Out West Reviews

  • Aug 08, 2020

    Leaving NYC behind for the first time in their partnership, Arbuckle and Keaton turn a satirical eye to the wild west. Out here, amongst the dusty plains and ramshackle abodes, Fatty plays a penniless, train-hopping drifter who's chased into Buster's rowdy cowboy saloon. Taking a job as the barkeep (after a timely disposal of the bullet-riddled previous employee), Arbuckle quickly acclimates to the environment and encourages further chaos in an already out-of-control situation. Keaton doesn't seem to mind, so long as the bodies don't stack so high as to impede his liquor sales. The change in scenery serves this duo well, inspiring a rush of fresh ideas and cinematic creativity. They're experimenting again, with a greater tendency to explore new locations. Where, in the past, they'd typically pick a room and sit in it, Out West sees them stealing lunch aboard a moving locomotive, exchanging fire with dim-witted outlaws on the street, raiding a kidnapper's home in search of a fair damsel and pouring alcohol into an over-served horse at the bar. Clearly, the horizon is expanding for this pair; they're testing their limits, beginning to appreciate the nuances and advantages of working on-screen, rather than on-stage. Maybe not their best collaboration so far, but it constantly hints at greater things to come.

    Leaving NYC behind for the first time in their partnership, Arbuckle and Keaton turn a satirical eye to the wild west. Out here, amongst the dusty plains and ramshackle abodes, Fatty plays a penniless, train-hopping drifter who's chased into Buster's rowdy cowboy saloon. Taking a job as the barkeep (after a timely disposal of the bullet-riddled previous employee), Arbuckle quickly acclimates to the environment and encourages further chaos in an already out-of-control situation. Keaton doesn't seem to mind, so long as the bodies don't stack so high as to impede his liquor sales. The change in scenery serves this duo well, inspiring a rush of fresh ideas and cinematic creativity. They're experimenting again, with a greater tendency to explore new locations. Where, in the past, they'd typically pick a room and sit in it, Out West sees them stealing lunch aboard a moving locomotive, exchanging fire with dim-witted outlaws on the street, raiding a kidnapper's home in search of a fair damsel and pouring alcohol into an over-served horse at the bar. Clearly, the horizon is expanding for this pair; they're testing their limits, beginning to appreciate the nuances and advantages of working on-screen, rather than on-stage. Maybe not their best collaboration so far, but it constantly hints at greater things to come.

  • Feb 17, 2012

    85% Very funny, very enjoyable slapstick silent short.

    85% Very funny, very enjoyable slapstick silent short.

  • Aj V Super Reviewer
    Nov 09, 2011

    This is an entertaining, witty, fun slapstick comedy short, and I enjoyed it. There are a lot of good jokes, but then there are some that are repeated too much so they're not as funny. Overall it's mostly funny, and a pretty good short film.

    This is an entertaining, witty, fun slapstick comedy short, and I enjoyed it. There are a lot of good jokes, but then there are some that are repeated too much so they're not as funny. Overall it's mostly funny, and a pretty good short film.

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    Dillon L Super Reviewer
    Jun 25, 2011

    I gotta say, there's some pretty funny old time slapstick here. Having Buster Keaton in a role is always good too. Arbuckle could've easily made this into feature length if he wanted to. On the other hand, there's some pretty racist stuff in here as well...

    I gotta say, there's some pretty funny old time slapstick here. Having Buster Keaton in a role is always good too. Arbuckle could've easily made this into feature length if he wanted to. On the other hand, there's some pretty racist stuff in here as well...

  • Nov 02, 2009

    It's not a comedy, just a bad parody on farwest movies. Buster Keaton deserved a better plot.

    It's not a comedy, just a bad parody on farwest movies. Buster Keaton deserved a better plot.