Notes Towards an African Orestes (Appunti per un'Orestiade africana) Reviews

  • Apr 26, 2009

    je ne sais pas si je prendrais la chanteuse, mais en tous cas, je garderai les paroles

    je ne sais pas si je prendrais la chanteuse, mais en tous cas, je garderai les paroles

  • Mar 28, 2008

    Rather than making a narrative feature, Pasolini creates a filmic notebook of metaphors he would like to use in a potential movie linking the Greek mythological birth of democracy to post-colonial Africa. This highly original premise allows him to ingeniously criticize both the European colonialists whose trading and sovereignty kept African countries economically limited as well as the contradictory process of modern African democratization, which, as he sees it, creates a new class division. Using recurring Russian revolutionary music, it becomes apparent that to Pasolini, the true modernization of Africa (post-tribalism) should be one that embraces unification, instead of the distinction between the common people and those privileged enough to attend Western-style university. His "notes", then, that use metaphor readily embraceable by the European inteligencia, and that celebrate the humanity of the African people while questioning their system's burgeoning capitalism, are a brilliant commentary, prescient of the many issues of third-world development that still exist today in our age of globalization. Also, Flixster's got the year wrong on this one. It was made in 1970. Pasolini couldn't have possibly made it in 1981 because he was dead 6 years earlier.

    Rather than making a narrative feature, Pasolini creates a filmic notebook of metaphors he would like to use in a potential movie linking the Greek mythological birth of democracy to post-colonial Africa. This highly original premise allows him to ingeniously criticize both the European colonialists whose trading and sovereignty kept African countries economically limited as well as the contradictory process of modern African democratization, which, as he sees it, creates a new class division. Using recurring Russian revolutionary music, it becomes apparent that to Pasolini, the true modernization of Africa (post-tribalism) should be one that embraces unification, instead of the distinction between the common people and those privileged enough to attend Western-style university. His "notes", then, that use metaphor readily embraceable by the European inteligencia, and that celebrate the humanity of the African people while questioning their system's burgeoning capitalism, are a brilliant commentary, prescient of the many issues of third-world development that still exist today in our age of globalization. Also, Flixster's got the year wrong on this one. It was made in 1970. Pasolini couldn't have possibly made it in 1981 because he was dead 6 years earlier.