My Young Auntie (Cheung booi) - Movie Reviews - Rotten Tomatoes

My Young Auntie (Cheung booi) Reviews

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July 17, 2016
Written and directed by Lau Kar Leung, this martial arts comedy is better than most. I'm typically not a fan of most martial arts comedies and find the comedy too broad and mostly just annoying. Kara Wai Ying Hung plays a young martial artist who agrees to marry an elderly landowner so that his fortunes won't fall to his greedy brother. When she inherits the fortune, the unscrupulous brother then does everything he can to steal away his brother's money. Kara Hui is quite good in the lead and does a fine job of carrying the film, while the buffoonish antics of the men around her nearly ruin the film. Lau Kar Leung gets the lion's share of credit for the film working, staging some terrific marital arts sequences. Although this was made in the early 80s, it feels like a rather old fashioned kung-fu action flick, but it's a pretty entertaining one.
August 18, 2011
Easily one of the best that the martial arts genre has to offer. With developed character, a little bit of humour, and a great story, My Young Auntie is a fantastic mix of action and laughs.

The three part action climax is also awe inspiring, with the four uncles helping to defeat a group of henchmen. Then they battle two fierce bodyguards, and it culminates into a final duel. It pretty much proves that in order for a martial arts movie to be great, you must have good characters and story to contain the fight scenes.
½ November 3, 2010
Divertissant dans l'ensemble pour un film de kung fu, mais il y a des longueurs.
October 27, 2010
It spends a peculiar amount of time establishing the odd relationship between the Auntie, her nephew (twenty years her senior) and grand nephew (about her age). There's great comedy, and the movie really picks up in the thirty minute assault on the Third Uncle's house. Gordon Liu shows up, but sadly he only dances and fights with a sword.
½ June 20, 2010
An unalloyed triumph of kung fu comedy. Kara Hui is a marvel to watch in action as she's known as the best Hong Kong heroine of early 1980s and she is also underrated in terms of beauty.
I see what actor-director-writer Chia Liang Liu has done with this film is really a pleasant surprise: he has taken a martial-arts plot and re-constructed it along the lines of a Hollywood-style musical! Complete with episodes of singing and dancing! It was around the time of the making of this film that some film-makers and film fans began to recognize that the cinematic performance of martial-arts (really derived from the acrobatics of the Chinese opera) has more in common with dance than with fighting.
The result is an incredibly charming entertainment, filled with marvelously human characters attempting miraculous kung fu.
deano
Super Reviewer
½ June 20, 2010
An unalloyed triumph of kung fu comedy. Kara Hui is a marvel to watch in action as she's known as the best Hong Kong heroine of early 1980s and she is also underrated in terms of beauty.
I see what actor-director-writer Chia Liang Liu has done with this film is really a pleasant surprise: he has taken a martial-arts plot and re-constructed it along the lines of a Hollywood-style musical! Complete with episodes of singing and dancing! It was around the time of the making of this film that some film-makers and film fans began to recognize that the cinematic performance of martial-arts (really derived from the acrobatics of the Chinese opera) has more in common with dance than with fighting.
The result is an incredibly charming entertainment, filled with marvelously human characters attempting miraculous kung fu.
May 19, 2010
Just like killing chickens

A dying man's last wish was to marry a young maiden. The young lady is reluctant at first. However, when she realizes her marriage may save the emperors empire she marries him. The dying emperor has a nephew and brother as possible benefactors. The emperor does not wish for his ruthless brother to have control of his empire, so he will leaves everything to the nephew. When the uncle discovers this he sends his lackeys to try to steal the will. The nephew, who is older then his new aunt, must first comprehend being the nephew to such a young lady, and then comprehend he is the ruler of an empire. The nephew has enough problems with his mischievous son, and his new, young, and attractive auntie seems to be causing more trouble then she's worth.

"Robinhood? Your archery needs some practice!"
"It's no good."
"Lousy."

Chia-Lung Liu, director of Drunken Master 2 & 3, Drunken Monkey, Instructors of Death, Eight Diagram Pole Fighter, Dirty Ho, Shaolin Challenges Ninja, and the Master Killer, directs My Young Auntie. My Young Auntie possesses a fun story and magnificent characters. The sets are brilliant and very appropriate for the film. Kara Hui won a best actress award for her role in this film. The choreography was brilliant in this picture, as most Chia-Lung Liu films are (as you can see by the resume above).

"If you call that stupid dance progressive, then I don't want to be progressive."

The conversation when the nephew picks up the aunt off the boat, fight at the carriage, hanging painting, shopping, Gordon Liu as a musician, costume party, sword fight at party, the booby traps, armpit hair, and the final fight between the nephew and uncle were my favorite portions of the film. I also enjoyed the props they utilized such as the hammer, ax, spear, and helmet.

"My daddy's changed; he's a girl."

Chia-Lung Liu is a marvelous director; and other then Drunken Monkey I have enjoyed all his films. The fact he directed, was the star, and was probably involved in the majority of the choreography in this film was amazing. He is also a wonderful actor, and his mix of humor in his films is stupendous. I strongly recommend watching this film, especially if you enjoyed Drunken Master 2. This is an underrated gem and it's a travesty this not a selectable film in RT.

"That stupid bitch is checking up on me."

Grade: A+
May 19, 2010
Old School Charmer! Love the humor
May 19, 2010
A entertaining and ridiculous Shaw brothers entry. Funny and action packed with neat fighting sequences.
May 19, 2010
The handful of sound effects being recycled endlessly gets repetitious. Some funny parts, but mostly cheesy.
½ May 19, 2010
I can imagine this being quite the gem of its day.
May 19, 2010
Classic martial arts fight sequences, and classic comedic performances. The vintage martial arts films are always the best. It's always fun to watch a woman dominate the male race.
May 19, 2010
The fight scenes are great, but the story and comedy relies on very specific cultural norms that are not present in the west. It's still funny in a slapstick way, but many of the more subtle things are lost on english audiences. Entertaining though!
January 21, 2009
I enjoyed the comedy in this campy Kung Fu Shaw flick. But the action is stale. In comparison to the other films in that area.
July 28, 2008
This Shaw Brothers action comedy takes it's time to get going, but the last 45 minutes is the real payoff, featuring some amazing fight sequences.
May 14, 2008
A pretty good action/comedy from Run Run Shaw and legendary director Chia-Liang Liu. I found it got better as it went along. I don't like scenes where misunderstanding is forced on characters to give the story somewhere to go, and this movie has plenty, especially with the spoiled brat Yu Tao, but I did a complete 180 on him by the time the movie hit its climax, which was a great series of fight scenes at the third uncle's house. There are a LOT of relatives in the plot and it was fun trying to keep it all straight, hehe.
May 4, 2008
Great dynamic between the teen and the auntie. If you're into Stephen Chow, this is a must see.
½ May 2, 2008
Corny But had some good fight scenes
½ April 14, 2008
A great kung-fu comedy (with the emphasis on comedy), this film rattles along with a delerious pace, on the way considering social and gender issues. My Young Auntie also heavily considers the Westernisation of China and Chinese identity, while never being less that great fun. Watch for a cameo by a be-wigged Godon Liu as a guitar playing student. Camp fun with loads to say.
November 28, 2007
amazingly campy, but many of these themes tend to recur in historical martial arts film of this genre, such as stephen chow's work
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