De Helaasheid der Dingen (The Misfortunates) - Movie Reviews - Rotten Tomatoes

De Helaasheid der Dingen (The Misfortunates) Reviews

June 14, 2010
If Ken Loach and Roberto Benigni went into a bar, drank themselves into a stupor and emerged the next morning with a screenplay, it might look a lot like The Misfortunates.
June 14, 2010
A bawdy, heartfelt glimpse into a proudly dysfunctional Belgium family.
June 10, 2010
The Misfortunates is a bleak comedy that's not as funny or grim as it needs to be.
Full Review | Original Score: 2/4
June 3, 2010
There's whimsy and raunchy humor here, but also an underlying sense of darkness and despair.
Full Review | Original Score: 3.5/4
April 30, 2010
An appalling childhood may risk making you an unhappy person when you grow up, but it almost guarantees a great yarn.
Full Review | Original Score: 3/4
April 9, 2010
Comedy doesn't get any more tragic than this.
Full Review | Original Score: 3/4
April 9, 2010
Mr. Groeningen wrings a lot of queasy comedy out of the Strobbes for a long stretch, immersing you in their mess, bringing you uncomfortably close to their muck.
Read More | Original Score: 3/5
April 9, 2010
The acting is super -- these guys know how to be sweet and disgusting -- and the story provides its share of laughs. But after a while, the one-note movie, directed by Felix van Groeningen, grows tiresome.
Full Review | Original Score: 2/4
April 9, 2010
The ultimate lesson of van Groeningen's boisterous and surprisingly moving film is that even a family as damaged as this one has a legacy worth heeding.
Full Review | Original Score: 3.5/4
April 7, 2010
Felix Van Groeningen's highly entertaining tale is full of hilarity, horror and heartbreak (sometimes within the same scene).
Full Review | Original Score: 3/5
December 14, 2009
A word of advice: Do not invite the Strobbe family over for Christmas dinner, as they're likely to leave the house strewn with beer bottles and broken furniture.
August 26, 2009
Calling the Strobbe clan a working-class family would imply that some of its members worked (or had class), but none of the lowlife protags do in the visually robust and often hilarious Flemish tragicomedy The Misfortunates.