A Map of the World Reviews

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January 1, 2000
Gives three first-rate actors a chance to stretch.
January 1, 2000
The result of what happens when a pedestrian director shoots a tone-deaf script.
January 1, 2000
Disappointingly unengaging.
January 1, 2000
Scott Elliott's palsied directorial debut, from a mine shaft-ridden script, is a sick joke.
January 1, 2000
Maddeningly uneven.
January 1, 2000
Too many situations are set up or suggested without much follow-through.
January 1, 2000
The film positively crawls.
January 1, 2000
Asks how anyone could live with themselves when a child entrusted into their care dies.
January 1, 2000
The film overflows with the studied ordinariness that prevails in Mom movies, where glamorous Hollywood stars muck about in pajamas and a little epiphany may be signaled by a broken cereal bowl on the kitchen floor.
January 1, 2000
The screenplay has such unspeakable dialogue that you don't even believe in the characters you're watching.
January 1, 2000
Gooey with sentiment.
January 1, 2000
A Map of the World is a grim, humorless melodrama with very little entertainment value.
January 1, 2000
May be too painful and downbeat for many moviegoers. But it redefines courage in acting.
January 1, 2000
An accomplished film that continually takes us beyond our first impressions of people and situations.
January 1, 2000
In this season of Oscar-bait overacting, I'm grateful that "A Map of the World" includes recognizable emotional landmass.
January 1, 2000
Acclaimed stage director Scott Elliot makes an auspicious debut behind the camera.
January 1, 2000
In a time when Hollywood usually gets a woman's life all wrong, A Map of the World, with more than its share of true moments, somehow gets it right.
January 1, 2000
[A] imaginative, nimble performance.
January 1, 2000
Most of the film feels borrowed from other movies.
January 1, 2000
A truly remarkable film. It is just not for everyone.
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