Much Ado About Nothing - Movie Reviews - Rotten Tomatoes

Much Ado About Nothing Reviews

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Lauren Carroll Harris
Concrete Playground
July 17, 2013
The Elizabethan speech rarely totally flows, the modern setting jars and not all the actors convince. It's as slick as you'd expect, if not a little forgettable. A frothy passion project.
Full Review | Original Score: 3
Witney Seibold
CraveOnline
June 7, 2013
These kids know the words, but not the music.
Full Review | Original Score: 5.5/10
Top Critic
Ben Sachs
Chicago Reader
June 21, 2013
This fast and loose independent production is enjoyable as a home movie, but not much more.
Top Critic
Alonso Duralde
TheWrap
June 3, 2013
While Acker successfully portrays a woman too smart and too strong to be shoved to the altar, Denisof never matches her fire. Without a Benedick that is up to her level, the inequity between the leads sinks the movie.
Robert Levin
amNewYork
June 9, 2013
The high-concept enterprise, which uses Shakespeare's original language, never justifies its existence.
Full Review | Original Score: 2.5/4
Chris Hewitt (St. Paul)
St. Paul Pioneer Press
June 20, 2013
Whatever else happens in "Much Ado," we need to believe there's something between Beatrice and Benedick and, here, that something feels like nothing.
Full Review | Original Score: 2.5/4
Dann Gire
Chicago Daily Herald
June 20, 2013
The more literal-minded medium of movies doesn't quite mesh 21st-century trappings with 15th-century references and titles. But effective actors can render these surface inconsistencies invisible, and there's the rub: They don't quite do it here.
Full Review | Original Score: 2.5/4
Cole Smithey
ColeSmithey.com
June 3, 2013
[VIDEO ESSAY] Josh Whedon's sophomoric attempt at swimming in Kenneth Brannagh's waters of expertise - namely adapting Shakespeare plays to film - is akin to watching a wet cat lick itself dry.
Full Review | Original Score: C-
Top Critic
Eric Kohn
indieWIRE
June 6, 2013
Call it a Shakespearean catharsis or just call it a lark -- either way, the movie represents Whedon's least essential work, regardless of the material's inherent comedic inspiration.
Full Review | Original Score: C+
Matt Pais
RedEye
June 20, 2013
Their tongues tangled by declarations unbeknownst to them, much of the cast of Joss Whedon's Shakespeare adaptation struggles to suggest they connect to what they're saying.
Full Review | Original Score: 2/4
Frederic and Mary Ann Brussat
Spirituality and Practice
June 7, 2013
This inept modern-day version of the classic Shakespearian comedy comes across as too contrived.
Full Review | Original Score: 2/5
Dennis Schwartz
Ozus' World Movie Reviews
July 8, 2013
Though it's not terrible, neither is it terribly good.
Full Review | Original Score: C+
Rich Cline
Shadows on the Wall
June 20, 2013
With its gently improvised tone and random slapstick, it's more of an intriguing idea than a successful film. And it only hints at the play's romance, humour and emotion.
Full Review | Original Score: 3/5
Top Critic
Steven Rea
Philadelphia Inquirer
June 21, 2013
There's no fire, and where their lines should ricochet with wit, they just spill forth, affably.
Full Review | Original Score: 2.5/4
Chris Cabin
Slant Magazine
June 3, 2013
The film is nothing without the physicality of the performers, as Joss Whedon's script handles the transition of Shakespeare's language to modern day indifferently.
Full Review | Original Score: 2/4
Top Critic
Keith Uhlich
Time Out
June 4, 2013
The movie feels like too much of a lark.
Full Review | Original Score: 3/5
Sean Burns
The Improper Bostonian
May 12, 2015
It's a private party, for Whedon fans only.
Todd Jorgenson
Cinemalogue.com
June 13, 2013
... too often feels like a calculated and ill-conceived exercise.
Mark Dujsik
Mark Reviews Movies
June 21, 2013
The spotlight on the text poses a problem ... in that only a few of the actors are a match for the language.
Full Review | Original Score: 2.5/4
Marshall Fine
Hollywood & Fine
June 5, 2013
Acker might as well be pitted against a body pillow, so shapeless and soft is Denisoff's presence.
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