Martin & Orloff (2002)



Critic Consensus: No consensus yet.

Martin & Orloff Videos

Martin & Orloff Photos

Movie Info

American independent filmmaker Lawrence Blume makes his feature debut with the absurd dark comedy Martin & Orloff, starring a lot of the folks from the Upright Citizens Brigade. Martin Flam (Ian Roberts) designs mascot costumes for a corporate chain of Chinese restaurants. After a failed suicide attempt, he goes to see the incompetent therapist Dr. Eric Orloff (Matt Walsh). Under the guise of conducting therapy sessions, the quack doctor then drags Martin on a series of seemingly random adventures about town. Dr. Orloff then recruits a gang of oddballs and malcontents (played by Katie Roberts, Sal Graziano, David Cross, and H. Jon Benjamin) to help Martin face his fears. The film also includes cameos from comedians Janeane Garofalo, Tina Fey, Andy Richter, and Amy Poehler. Martin & Orloff was screened at the 2002 South by Southwest Film Festival.
Directed By:
Written By:
In Theaters:

Watch it now


Ian Roberts
as Martin Flam
Matt Walsh
as Dr. Orloff
Amy Poehler
as Patty
David Cross
as Dan Wasserman
Andy Richter
as Maitre d'
Sal Valente
as Jimbo
Les J.N. Mau
as Mr. Chan
Kim Raver
as Kashia
Tina Fey
as Southern Lady
Janeane Garofalo
as Hairdresser
Marie O'Reilly
as MaxForce Secretary
Terrence Bae
as China Chef Thug 1
Billy Chang
as China Chef Thug 2
Sean Conroy
as Frankie
Teddy Goluca
as Petros
Nolan Carley
as Old Man in Theater
Marylouise Burke
as Mrs. Flan
Jack O'Reilly
as Egg Roll
Show More Cast

Critic Reviews for Martin & Orloff

All Critics (17) | Top Critics (8)

One of the few films you could call wildly uneven and the filmmakers would still consider it a compliment.

Full Review… | May 14, 2004
Detroit Free Press
Top Critic

The movie and its players have a natural, matter-of-fact sense of comedy. It doesn't rub our faces in its jokes.

Full Review… | May 7, 2004
Boston Globe
Top Critic

You'll chuckle at least once during the proceedings -- but probably not much more than that.

Full Review… | January 15, 2004
Chicago Tribune
Top Critic

Provides a fairly steady series of laughs thanks to the fully committed performances by the two stars and the sheer brazenness of its humor.

November 14, 2003
Hollywood Reporter
Top Critic

Martin & Orloff might have worked as a 10-minute sketch, but Lawrence Blume's low-budget feature quickly wears thin.

November 7, 2003
New York Post
Top Critic

Unless you find kicks in the groin hilarious, the lunacy here is considerably more tired than inspired.

Full Review… | November 7, 2003
New York Daily News
Top Critic

Audience Reviews for Martin & Orloff

[center][img][/img] [/center] [font=Century Gothic] I'm biased towards this movie due to the Upright Citizens Brigade connection (I take classes developed by the troupe and generally worship the ground they walk on), but I think I can safely call it one of the funniest indie comedies in the last few years, partially because the competition has been so lousy. World's greatest straight man Ian Roberts wrote the script with his wife Katie and his fellow UCB stockholder Matt Walsh, based on improvisations similar to the way they constructed their cult Comedy Central series. The other half of the team, Matt Besser and Amy Poehler, also appear along with other alt-comedy favorites like David Cross and Jon Benjamin. As such, this is high-pedigree humor, and even the most asinine, gutterball jokes have a higher mark of quality than your run-of-the-mill raunch-com. There's not a lot of substance to it (though there is a certain deranged poignance to starting off your film with the main character cleaning up the splatter of his attempted suicide), but it also can't be accused of any of the usual shortcomings of the Farrellys and Sandlers of the world. Instead of attempting to tidy up its boys' club hijinx with unnecessary love stories and undeserved warmth, it just gets increasingly absurd and bizarre, continuously flying in the face of the very concept of being a movie and pulling off otherworldly gags that would be a hard sell on paper. The primary goal at all times is to go for the biggest and/or least obvious laugh possible, and sometimes that means completely abandoning the structure of the script for a marginal throwaway gag, but usually it leads to grand "I can't believe they put this in a movie" moments. It's cheaply, hastily assembled, and there's a strange sense that half the actors are walking in clueless as a favor and improvising the story out of a hole, but Roberts and Walsh make an unbelievably funny team, and even its most rough-and-tumble moments are still chuckle-worthy. Credit is due to Lawrence Blume (son of Judy, for real) for reigning all this anarchy into something resembling a real film, and a damn funny one at that.[/font]

John Ferrer
John Ferrer

Jon Benjamin stole this movie in what scenes he had. Otherwise, this comedy piloted itself well given its subject matter. Definitely solid.

C.J. Hammond
C.J. Hammond

Absolutely unbelievable absurdly undeniably brilliant and hilarious. The best comedy no one has ever heard of. See it now. But also tell me, why did you try to kill yourself?

Louis Falcetti
Louis Falcetti

Martin & Orloff Quotes

There are no approved quotes yet for this movie.

Discussion Forum

Discuss Martin & Orloff on our Movie forum!

News & Features