Midnight in Paris

2011

Midnight in Paris

Critics Consensus

It may not boast the depth of his classic films, but the sweetly sentimental Midnight in Paris is funny and charming enough to satisfy Woody Allen fans.

93%

TOMATOMETER

Total Count: 219

83%

Audience Score

User Ratings: 82,288
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Movie Info

This is a romantic comedy set in Paris about a family that goes there because of business, and two young people who are engaged to be married in the fall have experiences there that change their lives. It's about a young man's great love for a city, Paris, and the illusion people have that a life different from theirs would be much better. It stars Owen Wilson, Rachel McAdams, Marion Cotillard, Kathy Bates, Carla Bruni, among others. -- (C) Sony Classics

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Cast

Carla Bruni
as Museum Guide
Adrien Brody
as Salvador Dali
Corey Stoll
as Ernest Hemingway
Tom Hiddleston
as F. Scott Fitzgerald
Alison Pill
as Zelda Fitzgerald
Léa Seydoux
as Gabrielle
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Critic Reviews for Midnight in Paris

All Critics (219) | Top Critics (52)

Audience Reviews for Midnight in Paris

  • Mar 27, 2016
    Woody Allen at his finest, Midnight in Paris is both funny and sweet, while also dishing out some delightful performances from the entire ensemble cast thanks to an ingenius premise and realistic characters.
    Matthew M Super Reviewer
  • Jan 22, 2014
    This movie is a classic ode to the classic movies, and let me tell you Woody Allen is a classic. Mighty Aphrodite, Match Point, or whatever it is Woody is Romantic Comedy Gold.
    Joseph E Super Reviewer
  • Jan 18, 2014
    More emotionally nostalgic than intellectually provoking or psychologically challenging, Woody continues his recent task to visit European cities and display his vast mental cultural library to the audience with yet another charming excuse. This time, he grabs Paris, a city that has been used so many times in celluloid that it already sounds cliché... unless it is given the Woody Allen treatment. The feature is an immediate charmer and has the capacity of attracting a wider audience than his regular target market. Even if the viewer requires a very basic knowledge on literature, architecture, cinema and painting to catch the numerous nods to the art forms of the first half of the 19th Century (cheers for the inclusion of Gauguin and Matisse), Midnight in Paris, unlike most of the previous cases, does not demand a prior familiarization with the director's character trademarks and nostalgic love letters to breathing and living cities and to the great minds of the past era that intellectually shaped contemporary society, even if those are patterns still seen here. On the contrary, the simplicity of the usage of fantasy mirrors Almodóvar's Volver (2006): elegant and funny, but subtle. The opening sequence could mean two things: the farewell of a great director, or a promise of even greater things to come during the following 90 minutes. Both assumptions turned out to be wrong. The force of the introduction had the same charisma that the one in Manhattan (1979), but it was more peaceful and had less energy. So, we were led to think that the intentions of the film were simpler then, but still with a scope large enough to capture a city and its important artistic figures. Well, in this case, not quite... Analyzing the final product and comparing it with Woody Allen's entire trajectory, the film plays it safe, with a horrible miscast in the leading role, but with a very simple story easy to fall in love with, even if it is not, like stated in the beginning of this review, something revolutionary. Nevertheless, knowing that Woody is still capable of applying the same heart he has done before without losing his film signature is something that us, fans, find valuable. 71/100
    Edgar C Super Reviewer
  • Jan 07, 2014
    [img]http://images.rottentomatoes.com/images/user/icons/icon14.gif[/img]
    Directors C Super Reviewer

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