Margot at the Wedding Reviews

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August 23, 2018
OK, this all sounds a bit tiresome and shop-worn... But, as well as being savage, it is also savagely droll, with several truly laugh-out-loud moments, and the performances are stunning.
November 16, 2011
February 29, 2008
Doesn't quite measure up to its predecessor but it is still an often painfully accurate study of fractured family relationships.
February 29, 2008
Dramatically and visually, there's no relief to be had in this self-indulgent downer.
February 29, 2008
There is such a thing as binge pessimism. It happens when one living disaster area, considered insufficient in a story, is served up with several others, causing audience braincells to swirl, stagger and collide against thalamic lampposts.
February 29, 2008
Never fully coheres or convinces.
February 29, 2008
Humourless (though supposedly a comedy) and pretentious, almost a parody of the self-indulgent Sundance festival film, right down to the washed-out colours, droning dialogue and the title in big sans-serif capitals.
February 29, 2008
Some of the dialogue is well-crafted and the performances are generally strong (although Black hams shamelessly at times) but the characters are so loathsome that you long for a hurricane to sweep away this wedding party.
February 29, 2008
Magnetic, subtly tragic and ultimatley sympathetic, worth a watch if only to remind yourself why you don't go home for Christmas anymore.
February 28, 2008
Baumbach's interest in families - a distinct Baumbachian sort of family - is acute and his observations often painful and delivered with a dry wit.
February 28, 2008
A sharply observed but bleak examination of family dysfunction, anchored by solid performances.
February 26, 2008
Margot oozes poison from start to finish, challenging you to give a damn.
December 20, 2007
The odiousness of [Baumbach's] protagonists ... isn't as problematic a factor as is the redundancy (and occasional mean-spiritedness) of his psychological portraits.
December 14, 2007
Kidman's performance keeps you transfixed all the way through, because she delves into her character's damaged psyche so fully, you're constantly fascinated to see what biting, acidic thing she will say next.
December 14, 2007
Apart from John Turturro in a cameo, all the characters are monsters and/or basket cases.
December 14, 2007
It's clear that Margot is a troubled soul in some kind of terrible pain, but the film does little to depict her as anything but a pushy, judgmental, and overly critical human being.
December 13, 2007
There isn't a pleasant, wholly likable character in the cast. But you can't avert your eyes from it.
December 7, 2007
Writer-director Noah Baumbach solidifies his standing as the modern bard of American dysfunctional families with Margot at the Wedding, but at the same time he's recycling material he's already covered, and covered more exquisitely.
November 24, 2007
There's no question Baumbach has a way with words and actors (Kidman, Leigh and Jack Black are terrific).
November 23, 2007
These characters don't seem illuminating at all -- just damned annoying and, ultimately, dead boring.
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