Reviews

  • Nov 03, 2021

    A depressing film full of bullying, racism, sexism, and nothing else really

    A depressing film full of bullying, racism, sexism, and nothing else really

  • May 05, 2021

    It's films like this that should be shown at every school to illustrate exactly what it is that the older generation has given to this country to make it so much better than 40 years ago. It's bleakness and desperation is a testament to how far we have come. You can smell this movie, it's that good. And the score, although jarring, works perfectly.

    It's films like this that should be shown at every school to illustrate exactly what it is that the older generation has given to this country to make it so much better than 40 years ago. It's bleakness and desperation is a testament to how far we have come. You can smell this movie, it's that good. And the score, although jarring, works perfectly.

  • Feb 28, 2021

    Mike Leigh's impressive early partially improvised work showcases multiple amazing performances, especially from the central duo, Tim Roth and Phil Daniels as Colin and Mark, two deadbeat brothers in 1980s Thatcher's London, heavily unemployed, suffering from a painful class gap. Even though the film never seems to directly bash the infamously criticized system shown on the screen, Leigh does emphasize the darkness created by said system: the crippling feeling of helplessness in the face of a world doing its best to keep you inside the cage of poverty, all kinds of petty reactions to the abovementioned system like envy and frustration on 'the rich'. Although bleak and pseudo-realistic in nature, Meantime still finds the few beams of light in the blackness, using dark humor and witty observations on the little man, making him (or her) relatable. Pair that with the film's clever lines (I cannot say the word 'script' since one cannot tell what was script and what was improvised) and you'll get a must-watch for anyone interested in the unfiltered tongue-in-cheek social commentary of the 80's and 90's English cinema.

    Mike Leigh's impressive early partially improvised work showcases multiple amazing performances, especially from the central duo, Tim Roth and Phil Daniels as Colin and Mark, two deadbeat brothers in 1980s Thatcher's London, heavily unemployed, suffering from a painful class gap. Even though the film never seems to directly bash the infamously criticized system shown on the screen, Leigh does emphasize the darkness created by said system: the crippling feeling of helplessness in the face of a world doing its best to keep you inside the cage of poverty, all kinds of petty reactions to the abovementioned system like envy and frustration on 'the rich'. Although bleak and pseudo-realistic in nature, Meantime still finds the few beams of light in the blackness, using dark humor and witty observations on the little man, making him (or her) relatable. Pair that with the film's clever lines (I cannot say the word 'script' since one cannot tell what was script and what was improvised) and you'll get a must-watch for anyone interested in the unfiltered tongue-in-cheek social commentary of the 80's and 90's English cinema.

  • Nov 13, 2017

    Little victories of domestic life are really the biggest victories, especially when you start with no dignity. Here is a spontaneous development of a powerful and rather victorious story arc.

    Little victories of domestic life are really the biggest victories, especially when you start with no dignity. Here is a spontaneous development of a powerful and rather victorious story arc.

  • Apr 25, 2017

    Anxiety breeds anger which firmly holds your head down in the mud of poverty. This is O Lucky Man meets Pinter's The Caretaker as a kitchen sink drama. It's not exactly fun to watch but that's only due to the truly excellent acting all around. Small problems ignored on every scale and level-from families, to their building management, to the government. This is what we collectively look away from, and that's why it needed to be made.

    Anxiety breeds anger which firmly holds your head down in the mud of poverty. This is O Lucky Man meets Pinter's The Caretaker as a kitchen sink drama. It's not exactly fun to watch but that's only due to the truly excellent acting all around. Small problems ignored on every scale and level-from families, to their building management, to the government. This is what we collectively look away from, and that's why it needed to be made.

  • Sep 29, 2015

    Life man, this film captures it brilliantly. Some of the lowest of the lower class during a very low time in Britain, it's characters are all so true to form. The characters are all really great and I want to watch this time after time just to see Tim Roth's performance as Colin.

    Life man, this film captures it brilliantly. Some of the lowest of the lower class during a very low time in Britain, it's characters are all so true to form. The characters are all really great and I want to watch this time after time just to see Tim Roth's performance as Colin.

  • Sep 28, 2014

    Almost as boring as real life.

    Almost as boring as real life.

  • Sep 28, 2013

    Mike Leigh's first feature film is up there with his best to date. It's a great slice of nostalgia, early 80's suburbia under Thatcher.

    Mike Leigh's first feature film is up there with his best to date. It's a great slice of nostalgia, early 80's suburbia under Thatcher.

  • Apr 23, 2013

    A searing indictment of contemporary society and the way it turns its residents into jittery caricatures--A beautiful and truthful film!!

    A searing indictment of contemporary society and the way it turns its residents into jittery caricatures--A beautiful and truthful film!!

  • Oct 09, 2012

    Mike Leigh at his best, but then that's true of most of his films. Top notch acting, realistic script and an intense but gripping story. A perfect slice of social realism.

    Mike Leigh at his best, but then that's true of most of his films. Top notch acting, realistic script and an intense but gripping story. A perfect slice of social realism.