The Magnificent Seven Deadly Sins Reviews

  • Kevin M. W Super Reviewer
    Jun 07, 2017

    Only to be viewed as a curio, or as an insight into Brit culture of the time, this "comedy" is what seems to be a collection of television skits stitched together into an exploitative movie. There's your occasional flash of boobies or backside tied together to sell some pretty lame-o humor. The best bit ... oh, nevermind. Pass it by.

    Only to be viewed as a curio, or as an insight into Brit culture of the time, this "comedy" is what seems to be a collection of television skits stitched together into an exploitative movie. There's your occasional flash of boobies or backside tied together to sell some pretty lame-o humor. The best bit ... oh, nevermind. Pass it by.

  • Jan 30, 2017

    This British comedy anthology based on the seven deadly sins seems like it should be at least good for a laugh given the talent behind it, but it's actually pretty dire with one extraordinary exception. It's biggest problem is that all the bad sketches are in the first 2/3 of the film, making it a real chore to sit through to the point where it starts getting decent. The "Pride" segment, with Ian Carmichael and Alfie Bass as two drivers refusing to get out of each other's way, is pretty okay. The last segment, "Wrath", with Stephen Lewis pretty much playing his "On the Buses" character, is passable. Sandwiched between these is Spike Milligan's "Sloth" segment, which is a magnificently absurdist minor masterpiece (with Marty Feldman and Ronnie Barker in minor roles). Honestly, this segment is the only reason to watch the film, and though I hesitate to recommend a nearly 2 hour film for 15 minutes of screen time, it's really worth seeing just to admire this segment.

    This British comedy anthology based on the seven deadly sins seems like it should be at least good for a laugh given the talent behind it, but it's actually pretty dire with one extraordinary exception. It's biggest problem is that all the bad sketches are in the first 2/3 of the film, making it a real chore to sit through to the point where it starts getting decent. The "Pride" segment, with Ian Carmichael and Alfie Bass as two drivers refusing to get out of each other's way, is pretty okay. The last segment, "Wrath", with Stephen Lewis pretty much playing his "On the Buses" character, is passable. Sandwiched between these is Spike Milligan's "Sloth" segment, which is a magnificently absurdist minor masterpiece (with Marty Feldman and Ronnie Barker in minor roles). Honestly, this segment is the only reason to watch the film, and though I hesitate to recommend a nearly 2 hour film for 15 minutes of screen time, it's really worth seeing just to admire this segment.