Mystic Ball Reviews

  • May 30, 2012

    Is Greg Hamilton lucky to be so obsessed with this 'sport' (perhaps lifestyle is more accurate) or is something missing in his life? Still, it is a beautiful film and thoroughly engaging.

    Is Greg Hamilton lucky to be so obsessed with this 'sport' (perhaps lifestyle is more accurate) or is something missing in his life? Still, it is a beautiful film and thoroughly engaging.

  • May 30, 2012

    The sport and the footage thereof was awesome. I did not really care for Greg Hamilton, which is too bad because he is in the whole thing. This movie made me feel fat and lazy.

    The sport and the footage thereof was awesome. I did not really care for Greg Hamilton, which is too bad because he is in the whole thing. This movie made me feel fat and lazy.

  • May 30, 2012

    The film is strongest when it is focusing on the Burmese Chinlone players. Greg Hamiliton's narration is at times quite annoying, and his own journey never seems as compelling as those of the other players that we only glimpse. That said by the end one finds oneself rooting for "Mr Greg" and happy that he has found joy in this sport, seeing as his life seems to have been missing something up until his discovery of it. What the movie does best is in shedding light on this aspect of Burmese culture. So often Burma is only looked at in terms of its oppressive government, and it is important to see the joy and the love that the Burmese are able to find in life.

    The film is strongest when it is focusing on the Burmese Chinlone players. Greg Hamiliton's narration is at times quite annoying, and his own journey never seems as compelling as those of the other players that we only glimpse. That said by the end one finds oneself rooting for "Mr Greg" and happy that he has found joy in this sport, seeing as his life seems to have been missing something up until his discovery of it. What the movie does best is in shedding light on this aspect of Burmese culture. So often Burma is only looked at in terms of its oppressive government, and it is important to see the joy and the love that the Burmese are able to find in life.

  • May 30, 2012

    A deeply enriching experience! Follow this Toronto man's social and spiritual journey through his meditative process mastering the demanding physical skill in the game/dance of Myanmar's traditional sport of chinlone! Magic on so many levels.

    A deeply enriching experience! Follow this Toronto man's social and spiritual journey through his meditative process mastering the demanding physical skill in the game/dance of Myanmar's traditional sport of chinlone! Magic on so many levels.

  • May 30, 2012

    last movie that made me well up

    last movie that made me well up

  • May 30, 2012

    Great documentary on the Chinlo sport of Myanmar. Great visuals and personal/sports story from a fellow Torontonian.

    Great documentary on the Chinlo sport of Myanmar. Great visuals and personal/sports story from a fellow Torontonian.

  • May 30, 2012

    In Myanmar, an obscure sport called 'Chinlone' is played there obsessively. This film follows one man's discovery and infatuation with the pastime. This 'Sport' (although I totally dispute this claim) is very similar to hackysack (although the director disputes THAT claim too, he doesn't mention it in the movie) except it's done with a larger lighter, hollow-sized, volleyball shaped ball. The art of bouncing it around with your feet is tricky, and is all quite interesting, and the tourney Myanmar has for this is really quite spectacular, as with the images of the country itself. but the film gets bogged down from the tepid children's sing-song narration, done by the director himself EG "I was soooo tired! It was sooo beautiful!" I don't know, I didn't like the film as much as other people it seems, I think this one is just a touch overrated.

    In Myanmar, an obscure sport called 'Chinlone' is played there obsessively. This film follows one man's discovery and infatuation with the pastime. This 'Sport' (although I totally dispute this claim) is very similar to hackysack (although the director disputes THAT claim too, he doesn't mention it in the movie) except it's done with a larger lighter, hollow-sized, volleyball shaped ball. The art of bouncing it around with your feet is tricky, and is all quite interesting, and the tourney Myanmar has for this is really quite spectacular, as with the images of the country itself. but the film gets bogged down from the tepid children's sing-song narration, done by the director himself EG "I was soooo tired! It was sooo beautiful!" I don't know, I didn't like the film as much as other people it seems, I think this one is just a touch overrated.

  • May 30, 2012

    Unbelievable talent in this game. Average narratin brings it down a peg.

    Unbelievable talent in this game. Average narratin brings it down a peg.

  • Jul 27, 2007

    [img]http://buzznet-73.vo.llnwd.net/assets/users16/wisekwai/default/MYSTIC_BALL_2--large-msg-118560039574.jpg[/img] [url="http://www.mysticball-themovie.com/"]Mystic Ball[/url] is a 2006 documentary film directed by and starring Greg Hamilton, chronicling the Canadian man's two-decades-long obsession with a Burmese sport-artform called [url="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chinlone"]chinlone[/url]. Played six players in a circular ring, using their feet to pass each other a cane ball that is perhaps six inches in diameter, it is described as non-competitive sport that is only about completing the most beautiful moves possible. Originally conceived as a documentary about chinlone, the documentary morphed into becoming a movie about Hamilton, a Canadian of Africa-American-Irish descent who grew up in foster homes and was bullied and picked on during his childhood. He obtained a background in martial arts, but one day during the 1980s in Toronto, he saw a Burmese immigrant playing chinlone, and from there became steadily obsessed with learning the game. It is a journey that has taken him from Canada to Myanmar many times, and has made him famous in Myanmar as the only foreigner to participate in chinlone, which is only played in Myanmar. Similar forms of chilone exist. In Thailand and other southeast Asian countries, there is sepak takraw, which is a competitive sport played by teams on either side of a net, like volleyball. There's also a circle form of takraw, but it is not the same as chinlone. Though Hamilton takes center stage, a move that Hamilton says was necessary for him to find backers in the West and help foreign audiences relate to the film, the documentary does a good job of presenting the Myanmar players who are the best in the game. These include the incredible Su Su Llaing, who is also a chilone soloist, performing acrobat feats and balancing, all while bouncing a ball on the top of her feet. Ultimately, the goal for Hamilton is to spread word about chilone to the world outside Myanmar, and possibly form an international tour of Myanmar's top chinlone practitioners.

    [img]http://buzznet-73.vo.llnwd.net/assets/users16/wisekwai/default/MYSTIC_BALL_2--large-msg-118560039574.jpg[/img] [url="http://www.mysticball-themovie.com/"]Mystic Ball[/url] is a 2006 documentary film directed by and starring Greg Hamilton, chronicling the Canadian man's two-decades-long obsession with a Burmese sport-artform called [url="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chinlone"]chinlone[/url]. Played six players in a circular ring, using their feet to pass each other a cane ball that is perhaps six inches in diameter, it is described as non-competitive sport that is only about completing the most beautiful moves possible. Originally conceived as a documentary about chinlone, the documentary morphed into becoming a movie about Hamilton, a Canadian of Africa-American-Irish descent who grew up in foster homes and was bullied and picked on during his childhood. He obtained a background in martial arts, but one day during the 1980s in Toronto, he saw a Burmese immigrant playing chinlone, and from there became steadily obsessed with learning the game. It is a journey that has taken him from Canada to Myanmar many times, and has made him famous in Myanmar as the only foreigner to participate in chinlone, which is only played in Myanmar. Similar forms of chilone exist. In Thailand and other southeast Asian countries, there is sepak takraw, which is a competitive sport played by teams on either side of a net, like volleyball. There's also a circle form of takraw, but it is not the same as chinlone. Though Hamilton takes center stage, a move that Hamilton says was necessary for him to find backers in the West and help foreign audiences relate to the film, the documentary does a good job of presenting the Myanmar players who are the best in the game. These include the incredible Su Su Llaing, who is also a chilone soloist, performing acrobat feats and balancing, all while bouncing a ball on the top of her feet. Ultimately, the goal for Hamilton is to spread word about chilone to the world outside Myanmar, and possibly form an international tour of Myanmar's top chinlone practitioners.