The Most Dangerous Game - Movie Reviews - Rotten Tomatoes

The Most Dangerous Game Reviews

Page 2 of 13
July 24, 2013
Innovative as Island of the Lost Souls was, a film from the same year. The two films ought to be considered companion pieces, early, pre-Code, B-movie flicks with horrifying island antics and haunting performances by the villains. Leslie Banks!
June 23, 2013
An insane hunter arranges for ships to be wrecked so that he can amuse himself by hunting them like animals in his island. What should feel like a thrown together lightweight thriller adventure shot on the jungle sets of King Kong actually feels like a gripping and chilling film full of suspense and exciting action sequences that can boast some admirable photography, particularly in its final chase sequences.
½ April 11, 2013
It has all the qualities that make an old-time thriller as much fun as we like them.
½ February 6, 2013
A short thriller from the 30's that understands its limitations but tries to overcome them. It is the first adaptation from Richard Connell's short story where man becomes the prey. The buoys near an island have been readjusted to lead boats near coral reefs where they sink. Any survivors will make it to a small island where they will encounter the Russian Count Zaroff. When McCrea's character arrives at the lonely mansion-fortress, he is introduced to two other survivors from a previous ship wreck. McCrea meets the character of Wray who is suspicious of the count when two previous shipmates never return to the castle. Quite a bit of the acting is flawed and superficial, but this was one of the earliest action films with special effects. They are still beginning to explore how the film and sound mediums can be employed to their advantage. A fast paced piece that builds suspense within its narrative. While its superficiality and lack of expertise hold it back, it is groundbreaking in entering the uncharted waters of action and the philosophical question of what it would be like to be the hunted rather than the hunter; humans hunting each other. David O. Selznick produced this film for Radio Pictures.
½ December 27, 2012
Pretty good, though the lack of subtitles on Hulu meant I missed a lot of the dialogue, so I'll need to see this again sometime to really be able to nail down an opinion.
December 12, 2012
A perfect adaptation of the excellent short story. My only complaint was the modified final battle between Rainsford and Zaroff, but the last shot that could only be done due to the alteration makes up for it completely.
November 18, 2012
There's some surprisingly gruesome stuff in this pre production code 30s film. Shot on the same sets as King Kong.
November 13, 2012
Count Zaroff means for his hunting to act upon the most extreme limits of possibility. Human possibility. Sadistic and motivated, Zaroff keeps a trophy room of his kills... human heads among other things, at the expense of the innocent shipwreck survivors. A mere classic in a misunderstood genre of filmmaking. One does not need only monsters and gore to create horror, rather, the most simple sadistic aspects of the human mind proves to be the most terrifying reality of all.
November 4, 2012
What a delicious slice of a 1930's campy, action/adventure movie. The Most Dangerous Game is not overly original in its storytelling, but it is ahead of the curve when it comes to content.

An American hunter named Bob Rainsford is shipwrecked on a deserted island. Or at least he thinks it's deserted. He happens upon a Russian mansion owned by the eerie Count Zaroff. There are two other shipwreck survivors already living with the Count. Rainsford is just happy to be alive, until he finds out the secret of Count Zaroff. The Count is a hunter as well. After years of hunting, the unthinkable happend, he started to get bored with hunting. He had hunted some of the most terrifying game, like leopards and tigers. But now he hunts the most dangerous game...people. He lures people to his island and plays the most dangerous game. They have to survive a day on his island, without him killing them. If they do, they are freed. No one had ever survived the Count. Rainsford and fellow captive, Eve Trowbridge, are sent out into the island. He must use his skill as a hunter to elude Count Zaroff.

There are many pluses to this movie, but the acting isn't one of them. I never liked Joel McCrea, and he isn't very good in this. It is a functional performance, but kind of stiff. The Queen of Scream, Fay Wray, plays Eve. Most well known for her role in King Kong, Wray gives a similar performance to McCrea. Usable, but stiff. The one shining actor is Leslie Banks as Count Zaroff. He is appropriately over-the-top, but it is definitely the best performance of the movie.

This is the most violent classic movie that I've seen. By today's standards, this is pretty tame, but for back then...There are severed heads, and characters getting impaled by bamboo sticks, and our hero snapping a bad guys back. Of course it's made in the 30's, so it isn't gory, but still, you don't see stuff like this from back then.

It has a few faults, but The Most Dangerous Game is still highly entertaining. At only 63 minutes, it never drags or overstays its welcome. For classic movie fans, this is easily worth a watch.

"This world's divided into two kinds of people: the hunter and the hunted. Luckily I'm the hunter. Nothing can change that." 8.5/10
October 26, 2012
Great little 1930s suspense/horror movie, but yet again horrendously overrated by RT! A strong cast deal with a relatively straightforward plot, but the pace and atmosphere save the day. A unique little story and another in the great run of 1930s shockers.
½ August 29, 2012
willis o'brien and fay wray, ring a bell.
½ August 23, 2012
I don't know why I didn't like this that much, aside from the several ways it's different from its source.

PLOT:After getting in a shipwreck off a boat headed to a hunt, world-renowned hunter, Bob Rainsford (Joel McCrea) swims to a mysterious island where he finds a castle lead by a Count Zaroff (Leslie Banks), a Russian Cossack that has also has a passion for the hunt. While there, Rainsford also discovers two more shipwreck survivors, heavy-drinking Martin Trowbridge (Robert Armstrong) and his beautiful sister, Eve Trowbridge (Fay Wray). They chat for a while, and Rainsford finds out by Zaroff that, on this certain island, Zaroff hunts the most dangerous game. Zaroff tells about how he got bored hunting some usually dangerous animals (such as tigers), and how he wanted a prey that can use reason. Through this we find out the most dangerous game is humans. After a suspenseful turn of events, Rainsford and Eve must play the role of the hunted and win against him within a day. It's a great plot executed decently.

ACTING:The acting in here is not so great. You can tell by far that it's dated. McCrea plays a decent part of Rainsford, but the screenplay does him almost no justice. Wray did a pretty great job of playing her usual damsel-in-distress character. She was a little over-dramatic, but overall she did great, as did Banks as Zaroff. Banks did a pretty great job as Zaroff as well, but he sounded angry almost all the time, as opposed to his role in the story of being smooth and calm. I think Zaroff's character would've much better been played by the likes of Bela Lugosi. It has the dramatic death scene and everything! The minor performances overall didn't really matter as well.

SCORE:The score was pretty cheesy, but for its time, it was pretty top notch, so I'll give it credit for that much.

CAMERAWORK:I noticed in here a pretty good use of the camera to capture the emotions of the actors, as used in old horror films. The director actually hit spot on with trying to capture the emotions with the camera.

OTHER CONTENT:I really don't know why I didn't like this film as much as I wanted to. I read the story before I watched it, and as early as the start of the film, I spotted about a thousand differences from the story that make the film lose some of its wit. That kind of ticked me off. If a film strays too far from its source material, I tend to get frustrated. The film also seemed to lag a bit in the middle and lose the suspense it did acheive. The film did have a good bit of suspenseful scenes, and it even used a handful of horror tactics to make things better. However, it altogether ended up pretty dated and mediocre.

OVERALL,an ok film with a decently-executed plot, dated acting, top notch score for the time being, pretty good use of the camera, some great suspense, and even some horror techniques, but the screenplay did the actors hardly any justice, the film falls from its source material greatly, and it lagged a good bit in the middle.
August 23, 2012
I don't know why I didn't like this that much, aside from the several ways it's different from its source.

PLOT:After getting in a shipwreck off a boat headed to a hunt, world-renowned hunter, Bob Rainsford (Joel McCrea) swims to a mysterious island where he finds a castle lead by a Count Zaroff (Leslie Banks), a Russian Cossack that has also has a passion for the hunt. While there, Rainsford also discovers two more shipwreck survivors, heavy-drinking Martin Trowbridge (Robert Armstrong) and his beautiful sister, Eve Trowbridge (Fay Wray). They chat for a while, and Rainsford finds out by Zaroff that, on this certain island, Zaroff hunts the most dangerous game. Zaroff tells about how he got bored hunting some usually dangerous animals (such as tigers), and how he wanted a prey that can use reason. Through this we find out the most dangerous game is humans. After a suspenseful turn of events, Rainsford and Eve must play the role of the hunted and win against him within a day. It's a great plot executed decently.

ACTING:The acting in here is not so great. You can tell by far that it's dated. McCrea plays a decent part of Rainsford, but the screenplay does him almost no justice. Wray did a pretty great job of playing her usual damsel-in-distress character. She was a little over-dramatic, but overall she did great, as did Banks as Zaroff. Banks did a pretty great job as Zaroff as well, but he sounded angry almost all the time, as opposed to his role in the story of being smooth and calm. I think Zaroff's character would've much better been played by the likes of Bela Lugosi. It has the dramatic death scene and everything! The minor performances overall didn't really matter as well.

SCORE:The score was pretty cheesy, but for its time, it was pretty top notch, so I'll give it credit for that much.

CAMERAWORK:I noticed in here a pretty good use of the camera to capture the emotions of the actors, as used in old horror films. The director actually hit spot on with trying to capture the emotions with the camera.

OTHER CONTENT:I really don't know why I didn't like this film as much as I wanted to. I read the story before I watched it, and as early as the start of the film, I spotted about a thousand differences from the story that make the film lose some of its wit. That kind of ticked me off. If a film strays too far from its source material, I tend to get frustrated. The film also seemed to lag a bit in the middle and lose the suspense it did acheive. The film did have a good bit of suspenseful scenes, and it even used a handful of horror tactics to make things better. However, it altogether ended up pretty dated and mediocre.

OVERALL,an ok film with a decently-executed plot, dated acting, top notch score for the time being, pretty good use of the camera, some great suspense, and even some horror techniques, but the screenplay did the actors hardly any justice, the film falls from its source material greatly, and it lagged a good bit in the middle.
August 1, 2012
Boring at first, then a bang of suspense is shot at the viewer towards the end. The Most Dangerous game is an urban classic and is a frightful mystery that goes on and on until the shocking finale.
July 6, 2012
Friday, October 1, 2010

(1932) The Most Dangerous Game
ACTION/ DRAMA

One of the most influential movies of any generation which the central theme is men hunting men! Joel McCrea stars as an unknown passenger which was purposely part of wreckage to a deserted island oblivious that the passengers are only brought in for the intention of hunting them down. The sole idea has been reused and used again most notable director John Woo for the film "Hard Target", others include "The Running Man", "Surviving The Game", "Betrayl" and many others! The film starring Joel McCrea discovering an island with oblivious intentions only to find out about the sick madman's selfish intentions!
Ingenious idea give this film it's very high rating!

4 out of 4
July 4, 2012
Seems to end to be too short but there are some nice visual touches.
July 3, 2012
100% no doubt about it, great cast, inspiring story, you really cant miss this one,
½ June 2, 2012
For 1932 this was a decent film and had some gruesome parts in it as well. I guess you could say this is a back stabbing type movie. It's a dangerous game.
May 26, 2012
The Grandfather of them all--The birth of survival horror sub-genre!!
themoviewaffler.com
Super Reviewer
May 2, 2012
Were it not overshadowed by it's producer/director team of Merian C Cooper and Schoedsack's "King Kong" two years later, this movie would probably get a lot more recognition. It's influence has been palpable and elements of it's story can be seen in everything from "Predator" to "The Hunger Games". Made at the height of the great depression, audiences may have found the tale of a rich megalomaniac using others for his entertainment quite poignant.
As the twisted count, Banks is superb, even if his accent is more Scottish than Russian. Why he didn't make more genre appearances is baffling, given this was the era of "Frankenstein" and "Dracula". During WWI he suffered an injury which paralysed the left half of his face, a wound he exploits to add a sinister edge to the character. McCrea gives an early indication of the all-American star he would go on to become while Wray lays down the foundations of becoming cinema's first great scream queen. Kong's leading man Robert Armstrong has an amusing role as a drunk.
Has there ever been more impressive set design than the great horror movies of the thirties? The attention to detail here is outstanding, a practice that's sadly been lost in these greenscreen times. Even the door knocker on Banks island fortress is creepy as hell, a miniature representation of a giant beast holding a woman in his monstrous hands. Did they have Kong in mind when designing this? Yes, the two movies were actually shot back to back. Were I a rich collector of movie memorabilia, this item would most definitely be mounted on my front door. Banks' island resembles the more famous Skull Island from Kong, all creeping vines and rubber bats flying in the background. This is no coincidence, the same jungle sets were utilised for both pictures.
To get the most from such production design takes a skilled cameraman, and Henry W Gerrard does some thrilling work here. He began in silents so knew the importance of a strong image. Action sequences of the era are often quite clunky but Gerrard's roving camera adds to the excitement. There are some fantastic tracking shots through the jungle, the foliage brushing against the lens and really putting you in the scene. Sadly he passed away three years later on the cusp of greatness having just lensed "Of Human Bondage".
Running at a brisk 63 minutes, today's film-makers could learn a lot from this movie's pacing. There's not an ounce of fat on this script. If Peter Jackson remade it we'd probably get an inexplicable three hour version.
Page 2 of 13