Mr. Deeds Goes to Town Reviews

  • Apr 06, 2019

    Pleasant little picture.

    Pleasant little picture.

  • Feb 17, 2019

    Interesting portrayal, but too drawn out, with no purpose. The acting is very good, but the plot leaves much to be desired. This is reminiscent of another 1936 gem "The Great Ziegfeld", also too long and suffering from plot holes. However, there is much more redeeming value in Ziegfeld than in this, both historically and in resplendent glory. The acting on both movies was above par.

    Interesting portrayal, but too drawn out, with no purpose. The acting is very good, but the plot leaves much to be desired. This is reminiscent of another 1936 gem "The Great Ziegfeld", also too long and suffering from plot holes. However, there is much more redeeming value in Ziegfeld than in this, both historically and in resplendent glory. The acting on both movies was above par.

  • Jan 01, 2019

    Fun movie. Holds up well considering it was made in 1936.

    Fun movie. Holds up well considering it was made in 1936.

  • Dec 08, 2018

    Though it isn't always clear on what side of everything the titular Mr. is on, this early dramedy has heartwarming messages that must have had huge significance in the midst of the great depression.

    Though it isn't always clear on what side of everything the titular Mr. is on, this early dramedy has heartwarming messages that must have had huge significance in the midst of the great depression.

  • Antonius B Super Reviewer
    Oct 30, 2018

    Another Capra vehicle for decency, the common man, and the ideals of America as he saw them, â~Mr. Deeds Goes to Townâ(TM) is heart-warming and engaging. When a small-town guy (Gary Cooper) inherits a large fortune, he goes to New York, where heâ(TM)s preyed upon by his uncleâ(TM)s own lawyers, a newspaper reporter who cozies up to him to get the inside scoop of what heâ(TM)s like (Jean Arthur), and others who are looking to swindle him. At first, he seems like an easy target, showing more interest in playing his tuba, sliding down his new mansionâ(TM)s bannisters, and dashing to the window when he hears a fire truck go by, like a big kid. We quickly see another side of him when he remains aloof about not relinquishing power of attorney, and then getting to the bottom of a board meeting for an opera club thatâ(TM)s losing money. What a nice moment that is â" and if youâ(TM)ve ever been in a position where you have to dig into the details when someone else is established and trying to redirect you, youâ(TM)ll identify. Mr. Deeds is childlike in some ways, but heâ(TM)s got common sense, and wonâ(TM)t be pushed around. He also quickly understands when heâ(TM)s being made a fool of by a table of poets at a dinner club. Jean Arthur is as charming as ever in her role, even if the trope of her character is often seen â" the woman who starts off a relationship with ulterior motives, but then softens and ends up with genuine feelings. She has some lovely scenes with Cooper, and both of them show good range. She first feels his earnestness when after taking him to Grantâ(TM)s Tomb, which more jaded tourists are disappointed by, he says: âOh, I see a small Ohio farm boy becoming a great soldier. I see thousands of marching men. I see General Lee, with a broken heart, surrendering. I can see the beginning of a new nation, like Abraham Lincoln said. And I can see that Ohio boy being inaugurated as president. Things like that can only happen in a country like America.â? Itâ(TM)s a bit much I suppose, but it shows the purity of idealism. Capra delivers several other social comments, many of which are spoken during a trial whose procedures are a bit questionable, but whose messages are stirring, and I imagine especially so during the Depression. Heâ(TM)s still a beacon of light today, and I felt this (adjusted) lyric float up into my mind: â~Where have you gone, Frank Russell Capra, a nation turns its lonely eyes to you.â? As in other movies, he wanders close to the edge of having Cooper seem Christ-like, and indeed, at one point Arthur remarks that sheâ(TM)s crucifying him, and later he sits mutely, under the unfairest of attacks. There are moments of levity, however, and itâ(TM)s interesting that this was the film that was the origin of the word â~doodlingâ(TM). I will include some quotes that speak to helping others and kindness: âWhat puzzles me is why people seem to get so much pleasure out of hurting each other. Why don't they try liking each other once in a while?â? âPeople here are funny. They work so hard at living, they forget how to live. Last night, after I left you, I was walking along, looking at the tall buildings, and I got to thinkin' about what Thoreau said. â~They created a lot of grand palaces here, but they forgot to create the noblemen to put in them.â(TM) I'd rather have Mandrake Falls.â? âNo matter what system of government we have, there'll always be leaders and always be followers. Like the road in front of my house, on a steep hill. Every day, I watch the cars climbing up. Some go lickety-split up that hill, some have to shift into second. Some sputter and shake and slip back to the bottom again. Same cars, same gasoline, yet some make it and some don't. I say the fellows who can make the hill should stop and help those who can't. That's all I'm trying to do, help fellows who can't make the hill.â? âIt's like I see one fellow in a rowboat who's tired of rowing and wants a free ride, and another who's drowning. Who would you expect me to rescue? Mr. Cedar, who wants a free ride? Or those men who are drowning? Any 10-year-old child will give you the answer to that.â?

    Another Capra vehicle for decency, the common man, and the ideals of America as he saw them, â~Mr. Deeds Goes to Townâ(TM) is heart-warming and engaging. When a small-town guy (Gary Cooper) inherits a large fortune, he goes to New York, where heâ(TM)s preyed upon by his uncleâ(TM)s own lawyers, a newspaper reporter who cozies up to him to get the inside scoop of what heâ(TM)s like (Jean Arthur), and others who are looking to swindle him. At first, he seems like an easy target, showing more interest in playing his tuba, sliding down his new mansionâ(TM)s bannisters, and dashing to the window when he hears a fire truck go by, like a big kid. We quickly see another side of him when he remains aloof about not relinquishing power of attorney, and then getting to the bottom of a board meeting for an opera club thatâ(TM)s losing money. What a nice moment that is â" and if youâ(TM)ve ever been in a position where you have to dig into the details when someone else is established and trying to redirect you, youâ(TM)ll identify. Mr. Deeds is childlike in some ways, but heâ(TM)s got common sense, and wonâ(TM)t be pushed around. He also quickly understands when heâ(TM)s being made a fool of by a table of poets at a dinner club. Jean Arthur is as charming as ever in her role, even if the trope of her character is often seen â" the woman who starts off a relationship with ulterior motives, but then softens and ends up with genuine feelings. She has some lovely scenes with Cooper, and both of them show good range. She first feels his earnestness when after taking him to Grantâ(TM)s Tomb, which more jaded tourists are disappointed by, he says: âOh, I see a small Ohio farm boy becoming a great soldier. I see thousands of marching men. I see General Lee, with a broken heart, surrendering. I can see the beginning of a new nation, like Abraham Lincoln said. And I can see that Ohio boy being inaugurated as president. Things like that can only happen in a country like America.â? Itâ(TM)s a bit much I suppose, but it shows the purity of idealism. Capra delivers several other social comments, many of which are spoken during a trial whose procedures are a bit questionable, but whose messages are stirring, and I imagine especially so during the Depression. Heâ(TM)s still a beacon of light today, and I felt this (adjusted) lyric float up into my mind: â~Where have you gone, Frank Russell Capra, a nation turns its lonely eyes to you.â? As in other movies, he wanders close to the edge of having Cooper seem Christ-like, and indeed, at one point Arthur remarks that sheâ(TM)s crucifying him, and later he sits mutely, under the unfairest of attacks. There are moments of levity, however, and itâ(TM)s interesting that this was the film that was the origin of the word â~doodlingâ(TM). I will include some quotes that speak to helping others and kindness: âWhat puzzles me is why people seem to get so much pleasure out of hurting each other. Why don't they try liking each other once in a while?â? âPeople here are funny. They work so hard at living, they forget how to live. Last night, after I left you, I was walking along, looking at the tall buildings, and I got to thinkin' about what Thoreau said. â~They created a lot of grand palaces here, but they forgot to create the noblemen to put in them.â(TM) I'd rather have Mandrake Falls.â? âNo matter what system of government we have, there'll always be leaders and always be followers. Like the road in front of my house, on a steep hill. Every day, I watch the cars climbing up. Some go lickety-split up that hill, some have to shift into second. Some sputter and shake and slip back to the bottom again. Same cars, same gasoline, yet some make it and some don't. I say the fellows who can make the hill should stop and help those who can't. That's all I'm trying to do, help fellows who can't make the hill.â? âIt's like I see one fellow in a rowboat who's tired of rowing and wants a free ride, and another who's drowning. Who would you expect me to rescue? Mr. Cedar, who wants a free ride? Or those men who are drowning? Any 10-year-old child will give you the answer to that.â?

  • Oct 20, 2018

    Don't miss this movie

    Don't miss this movie

  • Sep 01, 2018

    Another Capra classic. One of the wealthiest men in the country dies and leaves his entire fortune to his nephew, Longfellow Deeds. Deeds is a simple, satisfied man of moderate means living in a small town. In an instant he is whisked to New York where he is waited on hand and foot and becomes the target for scammers, lawyers and publicity-seekers. Overwhelmed by the turn his life has taken, and awoken to another use for his new-found fortune, Mr. Deeds makes a momentous decision. Directed by the legendary Frank Capra, this has the Capra trademark features: the main character goes from nobody to somebody, and discovers it's not necessarily a good thing; there's the usual mountains of sentimentality that are laid on so thick and idealistically that they should backfire, but work out in the end. The sentimentality and idealism does come close to wrecking this movie. The start was good, with Gary Cooper playing the innocent, yet savvy, country hick perfectly. In the middle things got very schmaltzy and idealistic and I started to lose interest. However, the final third or so, the court scenes, was highly engaging, entertaining and profound, with a great conclusion, making it all worth while. The plot is very reminiscent of Mr. Smith Goes to Washington and Meet John Doe (which also starred Gary Cooper). Not as good as those two movies, due to the idealism and schmaltz overload in the middle, but a great movie nevertheless.

    Another Capra classic. One of the wealthiest men in the country dies and leaves his entire fortune to his nephew, Longfellow Deeds. Deeds is a simple, satisfied man of moderate means living in a small town. In an instant he is whisked to New York where he is waited on hand and foot and becomes the target for scammers, lawyers and publicity-seekers. Overwhelmed by the turn his life has taken, and awoken to another use for his new-found fortune, Mr. Deeds makes a momentous decision. Directed by the legendary Frank Capra, this has the Capra trademark features: the main character goes from nobody to somebody, and discovers it's not necessarily a good thing; there's the usual mountains of sentimentality that are laid on so thick and idealistically that they should backfire, but work out in the end. The sentimentality and idealism does come close to wrecking this movie. The start was good, with Gary Cooper playing the innocent, yet savvy, country hick perfectly. In the middle things got very schmaltzy and idealistic and I started to lose interest. However, the final third or so, the court scenes, was highly engaging, entertaining and profound, with a great conclusion, making it all worth while. The plot is very reminiscent of Mr. Smith Goes to Washington and Meet John Doe (which also starred Gary Cooper). Not as good as those two movies, due to the idealism and schmaltz overload in the middle, but a great movie nevertheless.

  • Feb 12, 2018

    Similar to Brewster's Millions, but with a Capra twist. Arthur & Cooper are at their best regardless of who else is in the shot.

    Similar to Brewster's Millions, but with a Capra twist. Arthur & Cooper are at their best regardless of who else is in the shot.

  • May 30, 2017

    I'm giving it 3 stars. Never saw or knew plot until watched it all 4-2017 on 'This TV'. Gary Cooper! Suddenly rich but still humble. FRANK CAPRA!

    I'm giving it 3 stars. Never saw or knew plot until watched it all 4-2017 on 'This TV'. Gary Cooper! Suddenly rich but still humble. FRANK CAPRA!

  • Dec 02, 2016

    Mr. Deeds Goes to Town is a pretty standard Frank Capra film. It's a simple story with likeable characters and an obvious moral of the story. Gary Cooper does a swell job of portraying Longfellow Deeds and Jean Arthur is absolutely charming. This is definitely more serious than the 2002 remake, but it's a well-made movie with plenty of heart.

    Mr. Deeds Goes to Town is a pretty standard Frank Capra film. It's a simple story with likeable characters and an obvious moral of the story. Gary Cooper does a swell job of portraying Longfellow Deeds and Jean Arthur is absolutely charming. This is definitely more serious than the 2002 remake, but it's a well-made movie with plenty of heart.