Reviews

  • Jan 11, 2015

    An effort of warmongering by people like Daniel Pipes. Palestinian issue, or any other secondary socio-economic, historical issue is not synonymous with Islam or jihad. Such issues have complex reasons and manifestations. It is not just, exclusionary a matter of faith, religion, theological dispute. Consider reaction against modernity, imperialism, racism, etc. If you really want to stop those terrorist networks, you must severe your lucrative ties with oil-rich feudal states.

    An effort of warmongering by people like Daniel Pipes. Palestinian issue, or any other secondary socio-economic, historical issue is not synonymous with Islam or jihad. Such issues have complex reasons and manifestations. It is not just, exclusionary a matter of faith, religion, theological dispute. Consider reaction against modernity, imperialism, racism, etc. If you really want to stop those terrorist networks, you must severe your lucrative ties with oil-rich feudal states.

  • Aug 16, 2013

    A very good insight on radical Islam and also makes sure to put positive light on the Muslim people as a whole.

    A very good insight on radical Islam and also makes sure to put positive light on the Muslim people as a whole.

  • Jun 26, 2012

    (Spoiler Alert) This film is a 2005 documentary about the threat of radical Islam in our world today. It does this primarily by using extensive Arab television footage as a means to give us an âinsider viewâ? of the radical views Islam extremists have and preach/incite in their campaign of holy war or âjihadâ?. Many parallels are also made between radical Islam and the Nazi campaign in World War II to exterminate the Jews. One of the most profound messages in the documentary is stated in the beginning as, âThis is a film about radical Islamic terror. A dangerous ideology, fueled by religious hatred. It's important to remember most Muslims are peaceful and do not support terror. This is not a film about them. This is a film about a radical worldview, and the threat it poses to us all, Muslim and non-Muslim alike." It is fundamentally important that Americans and the rest of the world make the distinction between ordinary Muslims and Islam extremists. Most Muslims are not responsible for the Islamic acts of terrorist that have taken place in our world today. These attacks happen only because Muslim fundamentalists interpret the Quâ(TM)ran in their own convoluted way and henceforth use their religion to justify extreme acts of violence and hatred. What is also fundamentally important to be known is that Islam is a religion of love and peace, not the culture of hostility and brutality that is so over portrayed in the Western media. However, this documentary also conveys a cautionary tone. It warns that within the Muslim faith (with a population of 1 billion people), about 10% to 15% of followers believe in or are willing to engage in and conduct acts of extremism and fundamentalism. More than that, these individuals are spread evenly all over the world as opposed to being concentrated in one geographic location, making it more difficult to combat any potential acts of extremism or terrorism should they arise. The film warns that the Anti-American followers consist of an even greater portion of the Muslim faith population. There is a conviction amongst Muslim fundamentalists that the West (United States, Great Britain, etc) is engaged in a conspiracy to subjugate Islam. Henceforth, by their logic, every honorable Muslim and non-Muslim must stand against the West and Israel. Muslim extremists believe that their Jihad is to conquer the world for Allah. Unlike Buddhist followers, who tolerates all manners of faith and religions, Muslim extremists see Islam as against all religions because it is the one and only worthy worship. In a coordinated effort of intolerance, Muslim extremism has permeated the media and used various forms of propaganda to demonize Westerners and Jews. But why else is extremism and fundamentalism so prevalent in Muslim societies? One theory explored in this documentary is that Arab dictators are inciting Muslims to direct their anger and hatred toward Western societies. Using Western societies as a scapegoat, Arab dictators hope that the general Muslim population would think that the societal problems and abuses are perpetuated by the West and not by the dictators themselves. Uniting the Muslim population against a common foreign enemy allows them to stay in power. These dictators claim that the real enemy is modernism because it contradicts Sharia law. Also, by upholding Sharia law, dictators effectively prevent any chances of upward societal mobility and progression where equal rights and opportunities may be open for all. Because this documentary was filmed in 2005 (7 years ago), the legitimacy and relevance of the content in this film should be questioned accordingly. The timestamps of most Arab television footage is pre-2004. However, though the dangers of Islamic terrorism may be not as prevalent or relevant as they were prior to 9/11 or during the peak of the Post Iraq War invasion, the United States nonetheless has a continuing obligation to look after itâ(TM)s civilians and protect them from enemies both domestic and abroad. The Christmas Day bombing of 2009 shows that despite technological advances, Muslim extremists will continue to seek ways to destabilize the American way of life and endanger if not exterminate the lives of Americans whenever the opportunity arises. The fundamental differences between Muslim and extremistsâ¦One instance is the differing interpretations of the Muslim word âJihadâ?. To Muslim radicals, this term implies a sacred and holy war fought against infidels, primarily the United States and Israel, in the name of Allah. For most Muslims however, the term implies an inner struggle to look within you and make yourself a better person (in Arabic). This interpretation is one among many of how Muslim radicals perceive religious texts and themes differently from traditional Muslims. Personally, I believe that this documentary is rather biased or Islamophobic and is more politically oriented as opposed to educating the general population about the presence and causes of radical Islam today. The release of the documentary suggests a post Iraq war agenda for the United States, suggested subtly by the widespread distribution of this film in swing states of the United States prior to the 2008 presidential elections. Overall, I would recommend this film to anyone curious enough to check it out but not deem it absolutely necessary to watch.

    (Spoiler Alert) This film is a 2005 documentary about the threat of radical Islam in our world today. It does this primarily by using extensive Arab television footage as a means to give us an âinsider viewâ? of the radical views Islam extremists have and preach/incite in their campaign of holy war or âjihadâ?. Many parallels are also made between radical Islam and the Nazi campaign in World War II to exterminate the Jews. One of the most profound messages in the documentary is stated in the beginning as, âThis is a film about radical Islamic terror. A dangerous ideology, fueled by religious hatred. It's important to remember most Muslims are peaceful and do not support terror. This is not a film about them. This is a film about a radical worldview, and the threat it poses to us all, Muslim and non-Muslim alike." It is fundamentally important that Americans and the rest of the world make the distinction between ordinary Muslims and Islam extremists. Most Muslims are not responsible for the Islamic acts of terrorist that have taken place in our world today. These attacks happen only because Muslim fundamentalists interpret the Quâ(TM)ran in their own convoluted way and henceforth use their religion to justify extreme acts of violence and hatred. What is also fundamentally important to be known is that Islam is a religion of love and peace, not the culture of hostility and brutality that is so over portrayed in the Western media. However, this documentary also conveys a cautionary tone. It warns that within the Muslim faith (with a population of 1 billion people), about 10% to 15% of followers believe in or are willing to engage in and conduct acts of extremism and fundamentalism. More than that, these individuals are spread evenly all over the world as opposed to being concentrated in one geographic location, making it more difficult to combat any potential acts of extremism or terrorism should they arise. The film warns that the Anti-American followers consist of an even greater portion of the Muslim faith population. There is a conviction amongst Muslim fundamentalists that the West (United States, Great Britain, etc) is engaged in a conspiracy to subjugate Islam. Henceforth, by their logic, every honorable Muslim and non-Muslim must stand against the West and Israel. Muslim extremists believe that their Jihad is to conquer the world for Allah. Unlike Buddhist followers, who tolerates all manners of faith and religions, Muslim extremists see Islam as against all religions because it is the one and only worthy worship. In a coordinated effort of intolerance, Muslim extremism has permeated the media and used various forms of propaganda to demonize Westerners and Jews. But why else is extremism and fundamentalism so prevalent in Muslim societies? One theory explored in this documentary is that Arab dictators are inciting Muslims to direct their anger and hatred toward Western societies. Using Western societies as a scapegoat, Arab dictators hope that the general Muslim population would think that the societal problems and abuses are perpetuated by the West and not by the dictators themselves. Uniting the Muslim population against a common foreign enemy allows them to stay in power. These dictators claim that the real enemy is modernism because it contradicts Sharia law. Also, by upholding Sharia law, dictators effectively prevent any chances of upward societal mobility and progression where equal rights and opportunities may be open for all. Because this documentary was filmed in 2005 (7 years ago), the legitimacy and relevance of the content in this film should be questioned accordingly. The timestamps of most Arab television footage is pre-2004. However, though the dangers of Islamic terrorism may be not as prevalent or relevant as they were prior to 9/11 or during the peak of the Post Iraq War invasion, the United States nonetheless has a continuing obligation to look after itâ(TM)s civilians and protect them from enemies both domestic and abroad. The Christmas Day bombing of 2009 shows that despite technological advances, Muslim extremists will continue to seek ways to destabilize the American way of life and endanger if not exterminate the lives of Americans whenever the opportunity arises. The fundamental differences between Muslim and extremistsâ¦One instance is the differing interpretations of the Muslim word âJihadâ?. To Muslim radicals, this term implies a sacred and holy war fought against infidels, primarily the United States and Israel, in the name of Allah. For most Muslims however, the term implies an inner struggle to look within you and make yourself a better person (in Arabic). This interpretation is one among many of how Muslim radicals perceive religious texts and themes differently from traditional Muslims. Personally, I believe that this documentary is rather biased or Islamophobic and is more politically oriented as opposed to educating the general population about the presence and causes of radical Islam today. The release of the documentary suggests a post Iraq war agenda for the United States, suggested subtly by the widespread distribution of this film in swing states of the United States prior to the 2008 presidential elections. Overall, I would recommend this film to anyone curious enough to check it out but not deem it absolutely necessary to watch.

  • Jan 14, 2012

    A must see--grim, but we need to quit living in denial.

    A must see--grim, but we need to quit living in denial.

  • Nov 25, 2009

    A dire warning documentary that sounds off a call to action.

    A dire warning documentary that sounds off a call to action.

  • Sep 30, 2009

    A great documentary that puts in black and white why we Americans should take Radical Islam more seriously then we do.

    A great documentary that puts in black and white why we Americans should take Radical Islam more seriously then we do.

  • May 18, 2009

    "Obsession: Radical Islam's War Against the West" is the ideal complement to Bryan Daly and Gregory M. Davis's "Islam: What the West Needs to Know", because each of these two films provides what the other lacks, and together they help form a reasoned a documented understanding of the islamic threat to the West. While "Islam..." is stronger on the theory, "Obsession" is better at documenting the factual claims of its talking heads, almost systematically providing one or more extracts from the muslim media to show that however far-fetched or exaggerated they might seem, these claims are the literal truth. When interviewees say, for instance, that in muslim countries, little children are brainwashed into a murderous hatred of Jews, Americans and British, the film shows you TV clips where a cute twelve-year old girl says: "I hope Bush dies in flames and I want to go to Ariel Sharon and kill him with a gun and stab him", or a 3 1/2 year old asserts that Jews are all "pigs and apes", and it says so in the Koran. As a collection of video documents on radical Islam's hatred of western civilisation, therefore, this is an excellent film. But I thought it had at least three weaknesses. First, it tries too hard and with too little evidence to present the broad majority of the world's more than one billion muslims as peace-loving opponents of radical Islam's agenda. This may be true, and the very speculative figure of 85% disagreement with the jihadist agenda may be correct (though this still represents the equivalent of the population of the US worldwide sympathising with the terrorists, as Walid Shoebat remarks), but I think the issue should not be left to charitable and potentially naive guesswork. Given the well-documented pervasiveness of radical propaganda in the muslim media and educational systems, it strikes me as odd that they such propaganda should fail to win over more than a small fraction of its target audience. Moreover, the film does not address a more urgent question, which "Islam..." successfully tackles: even admitting that the majority of muslims actually oppose jihad, is that majority right about what their religion teaches, or are the radicals? Maybe the Western "democratic" habit of rule by numbers makes many people miss the importance of that question. Second, the film spends a little too much time drawing parallels with Nazi Germany. The historical reminder of the then Mufti of Jerusalem, Haj Amin Al-Husseini's collaboration with Adolf Hitler was important, and the recycling of antisemitic nazi imagery by the PLO was also quite telling. But I think the heavy insistence on Hitler made the film lose its focus by pandering to primarily Jewish fears (Kopping himself is Jewish, as are several of the interviewees, while "Islam..." was more of a Christian film.) And third, "Obsession" failed to notice the theological dimensions of the islamic hatred of the West showing even in its own clips. When churches are shown being desecrated by muslim soldiers, with crosses being shot at or torn down, the message is: protecting the Jews now is important because goyim will be next (the Jews are only a "prologue", one of the interviewees says.) But I think Islam's theology is much more in conflict with (genuine) Christianity than with Judaism. Judaism and Islam share the same unitarianism, i.e. the idea that God is one person, while in muslim eyes, true (Trinitarian) Christians are guilty of polytheism (an accusation branded in one of the clips, but no commented upon) or "associationism", i.e. the veneration of God together with something else, such as the Son and the Holy Spirit. If you do not get that, you will not understand one of the statements made by one of the radical muslims in the film: "America is the enemy of God's unity." This is a theological accusation. Muslims hate the West not primarily because we are morally degenerate (and we are, and this probably does contribute to their hatred), but because those of us who are more than nominal Christians are Trinitarians, a heresy that deserves death. In a modern context, the often heard chant "there is no God but Allah" probably means essentially that Jesus is not God (he's just a guy, another prophet, superseded by the last one, Muhammad himself), nor is the Holy Spirit. To borrow statements from the radical muslims in the film: "The Christians are Kuffar [non-believers]... No Kuffar are innocent"; "Allah is happy when Kuffar get killed." Despite these criticisms, I think the film deserves to be seen by many. Jewish audiences will be much more attuned to its message, but I think anybody can learn a lot from it, and together with "Islam: What the West Needs to Know", it builds up a very powerful case indeed for a genuine concern with the worldwide muslim threat. www.obsessionthemovie.com

    "Obsession: Radical Islam's War Against the West" is the ideal complement to Bryan Daly and Gregory M. Davis's "Islam: What the West Needs to Know", because each of these two films provides what the other lacks, and together they help form a reasoned a documented understanding of the islamic threat to the West. While "Islam..." is stronger on the theory, "Obsession" is better at documenting the factual claims of its talking heads, almost systematically providing one or more extracts from the muslim media to show that however far-fetched or exaggerated they might seem, these claims are the literal truth. When interviewees say, for instance, that in muslim countries, little children are brainwashed into a murderous hatred of Jews, Americans and British, the film shows you TV clips where a cute twelve-year old girl says: "I hope Bush dies in flames and I want to go to Ariel Sharon and kill him with a gun and stab him", or a 3 1/2 year old asserts that Jews are all "pigs and apes", and it says so in the Koran. As a collection of video documents on radical Islam's hatred of western civilisation, therefore, this is an excellent film. But I thought it had at least three weaknesses. First, it tries too hard and with too little evidence to present the broad majority of the world's more than one billion muslims as peace-loving opponents of radical Islam's agenda. This may be true, and the very speculative figure of 85% disagreement with the jihadist agenda may be correct (though this still represents the equivalent of the population of the US worldwide sympathising with the terrorists, as Walid Shoebat remarks), but I think the issue should not be left to charitable and potentially naive guesswork. Given the well-documented pervasiveness of radical propaganda in the muslim media and educational systems, it strikes me as odd that they such propaganda should fail to win over more than a small fraction of its target audience. Moreover, the film does not address a more urgent question, which "Islam..." successfully tackles: even admitting that the majority of muslims actually oppose jihad, is that majority right about what their religion teaches, or are the radicals? Maybe the Western "democratic" habit of rule by numbers makes many people miss the importance of that question. Second, the film spends a little too much time drawing parallels with Nazi Germany. The historical reminder of the then Mufti of Jerusalem, Haj Amin Al-Husseini's collaboration with Adolf Hitler was important, and the recycling of antisemitic nazi imagery by the PLO was also quite telling. But I think the heavy insistence on Hitler made the film lose its focus by pandering to primarily Jewish fears (Kopping himself is Jewish, as are several of the interviewees, while "Islam..." was more of a Christian film.) And third, "Obsession" failed to notice the theological dimensions of the islamic hatred of the West showing even in its own clips. When churches are shown being desecrated by muslim soldiers, with crosses being shot at or torn down, the message is: protecting the Jews now is important because goyim will be next (the Jews are only a "prologue", one of the interviewees says.) But I think Islam's theology is much more in conflict with (genuine) Christianity than with Judaism. Judaism and Islam share the same unitarianism, i.e. the idea that God is one person, while in muslim eyes, true (Trinitarian) Christians are guilty of polytheism (an accusation branded in one of the clips, but no commented upon) or "associationism", i.e. the veneration of God together with something else, such as the Son and the Holy Spirit. If you do not get that, you will not understand one of the statements made by one of the radical muslims in the film: "America is the enemy of God's unity." This is a theological accusation. Muslims hate the West not primarily because we are morally degenerate (and we are, and this probably does contribute to their hatred), but because those of us who are more than nominal Christians are Trinitarians, a heresy that deserves death. In a modern context, the often heard chant "there is no God but Allah" probably means essentially that Jesus is not God (he's just a guy, another prophet, superseded by the last one, Muhammad himself), nor is the Holy Spirit. To borrow statements from the radical muslims in the film: "The Christians are Kuffar [non-believers]... No Kuffar are innocent"; "Allah is happy when Kuffar get killed." Despite these criticisms, I think the film deserves to be seen by many. Jewish audiences will be much more attuned to its message, but I think anybody can learn a lot from it, and together with "Islam: What the West Needs to Know", it builds up a very powerful case indeed for a genuine concern with the worldwide muslim threat. www.obsessionthemovie.com

  • May 05, 2009

    Very interesting film about how radical Islam views the western world.

    Very interesting film about how radical Islam views the western world.

  • Mar 21, 2009

    The year's best comedy!

    The year's best comedy!

  • Mar 09, 2009

    Very enlightening. The similarities of Nazism and radical Islam and their origin is uncanny. Hearing from former Hitler Youth officer Alfons Heck and former PLO Terrorist Walid Shoelbat and their warnings made everything so much clearer. Everybody needs to see this movie.

    Very enlightening. The similarities of Nazism and radical Islam and their origin is uncanny. Hearing from former Hitler Youth officer Alfons Heck and former PLO Terrorist Walid Shoelbat and their warnings made everything so much clearer. Everybody needs to see this movie.