Merata: How Mum Decolonised the Screen Reviews

October 7, 2019
As Merata shows, Mita's entire life was a fight - one that Hepi continues with this documentary that looks not only to secure Mita's legacy but enlarge it.
August 21, 2019
Despite this being his directorial debut, he appears on initial inspection to be adept at the process.
May 17, 2019
The doc's appraisal of [Alanis] Obomsawin's work is appreciated and productive in illustrating how voices like Obomsawin and Mita are still far too rare when they have so much to say.
May 10, 2019
At its intimate best, "Merata" is an embrace and an education, a son's love letter and for cineastes, a celebration of inclusion and voice.
May 9, 2019
There's so much here to recommend.
May 9, 2019
The more personal the film gets, the more universal it becomes. Less academic, perhaps, it still celebrates the filmmaking talent of the first indigenous woman to direct a feature film, but doesn't shy from the damage done along the way.
February 11, 2019
A portrait of an icon of Indigenous cinema as directed by her son.
February 5, 2019
As Miti successfully makes us appreciate his mother's passions and progress, it's strange to see something so personal packaged like a lecture.
February 1, 2019
A moving tribute to this exceptional filmmaker and a crash course in Māori cinema.
January 29, 2019
MERATA: How Mum Decolonised The Screenshows how this important filmmaker was able to overcome adversity in her quest to become a champion for Indigenous cinema.
January 29, 2019
Merata Mita is a pioneer in film that most people outside New Zealand don't know, and... "Merata: How Mum Decolonised the Screen" goes a long way of correcting that blind spot and furthering her mission to bring different voices to movies.
January 29, 2019
Though Merata never shies away from the more uncomfortable realities of its subject's life - broken marriages, poverty, clashes with the authorities, and so on - Hepi's love and respect for his mum still resonates through nearly every frame.
August 2, 2018
[Director Merata Mita ] deserves more than most to have her story and her work remembered, re-evaluated and celebrated. Her own son has achieved all that.