My Kid Could Paint That - Movie Reviews - Rotten Tomatoes

My Kid Could Paint That Reviews

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Top Critic
Bruce Westbrook
Houston Chronicle
October 19, 2007
A fascinating documentary.
Full Review | Original Score: 3/4
Top Critic
Roger Ebert
Chicago Sun-Times
October 19, 2007
The truth lurking beneath My Kid Could Paint That is that your kid couldn't paint that.
Full Review | Original Score: 3/4
Sean Axmaker
Seattle Post-Intelligencer
October 18, 2007
Like the best of the new wave of American documentaries, it becomes about far more than the human-interest angle at the center of the story...
Full Review | Original Score: A
Top Critic
Michael Phillips
Chicago Tribune
October 18, 2007
I've seen the film twice. It is a wonder, marked by a sense of wondrous skepticism that has nothing to do with cynicism.
| Original Score: 4/4
Harry Chotiner
culturevulture.net
October 17, 2007
My Kid Could Paint That
Top Critic
Richard Roeper
Ebert & Roeper
October 15, 2007
It's one of the best documentaries of this or any other year.
Urban Cinefile Critics
Urban Cinefile
October 13, 2007
... the storytelling is a little crude, the filming equally so, and in the end, audiences may feel that those who were prepared to pay thousands of dollars for one of Marla's paintings must be philosophical: if they love the work, the money is justified.
Top Critic
Kenneth Baker
San Francisco Chronicle
October 12, 2007
Bar-Lev goes to the heart of the issue -- that all art, but especially abstract art -- demands commitment on every side, but commitment takes many forms and has many motives behind it.
Full Review | Original Score: 3/4
Top Critic
Ty Burr
Boston Globe
October 12, 2007
For parents, My Kid Could Paint That functions as a mirror, prompting us to wonder at what point we should draw the line and close the door. When the national media camp out in our living rooms? When the kid's college account is full?
Full Review | Original Score: 3/4
Jeffrey M. Anderson
Combustible Celluloid
October 11, 2007
At every turn Bar-Lev very gently and fairly lays out the different sides of the story, and in doing so exposes bigger hypocrisies.
Full Review | Original Score: 3.5/4
Jeanne Aufmuth
Palo Alto Weekly
October 8, 2007
Maddening and more than a little thought-provoking.
| Original Score: 3/4
Laura Clifford
Reeling Reviews
October 6, 2007
...raises all kinds of questions and answers few, but I doubt any viewer could walk away without opinion. It's a well-structured, thought-provoking, even suspenseful piece of work.
Full Review | Original Score: A-
Top Critic
Joshua Rothkopf
Time Out
October 6, 2007
As cunning as a double-sided Kandinsky but ultimately as shallow as a few layers of oil.
| Original Score: 3/6
Tony Medley
tonymedley.com
October 5, 2007
Shows what happens when nice, naive people trust the media and people like Charlie Rose and director Amir Bar Levy. It isn't pretty, but it's interesting.
Full Review | Original Score: 7/10
October 5, 2007
Bar-Lev also explores the freakish popular appeal of child prodigies [and] the family dynamics that come into play when a child's celebrity and earning capacity overshadows the adults.'
Full Review | Original Score: 3.5/4
Timothy Knight
Reel.com
October 5, 2007
That Bar-Lev takes such care to depict them as complex, foible-laden individuals who can't be pegged either good or bad is one of the great strengths of this intriguing and provocative documentary.
| Original Score: 4/4
Top Critic
Noel Murray
AV Club
October 5, 2007
Bar-Lev is also intrigued by the ethereality of childhood, and whether nurturing a gift can also kill it.
| Original Score: A-
Top Critic
Kyle Smith
New York Post
October 5, 2007
The opportunities for a satirical comedy are largely missed by filmmaker Amir Bar-Lev, who does a lot of first-person hand-wringing about his methods. That is both a distraction and an indication that he got a little too close to his subjects.
Full Review | Original Score: 2.5/4
Top Critic
Elizabeth Weitzman
New York Daily News
October 5, 2007
Amir Bar-Lev began this documentary as a fairly straightforward portrait of a prodigy. What he ended up with was a complex examination of art, the media and the nature of fame.
Full Review | Original Score: 3/4
Annlee Ellingson
Boxoffice Magazine
October 5, 2007
As the story shifts from fanaticism to skepticism, Bar-Lev loses sight of his original line of inquiry on the nature of modern art when he doesn't need to.
Full Review | Original Score: 2.5/5
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