Mother Teresa: In the Name of God's Poor Reviews

  • May 20, 2016

    She was the opposite of a saint. Loved the suffering of people because it was her belief that suffering brought people closer to God. Freaking idiot.

    She was the opposite of a saint. Loved the suffering of people because it was her belief that suffering brought people closer to God. Freaking idiot.

  • May 08, 2012

    This is not a film about a saint, unless you count canonisation by the media a true mark of sainthood, in which case most biopics about the "architects of the culture of death" would count as saints' lives. This is a film about a philanthropist who won the Nobel peace prize, and who happened to be a nun. What kind of nun is difficult to tell from the film, since she seems to have owed about as much to Gandhi (that other saint of the media) as to Jesus, and believed all religions worshiped the same God (another bromide of our religiously illiterate culture.) When she turns a former Hindu temple into a hospital, she considers it "already blessed for God's work", whereas an orthodox Catholic would probably have viewed it as in need of exorcism because of its association with idolatry. Films about saints are extremely rare, and when they do get produced, they are usually released directly to DVD, and those DVDs are not distributed properly: try to do a search for "Clare and Francis" on dvdpricesearch for instance. And when you find one that is widely available and features stars like Geraldine Chaplin, you have the right to be suspicious. In this case, what you get is the standard Hallmark treatment. I have a personal hatred of Hallmark movies. Whatever they are about, they are trite, bland, politically correct, "consensual", Americanised, watered down products, filled with feel-good cliches and prefabricated kleenex moments and merely contribute to the media fog that prevents us from getting at the truth of things. In this case, Mother Teresa becomes a mere apostle of religious tolerationism and a one-woman welfare state, a kind of grandmotherly liberal icon whose more Catholic traits are edited out. Her orthodox stand on abortion, for instance, is never referred to, which is all the more blameworthy as she spoke on the subject in her Nobel prize speech, with which the film ends. I will not go into the debate of whether Mother Teresa was actually a saint or not. A rather informative article can be found at the following url: http://www.traditioninaction.org/bkreviews/A_025br_MotherTeresa_Zima.htm

    This is not a film about a saint, unless you count canonisation by the media a true mark of sainthood, in which case most biopics about the "architects of the culture of death" would count as saints' lives. This is a film about a philanthropist who won the Nobel peace prize, and who happened to be a nun. What kind of nun is difficult to tell from the film, since she seems to have owed about as much to Gandhi (that other saint of the media) as to Jesus, and believed all religions worshiped the same God (another bromide of our religiously illiterate culture.) When she turns a former Hindu temple into a hospital, she considers it "already blessed for God's work", whereas an orthodox Catholic would probably have viewed it as in need of exorcism because of its association with idolatry. Films about saints are extremely rare, and when they do get produced, they are usually released directly to DVD, and those DVDs are not distributed properly: try to do a search for "Clare and Francis" on dvdpricesearch for instance. And when you find one that is widely available and features stars like Geraldine Chaplin, you have the right to be suspicious. In this case, what you get is the standard Hallmark treatment. I have a personal hatred of Hallmark movies. Whatever they are about, they are trite, bland, politically correct, "consensual", Americanised, watered down products, filled with feel-good cliches and prefabricated kleenex moments and merely contribute to the media fog that prevents us from getting at the truth of things. In this case, Mother Teresa becomes a mere apostle of religious tolerationism and a one-woman welfare state, a kind of grandmotherly liberal icon whose more Catholic traits are edited out. Her orthodox stand on abortion, for instance, is never referred to, which is all the more blameworthy as she spoke on the subject in her Nobel prize speech, with which the film ends. I will not go into the debate of whether Mother Teresa was actually a saint or not. A rather informative article can be found at the following url: http://www.traditioninaction.org/bkreviews/A_025br_MotherTeresa_Zima.htm

  • May 08, 2012

    watched 'Mother Teresa' by Olivia Hussey in a theatre...

    watched 'Mother Teresa' by Olivia Hussey in a theatre...

  • May 08, 2012

    Bon film, sur une femme extraordinaire.

    Bon film, sur une femme extraordinaire.

  • May 08, 2012

    Nice perfs, but does little to challenge or even complexify the potted versions of the the Mother Theresa story.

    Nice perfs, but does little to challenge or even complexify the potted versions of the the Mother Theresa story.

  • May 08, 2012

    Amazing, powerful, inspiring. If all people had only 5% of her goodness in them...

    Amazing, powerful, inspiring. If all people had only 5% of her goodness in them...

  • May 08, 2012

    "Mother Teresa" by the Petrie Sisters is the one I love but it wasn't on the list. It changed my life.

    "Mother Teresa" by the Petrie Sisters is the one I love but it wasn't on the list. It changed my life.

  • May 08, 2012

    beatiful movie...beautiful life

    beatiful movie...beautiful life

  • May 08, 2012

    the movie and the story is very thouching and very amasing.mother teresa is the true follower of god jesus

    the movie and the story is very thouching and very amasing.mother teresa is the true follower of god jesus

  • May 08, 2012

    DER STERN HAT SICH NICHT GEIRRT ALS ER STEHEN BLIEB ÜBER DEM HAUS DER KLEINEN LEUTE: DORT IST DIE GROSSE ZUKUNFT GEBOREN:

    DER STERN HAT SICH NICHT GEIRRT ALS ER STEHEN BLIEB ÜBER DEM HAUS DER KLEINEN LEUTE: DORT IST DIE GROSSE ZUKUNFT GEBOREN: