beauty yet damage you, so powerful they are. One could maybe see it all as a very, VERY dark comedy, but the experience is so potent you are not allowed to distance yourself by laughter. The absurdity of the plot actually makes this claustrophobic fable of a movie even more disturbing.

  • May 11, 2015

    Title: Unbalanced and illogical all over, apparently hoping that feel-good aspects of story let us overlook all its faults. It did not jerk any of my tears Saw this at the Rotterdam film festival 2015 (IFFR). In short: Unbalanced and illogical all over. Apparently hoping that the feel-good aspects of the story let us overlook all its faults. Anyway, It did not jerk any of my tears. The narrative left more than a few uncharted fields, and focused on other things that I deem mere side-ways. Important aspects of the underlying drama are not revealed to us, like why Barbara's past is so scary for Damian, and what her "psychological" issues exactly were (quote from IFFR website) or why she is a "disturbed girl" (quote from IMDB). The magical trick we see in school, in one of the openings scenes, is not enough to connect the dots later on. Similarly unclarified, we see how Damian reacts on Barbara's phone call, but leaving his defiant attitude devoid of any explanation. He seems just scared for unknown reasons. And near the finale, after learning how Barbara and the girl's father met and (!) that he stayed overnight, he freaks out, even to the extent that his attitude towards the father turns 180 degrees, all of that still for reasons unknown. That the father goes at any length to fulfill his ailing daughter's last wish, may be understandable as this is what parents do. But what we see happening here is certainly over-the-top. He does not even make an attempt to verify whether her wish still exists, as this could have been a short-lived dream from years ago. I admit that I'm trying to be rational here, but I never was a father, so what do I know. Finally, I am prepared to overlook how very coincidental our three protagonists meet each other. It is convoluted, but it could have happened this way, including the loose piece of the jigsaw puzzle lying on the street. On the other hand, the time devoted to all these side-ways would have been better spent on extra background information on the three. The synopsis on the festival website was a required read, yet insufficient to grasp all of the drama that enfolds in two hours time. We are withheld from being pulled in by the story, and also are being prevented from identifying ourselves with either one of the main characters, not even with the father who would be the obvious candidate for our sympathy.

    Title: Unbalanced and illogical all over, apparently hoping that feel-good aspects of story let us overlook all its faults. It did not jerk any of my tears Saw this at the Rotterdam film festival 2015 (IFFR). In short: Unbalanced and illogical all over. Apparently hoping that the feel-good aspects of the story let us overlook all its faults. Anyway, It did not jerk any of my tears. The narrative left more than a few uncharted fields, and focused on other things that I deem mere side-ways. Important aspects of the underlying drama are not revealed to us, like why Barbara's past is so scary for Damian, and what her "psychological" issues exactly were (quote from IFFR website) or why she is a "disturbed girl" (quote from IMDB). The magical trick we see in school, in one of the openings scenes, is not enough to connect the dots later on. Similarly unclarified, we see how Damian reacts on Barbara's phone call, but leaving his defiant attitude devoid of any explanation. He seems just scared for unknown reasons. And near the finale, after learning how Barbara and the girl's father met and (!) that he stayed overnight, he freaks out, even to the extent that his attitude towards the father turns 180 degrees, all of that still for reasons unknown. That the father goes at any length to fulfill his ailing daughter's last wish, may be understandable as this is what parents do. But what we see happening here is certainly over-the-top. He does not even make an attempt to verify whether her wish still exists, as this could have been a short-lived dream from years ago. I admit that I'm trying to be rational here, but I never was a father, so what do I know. Finally, I am prepared to overlook how very coincidental our three protagonists meet each other. It is convoluted, but it could have happened this way, including the loose piece of the jigsaw puzzle lying on the street. On the other hand, the time devoted to all these side-ways would have been better spent on extra background information on the three. The synopsis on the festival website was a required read, yet insufficient to grasp all of the drama that enfolds in two hours time. We are withheld from being pulled in by the story, and also are being prevented from identifying ourselves with either one of the main characters, not even with the father who would be the obvious candidate for our sympathy.

  • Mar 29, 2015

    What an unemployed father can do to get money and carry out the last wishes of his daughter who is about to die? The film begins with a pure and extremely sentimental proposal, but, in the course of the plot, will mixing stories and changing its meaning from water to wine. The abrupt manner inconsistent and confusing that the film gets in the end is totally incomprehensible. What happened to the head of the writer to make a story like that? Magical Girl is a film with a lot of ambition, but little cohesion and intelligence.

    What an unemployed father can do to get money and carry out the last wishes of his daughter who is about to die? The film begins with a pure and extremely sentimental proposal, but, in the course of the plot, will mixing stories and changing its meaning from water to wine. The abrupt manner inconsistent and confusing that the film gets in the end is totally incomprehensible. What happened to the head of the writer to make a story like that? Magical Girl is a film with a lot of ambition, but little cohesion and intelligence.