One Week and a Day (Shavua ve Yom) Reviews

  • Nov 04, 2017

    Losing the loved one and getting lost in the life. The plot says it is a serious subject, but the film was fun. Not fun as you would laugh out loud, though that's how the characters behaves. As seen the whole film, I thought it was similar to the 'Sweet Bean'. Not thematically, but the characteristically. They did not balance on that, because clearly that was not an intention. It's only I saw that, which should have been explored much better possible way. You might wonder what is that! Actually, it was three generations. A kid, a young man and a pretty close to be an old man. But it was that old man's tale. That's how it all begins and ends too. He had lost his son and now it is a week of mourning time. At the end of the formal, that's where our tale begins by avoiding the emotional parts. A good initiation. Seems he is approaching a different tactic to cope with the loss. Suddenly his behaviour has changed. Not being polite with everyone around him, particularly his neighbour couple with a reason. But their young son joins him, together they set to break the rules and do some crazy stuffs. At the last moment, a kid joins them and it all turns out their greatest day of adventure. All the fun has an ending, so how does it concludes was told with a little dramatic. ?The fact that you can't see it does not mean it does not exist. You're just not open minded enough.? I have seen many films about coping with the deaths. Some of them were unique, some were not. This was a familiar one, except all the events were set in a different atmosphere, like culture and society. It is people's nature, tend to do opposite when they are not ready for it or forced to do. This father did not intentionally took that alternative route. It was a chain of events, he just sailed from one to another, only to realise where and how far he had come. More or less, like a self-discovery. Rediscovering the life to live for. Some time emotions take us to unexpected destinations. But once it was released, the reality eyes open, to look forward in the remaining life. So this film was not an ideal film for everybody who are in the same situation. But it gives a different opinion. I liked the actors, all the main ones. The music was so good. It was one of the main ingredients of the film, made everything look better. Particularly in the transition sections between the events and the characters. Don't remember what was my last Hebrew film, but it was a good one, had a nice time. The developments, how the plots were extended is not going to satisfy all who watches the film. Because some viewers might expect a totally fun, with or without logic. But some look for the value it teaches, morale, message et cetera. Frankly, this film was none of those. But it was also all of those with less highlighting them. Better than the average, and below the awesomeness, surely a worthy film that some people would find it good. 7/10

    Losing the loved one and getting lost in the life. The plot says it is a serious subject, but the film was fun. Not fun as you would laugh out loud, though that's how the characters behaves. As seen the whole film, I thought it was similar to the 'Sweet Bean'. Not thematically, but the characteristically. They did not balance on that, because clearly that was not an intention. It's only I saw that, which should have been explored much better possible way. You might wonder what is that! Actually, it was three generations. A kid, a young man and a pretty close to be an old man. But it was that old man's tale. That's how it all begins and ends too. He had lost his son and now it is a week of mourning time. At the end of the formal, that's where our tale begins by avoiding the emotional parts. A good initiation. Seems he is approaching a different tactic to cope with the loss. Suddenly his behaviour has changed. Not being polite with everyone around him, particularly his neighbour couple with a reason. But their young son joins him, together they set to break the rules and do some crazy stuffs. At the last moment, a kid joins them and it all turns out their greatest day of adventure. All the fun has an ending, so how does it concludes was told with a little dramatic. ?The fact that you can't see it does not mean it does not exist. You're just not open minded enough.? I have seen many films about coping with the deaths. Some of them were unique, some were not. This was a familiar one, except all the events were set in a different atmosphere, like culture and society. It is people's nature, tend to do opposite when they are not ready for it or forced to do. This father did not intentionally took that alternative route. It was a chain of events, he just sailed from one to another, only to realise where and how far he had come. More or less, like a self-discovery. Rediscovering the life to live for. Some time emotions take us to unexpected destinations. But once it was released, the reality eyes open, to look forward in the remaining life. So this film was not an ideal film for everybody who are in the same situation. But it gives a different opinion. I liked the actors, all the main ones. The music was so good. It was one of the main ingredients of the film, made everything look better. Particularly in the transition sections between the events and the characters. Don't remember what was my last Hebrew film, but it was a good one, had a nice time. The developments, how the plots were extended is not going to satisfy all who watches the film. Because some viewers might expect a totally fun, with or without logic. But some look for the value it teaches, morale, message et cetera. Frankly, this film was none of those. But it was also all of those with less highlighting them. Better than the average, and below the awesomeness, surely a worthy film that some people would find it good. 7/10

  • May 16, 2017

    4 Stars. A very moving portrait of a grieving Israeli family a day after their sons Shiva. It's humor is a little too slapstick for me at times but it's welcomed for the most part. I wish there was a little more reflection but the film was about the grieving process and the husband does state how cheap it is to sit and reflect on memories of the past. The film definitely follows suit. The moments the film does reflect though are wondrous and incredibly touching and intimate.

    4 Stars. A very moving portrait of a grieving Israeli family a day after their sons Shiva. It's humor is a little too slapstick for me at times but it's welcomed for the most part. I wish there was a little more reflection but the film was about the grieving process and the husband does state how cheap it is to sit and reflect on memories of the past. The film definitely follows suit. The moments the film does reflect though are wondrous and incredibly touching and intimate.

  • May 14, 2017

    We enjoyed this film very much. We laughed and cried then ate falafel

    We enjoyed this film very much. We laughed and cried then ate falafel

  • Jan 29, 2017

    At some points this film begins to feel like the Israeli equivalent of Curb Your Enthusiasm. However, there is a depth to the film that is apparent, if not through the characters, then through the storytelling.

    At some points this film begins to feel like the Israeli equivalent of Curb Your Enthusiasm. However, there is a depth to the film that is apparent, if not through the characters, then through the storytelling.

  • Oct 17, 2016

    A noble attempt at capturing the feelings associated with grief (and the denial of it) as seen through the eyes of a pair of Israeli parents who lose their son entirely too soon. With moods alternating from the ridiculous to the sublime, the film captures the range of emotions exhibited by grief-stricken souls struggling to deal with loss. Unfortunately, many of those moods are depicted through sequences whose actions go on entirely too long and, consequently, lose their effectiveness in the process. Some judicious editing and better transitions would have improved this ambitious, well-intentioned effort markedly.

    A noble attempt at capturing the feelings associated with grief (and the denial of it) as seen through the eyes of a pair of Israeli parents who lose their son entirely too soon. With moods alternating from the ridiculous to the sublime, the film captures the range of emotions exhibited by grief-stricken souls struggling to deal with loss. Unfortunately, many of those moods are depicted through sequences whose actions go on entirely too long and, consequently, lose their effectiveness in the process. Some judicious editing and better transitions would have improved this ambitious, well-intentioned effort markedly.