Nosferatu, a Symphony of Horror (Nosferatu, eine Symphonie des Grauens) (Nosferatu the Vampire) - Movie Reviews - Rotten Tomatoes

Nosferatu, a Symphony of Horror (Nosferatu, eine Symphonie des Grauens) (Nosferatu the Vampire) Reviews

Top Critic
Tom Huddleston
Time Out
October 14, 2014
So this is it: ground zero, the birth of horror cinema.
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Mordaunt Hall
New York Times
August 21, 2013
It is the sort of thing one could watch at midnight without its having much effect upon one's slumbering hours.
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Kevin Thomas
Los Angeles Times
August 21, 2013
Never mind that much of the story of this first important screen version of the Dracula legend seems corny and dated, for what counts is its atmosphere and its images, which are timeless in their power.
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Dennis Lim
Los Angeles Times
August 21, 2013
Less frightening than haunting, Murnau's film conjures a persistent atmosphere of dread and decay, thanks in part to Max Schreck's immortal performance as Orlok.
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Michael Wilmington
Chicago Tribune
August 21, 2013
It's not just a great horror movie. It's a poem of horror, a symphony of dread, a film so rapt, mysterious and weirdly lovely it haunts the mind long after it's over.
Full Review | Original Score: 4/4
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Richard Brody
New Yorker
August 21, 2013
The metaphysical style is most vividly rendered by Murnau's obsessive use of point-of-view shots, which force a viewer to follow the characters into the abyss of their terrifying visions.
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Variety Staff
Variety
May 16, 2008
Murnau proved his directorial artistry in Sunrise for Fox about three years earlier, but in this picture he's a master artisan demonstrating not only a knowledge of the subtler side of directing but in photography.
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Jonathan Rosenbaum
Chicago Reader
September 19, 2007
The film shows Murnau's uncanny mixture of expressionism and location shooting at its finest.
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Dave Kehr
Chicago Reader
September 19, 2007
A masterpiece of the German silent cinema and easily the most effective version of Dracula on record.
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Geoff Andrew
Time Out
August 16, 2007
Murnau's classic vampire movie, though not his best film, remains one of the most poetic of all horror films.
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James Berardinelli
ReelViews
January 1, 2000
As vampire movies go, few are more memorable than Nosferatu, which is not only the first screen version of Dracula, but, in some ways, remains the best.
Full Review | Original Score: 3.5/4
Top Critic
Roger Ebert
Chicago Sun-Times
January 1, 2000
It doesn't scare us, but it haunts us. It shows not that vampires can jump out of shadows, but that evil can grow there, nourished on death.
Full Review | Original Score: 4/4