My Life as a Dog (Mitt Liv som Hund) Reviews

  • Aug 02, 2020

    It's a regular term to describe Lasse Hallström's films as timeless and unique, but My Life As A Dog truly fits that bill. One of the best portraits of children in film history, with all levels of emotion included. A masterpiece!

    It's a regular term to describe Lasse Hallström's films as timeless and unique, but My Life As A Dog truly fits that bill. One of the best portraits of children in film history, with all levels of emotion included. A masterpiece!

  • Apr 19, 2020

    My Life as a Dog, a catchy title that obviously inspired the 2016 film, My Life as a Courgette, which is probably my favourite stop-motion animation film, and which also another film that deals with themes of adolescence, and offers a portrait of childhood with its pains and consolations. What makes My Life as a Dog stand out as a coming-of-age story is how its protagonist, Ingemar, ponders over his sorrows, and how he ignores that he is a child in the first place. He desperately tries to find consolation in convincing himself his misfortunes pale in comparison to others', but ends up blaming himself and his childhood naivety. Shorn of its childhood aspect, this is a story about giving in to one's whims; about wasting the best moments of our lives; about feeling regret and guilt; and about how grief can mature us. I admit that the plot is a bit disorganized, there are moments that feel others familiar, and the pacing is a bit clunky. But, besides Cinema Paradiso, I don't think there's any film I've seen so far that gave me such evocative feels. These kind of movies that make you wallow in nostalgia as you watch them, no matter the experiences their characters go through are familiar to you or not. (8.5/10)

    My Life as a Dog, a catchy title that obviously inspired the 2016 film, My Life as a Courgette, which is probably my favourite stop-motion animation film, and which also another film that deals with themes of adolescence, and offers a portrait of childhood with its pains and consolations. What makes My Life as a Dog stand out as a coming-of-age story is how its protagonist, Ingemar, ponders over his sorrows, and how he ignores that he is a child in the first place. He desperately tries to find consolation in convincing himself his misfortunes pale in comparison to others', but ends up blaming himself and his childhood naivety. Shorn of its childhood aspect, this is a story about giving in to one's whims; about wasting the best moments of our lives; about feeling regret and guilt; and about how grief can mature us. I admit that the plot is a bit disorganized, there are moments that feel others familiar, and the pacing is a bit clunky. But, besides Cinema Paradiso, I don't think there's any film I've seen so far that gave me such evocative feels. These kind of movies that make you wallow in nostalgia as you watch them, no matter the experiences their characters go through are familiar to you or not. (8.5/10)

  • Mar 28, 2020

    This is one of the most moving films I've seen in my life. It is truly sublime. I've also read the memoir it is based on and enjoyed that, too.

    This is one of the most moving films I've seen in my life. It is truly sublime. I've also read the memoir it is based on and enjoyed that, too.

  • Feb 03, 2020

    Such a beautiful, emotionally-wrenching coming-of-age film. I saw it in a Washington DC cinema when it was released in 1985, and watched it again on DVD last year, 2019. It holds up. The liner notes for the DVD were written by Kurt Vonnegut, who praised it as his favourite film, or one of his favourite films. A very humanistic film.

    Such a beautiful, emotionally-wrenching coming-of-age film. I saw it in a Washington DC cinema when it was released in 1985, and watched it again on DVD last year, 2019. It holds up. The liner notes for the DVD were written by Kurt Vonnegut, who praised it as his favourite film, or one of his favourite films. A very humanistic film.

  • Dec 09, 2019

    Subtle. Sensitive. Beautiful.

    Subtle. Sensitive. Beautiful.

  • Dec 07, 2017

    I absolutely adore this Lasse Hallstrom movie about a little boy growing up in Sweden of the late 1950s-early 60s. It is charming and heartfelt without being schmaltzy and overly sentimental. It has delightfully funny episodes as young Ingemar is sent to live in the country with his uncle due to his mother being unable to cope with his pranks and the constant bickering between him and his brother, as her health steadily fails. Ingemar is constantly upbeat and often ponders on the fate of others, comparing his fate with theirs. His chief obsession is Laika, the dog that was sent into space by the USSR and he mourns her fate as he draws parallels between her life and his own. I've watched and rewatched this movie many times and it never fails to delight and move, bringing a smile to my face as the young boy experiences and tries to interpret the bizarre personalities and situations he founds himself surrounded by.

    I absolutely adore this Lasse Hallstrom movie about a little boy growing up in Sweden of the late 1950s-early 60s. It is charming and heartfelt without being schmaltzy and overly sentimental. It has delightfully funny episodes as young Ingemar is sent to live in the country with his uncle due to his mother being unable to cope with his pranks and the constant bickering between him and his brother, as her health steadily fails. Ingemar is constantly upbeat and often ponders on the fate of others, comparing his fate with theirs. His chief obsession is Laika, the dog that was sent into space by the USSR and he mourns her fate as he draws parallels between her life and his own. I've watched and rewatched this movie many times and it never fails to delight and move, bringing a smile to my face as the young boy experiences and tries to interpret the bizarre personalities and situations he founds himself surrounded by.

  • Dec 25, 2016

    An all time favorite, charing and moving.

    An all time favorite, charing and moving.

  • Nov 08, 2016

    Lasse Hallström's directorial debut is a pleasurably bittersweet reminiscence of a boy grappling with abandonment issues, sexual awakening and acceptance of death in the advent of losing his mother to tuberculosis.

    Lasse Hallström's directorial debut is a pleasurably bittersweet reminiscence of a boy grappling with abandonment issues, sexual awakening and acceptance of death in the advent of losing his mother to tuberculosis.

  • Aug 28, 2016

    This film about a child dealing with the hardships in an adult world, will tug on your heartstrings and make you reminisce about one's childhood

    This film about a child dealing with the hardships in an adult world, will tug on your heartstrings and make you reminisce about one's childhood

  • May 26, 2016

    Incredible pathos and rhythm. Firm grip from the first scene.

    Incredible pathos and rhythm. Firm grip from the first scene.