The Man in the White Suit Reviews

  • Nov 02, 2020

    Good satire and Guinness is the perfect lead. Supporting cast is rather dull.

    Good satire and Guinness is the perfect lead. Supporting cast is rather dull.

  • Apr 10, 2020

    Very much a perfect movie. Witty, sweet, funny, timeless. A joy to watch not just for the great story, but visually as well. So many great scenes. Not a wasted second in it. Superb acting from the entire cast.

    Very much a perfect movie. Witty, sweet, funny, timeless. A joy to watch not just for the great story, but visually as well. So many great scenes. Not a wasted second in it. Superb acting from the entire cast.

  • Apr 01, 2020

    The satire ranges from superficial to commentaries on the imperfections of capitalism; interesting role to see Guinness in, more energetic than most of his better known films. Viewing it in the modern day it comes off as a dry, morosely funny statement on endless consumption. (3/5)

    The satire ranges from superficial to commentaries on the imperfections of capitalism; interesting role to see Guinness in, more energetic than most of his better known films. Viewing it in the modern day it comes off as a dry, morosely funny statement on endless consumption. (3/5)

  • Jan 05, 2020

    A truly great English film, that portrays an era where technology is far outpacing mans ability to harness it. Very subtly. Very unsettling how things haven't changed much, we've just seemed to shelf the idea of the gun pointed at our heads for the last 75 years. They just seems to be more reticent of it back then. No villains, no heroes. Great movie. Acting doesn't get much better. Cecil Parker's really good, and you notice actors I hadn't before, like the doctor in Lawrence of Arabia

    A truly great English film, that portrays an era where technology is far outpacing mans ability to harness it. Very subtly. Very unsettling how things haven't changed much, we've just seemed to shelf the idea of the gun pointed at our heads for the last 75 years. They just seems to be more reticent of it back then. No villains, no heroes. Great movie. Acting doesn't get much better. Cecil Parker's really good, and you notice actors I hadn't before, like the doctor in Lawrence of Arabia

  • Jul 07, 2018

    A trip down memory lane in its portrayal of corporate life and union behaviour, the message that an innate conservatism means we are all resistant to mavericks, particularly if those mavericks are scientists, remains debatable, and the fact that the hero doesn't get the girl is also an unexpected departure from certain workaday movie tropes.

    A trip down memory lane in its portrayal of corporate life and union behaviour, the message that an innate conservatism means we are all resistant to mavericks, particularly if those mavericks are scientists, remains debatable, and the fact that the hero doesn't get the girl is also an unexpected departure from certain workaday movie tropes.

  • May 26, 2018

    4/4 This is an amusing film, which raises interesting questions about the unintended consequences of scientific advances. Sydney Stratton's new fibers are undoubtedly a breakthrough, but the potential disruption to dozens of industries is incalculable. It's all happened before, of course. But this movie takes the idea of obsolescence to an extreme, which is terribly thought provoking. The environmental cost/benefit of his invention isn't even discussed here, but it would have to be in any modern consideration of this film. Instead, they focus on labor/management conflict issues, which was so much on the forefront of British life then.

    4/4 This is an amusing film, which raises interesting questions about the unintended consequences of scientific advances. Sydney Stratton's new fibers are undoubtedly a breakthrough, but the potential disruption to dozens of industries is incalculable. It's all happened before, of course. But this movie takes the idea of obsolescence to an extreme, which is terribly thought provoking. The environmental cost/benefit of his invention isn't even discussed here, but it would have to be in any modern consideration of this film. Instead, they focus on labor/management conflict issues, which was so much on the forefront of British life then.

  • Aug 26, 2017

    A delightful comedy set in England's industrial textile mill community, this farcical romp starring Alec Guinness as the peculiarly aloof scientist is one of Ealing Studios most entertaining pleasures.

    A delightful comedy set in England's industrial textile mill community, this farcical romp starring Alec Guinness as the peculiarly aloof scientist is one of Ealing Studios most entertaining pleasures.

  • Jun 14, 2015

    Only people who ever tried changing something will feel Sidney's pain. This movie depicts this experience incredibly well

    Only people who ever tried changing something will feel Sidney's pain. This movie depicts this experience incredibly well

  • Mar 21, 2015

    Grade: Middle of the road 7/10 The Man in the White Suit is an Ealing studios comedy made in 1951, and what a little gem this could be. The film has it's humour, good acting and just a little old fun for all involved, although it isn't exactly perfect all together. It has fine acting lead by a true legend of British cinema and is written and directed well, no wonder it was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Writing. Yes The Man in the White Suit is a funny old tale, and one that needs more explaining. The true star of this movie is Alec Guinness, an absolute fine actor and although maybe or maybe not performing at his best here, I think all who have seen this must be in agreement, he does very well. In fact with this, the entire cast do well. I especially liked Cecil Parker in his role as mill owner Alan Birnley who although unlike able as a character, seems to make the scenes better off with him in. The actor playing Birnley's daughter Daphne is also good and a great speech she does in one certain point is very well done indeed, a great cast put together well. The movie is smart and funny, now I have seen people saying about it not being funny and to be fair you can't expect laugh out loud humour. For one this is 1951 we have here but also it is more about the fun factor than the tears from laughter, but on that note there is humour, and a certain part with blowing up rooms is fairly funny. The film is directed well by Alexander Mackendrick who does a good job but Is over shadowed by the great script which I will come onto next. Now then, this script, written by well the director too so in truth Mackendrick does a fine job with everything he has here and with contributions by John Dighton and Roger MacDougall it all comes together to create brilliance. The lines are well done and that is why they fit well into the pace of the film, I won't lie my attention faded at slight times but the script is what really brought me back into attention and it paid off too. The overtones of this movie are also very important, this really was about the workers fighting the owners but also that both want to ruin Stratton's (Guinness) idea of the material. I think it also shows that although this is humour and not serious, it can have a more thought about side and again I come back to the script which basically serves as the base for this well done and well structured film. It also shows just how well Ealing studios can do a movie and I think this really set the precedent for Ealing made movies to be about the establishment fighting against the little guy. This isn't flawless this movie I want to just add, it isn't so so far but the lack of laughs does mean as I mentioned, attention can be lost at times. I found it to be just about good and I think many will enjoy it no matter what age and no matter what tastes in film, if you listen well and watch in a rather happy mood then this is good viewing. This is good old British cinema and at it's finest back in the day, with so much going on here and a rather interesting plot despite the premise, this serves as a reminder never to underestimate films of the past.

    Grade: Middle of the road 7/10 The Man in the White Suit is an Ealing studios comedy made in 1951, and what a little gem this could be. The film has it's humour, good acting and just a little old fun for all involved, although it isn't exactly perfect all together. It has fine acting lead by a true legend of British cinema and is written and directed well, no wonder it was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Writing. Yes The Man in the White Suit is a funny old tale, and one that needs more explaining. The true star of this movie is Alec Guinness, an absolute fine actor and although maybe or maybe not performing at his best here, I think all who have seen this must be in agreement, he does very well. In fact with this, the entire cast do well. I especially liked Cecil Parker in his role as mill owner Alan Birnley who although unlike able as a character, seems to make the scenes better off with him in. The actor playing Birnley's daughter Daphne is also good and a great speech she does in one certain point is very well done indeed, a great cast put together well. The movie is smart and funny, now I have seen people saying about it not being funny and to be fair you can't expect laugh out loud humour. For one this is 1951 we have here but also it is more about the fun factor than the tears from laughter, but on that note there is humour, and a certain part with blowing up rooms is fairly funny. The film is directed well by Alexander Mackendrick who does a good job but Is over shadowed by the great script which I will come onto next. Now then, this script, written by well the director too so in truth Mackendrick does a fine job with everything he has here and with contributions by John Dighton and Roger MacDougall it all comes together to create brilliance. The lines are well done and that is why they fit well into the pace of the film, I won't lie my attention faded at slight times but the script is what really brought me back into attention and it paid off too. The overtones of this movie are also very important, this really was about the workers fighting the owners but also that both want to ruin Stratton's (Guinness) idea of the material. I think it also shows that although this is humour and not serious, it can have a more thought about side and again I come back to the script which basically serves as the base for this well done and well structured film. It also shows just how well Ealing studios can do a movie and I think this really set the precedent for Ealing made movies to be about the establishment fighting against the little guy. This isn't flawless this movie I want to just add, it isn't so so far but the lack of laughs does mean as I mentioned, attention can be lost at times. I found it to be just about good and I think many will enjoy it no matter what age and no matter what tastes in film, if you listen well and watch in a rather happy mood then this is good viewing. This is good old British cinema and at it's finest back in the day, with so much going on here and a rather interesting plot despite the premise, this serves as a reminder never to underestimate films of the past.

  • Mar 21, 2015

    Alec ...rarely wonderful

    Alec ...rarely wonderful