Meeting People Is Easy Reviews

  • Apr 23, 2018

    Es el mensaje que desprende OK Computer. Ahora en formato largometraje. Disfruta y sé fitter happier.

    Es el mensaje que desprende OK Computer. Ahora en formato largometraje. Disfruta y sé fitter happier.

  • Nov 26, 2017

    Soooooo.....veryyyyyy.......tedious......ughhhhhh!!!!

    Soooooo.....veryyyyyy.......tedious......ughhhhhh!!!!

  • Apr 21, 2015

    Perhaps it's my bias as a huge Radiohead fan speaking - but Meeting People Is Easy is undoubtedly one of the most bleak music documentaries I've ever seen. It chronicles Radiohead's international tour for their critically-acclaimed OK Computer, their subsequent burnout, and the inordinate attention they received for it. It also follows the exacerbation of frontman Thom Yorke's depression in part due to international stardom. Director Grant Gee's style does wonders for this film. It's mostly shot in harrowing black-and-white, though there are a few colorized shots spliced in. He captures societal and technological disillusionment with his camerawork, complimenting the subject matter of OK Computer's lyrics wonderfully. There are a few shots in here that even rival the camerawork of master auteurs. Unlike most documentaries, Meeting People Is Easy is shot in a mostly experimental framework, which may put off some viewers expecting a conventional rockumentary akin to Led Zeppelin's The Song Remains the Same. Gee conveys mood with a conflation of Radiohead's music, white noise, and superb camerawork. Little is explained or said in here, but what is carries immense weight. Perhaps the most surprising thing about this documentary is how it deconstructs the notion that international music stardom is a walk in the park. Spoiler alert: it is not that easy. International stardom brings unwanted attention and scrutiny. Imagine, just for a second, how hard it would be walking out of any building if its exterior was teeming with paparazzis. Just imagine how you would feel about the infringement of you privacy at nearly every waking moment. This film is one of the most experimental and unique yet thoroughly accessible music documentaries out there. Although the film ends quite anticlimactically and you get little to no resolution (if you need that, look up Radiohead's Wikipedia article), for the most part it is thoroughly enjoyable, albeit devastating. Meeting people is easy. Making business with them, far less.

    Perhaps it's my bias as a huge Radiohead fan speaking - but Meeting People Is Easy is undoubtedly one of the most bleak music documentaries I've ever seen. It chronicles Radiohead's international tour for their critically-acclaimed OK Computer, their subsequent burnout, and the inordinate attention they received for it. It also follows the exacerbation of frontman Thom Yorke's depression in part due to international stardom. Director Grant Gee's style does wonders for this film. It's mostly shot in harrowing black-and-white, though there are a few colorized shots spliced in. He captures societal and technological disillusionment with his camerawork, complimenting the subject matter of OK Computer's lyrics wonderfully. There are a few shots in here that even rival the camerawork of master auteurs. Unlike most documentaries, Meeting People Is Easy is shot in a mostly experimental framework, which may put off some viewers expecting a conventional rockumentary akin to Led Zeppelin's The Song Remains the Same. Gee conveys mood with a conflation of Radiohead's music, white noise, and superb camerawork. Little is explained or said in here, but what is carries immense weight. Perhaps the most surprising thing about this documentary is how it deconstructs the notion that international music stardom is a walk in the park. Spoiler alert: it is not that easy. International stardom brings unwanted attention and scrutiny. Imagine, just for a second, how hard it would be walking out of any building if its exterior was teeming with paparazzis. Just imagine how you would feel about the infringement of you privacy at nearly every waking moment. This film is one of the most experimental and unique yet thoroughly accessible music documentaries out there. Although the film ends quite anticlimactically and you get little to no resolution (if you need that, look up Radiohead's Wikipedia article), for the most part it is thoroughly enjoyable, albeit devastating. Meeting people is easy. Making business with them, far less.

  • Jan 17, 2015

    Echoing some of the reviews I have seen below, I would like to state this isn't for everyone. But for a fan like myself, it's absolutely necessary to watch this and will move something inside of you. Some of the scenes are quite telling.

    Echoing some of the reviews I have seen below, I would like to state this isn't for everyone. But for a fan like myself, it's absolutely necessary to watch this and will move something inside of you. Some of the scenes are quite telling.

  • Apr 22, 2014

    As a piece of art, it feels curiously cliched now. Perhaps because in the near two decades since it was filmed, so many of the techniques have been copied so often. As a demonstration why being a globe-straddling rock star might not actually be a great deal of fun, its convincing. The music, when we hear it, is a timely reminder that Radiohead were the best prog rock band Britain produced. If I knew where to look, I'm in the crowd somewhere during the Glastonbury set...

    As a piece of art, it feels curiously cliched now. Perhaps because in the near two decades since it was filmed, so many of the techniques have been copied so often. As a demonstration why being a globe-straddling rock star might not actually be a great deal of fun, its convincing. The music, when we hear it, is a timely reminder that Radiohead were the best prog rock band Britain produced. If I knew where to look, I'm in the crowd somewhere during the Glastonbury set...

  • Nov 19, 2013

    one of the best Radiohead documentaries I have EVER SEEN.

    one of the best Radiohead documentaries I have EVER SEEN.

  • Jun 02, 2013

    Hugely underated documentary.

    Hugely underated documentary.

  • Jan 20, 2013

    All serious Radiohead fans must view every few years.

    All serious Radiohead fans must view every few years.

  • Oct 17, 2012

    Brilliant music and filmmaking.

    Brilliant music and filmmaking.

  • Sep 15, 2012

    Revisited this doco covering Radiohead dealing with the critical acclaim, constant touring and incessant promotion following the release of OK Computer. Let down by the lame arsed "experimental" filmmaking and the often inaudible dialogue... Highlights include Thom Yorke almost drowning whilst making the No Surprises film clip and the band formulating songs that would appear on Kid A and Amnesiac...

    Revisited this doco covering Radiohead dealing with the critical acclaim, constant touring and incessant promotion following the release of OK Computer. Let down by the lame arsed "experimental" filmmaking and the often inaudible dialogue... Highlights include Thom Yorke almost drowning whilst making the No Surprises film clip and the band formulating songs that would appear on Kid A and Amnesiac...