Phase 7 Reviews

  • Jul 02, 2014

    He seems nice but too weird to handle men's business. An outbreak of some sort occurs and an apartment complex is quarantined. The individuals within the complex are all fairly segregated and not particularly friendly. All the families/groups in the complex have different needs, and some families are more reluctant to share than others. What transpire are several battles and one family struggles to survive. "Don't be ridiculous, we don't have to tell them anything." Nicolas Goldbart, director of episodes of Jorge, delivers Phase 7 in his major motion picture debut. The storyline for this picture is interesting and fun to watch unfold but not particularly unique. The action scenes are good and some are done with surprisingly good delivery. The acting is nothing special and the cast includes Daniel Hendler, Jazmin Stuart, Frederico Luppi, and Yayo Guridi. "Come here, astronaut." Phase 7 is a movie I came across on Netflix while scrolling through their horror movies. The premise sounded interesting and I was hoping it would be as good as Right at Your Door, but I would say this was a step below that picture. This is worth seeing if you're a fan of Rec or Right at your Door (quarantine movies), but it is far from a classic or must see. "Please, you are a pussy. You are a city creature, that's all." Grade: C+

    He seems nice but too weird to handle men's business. An outbreak of some sort occurs and an apartment complex is quarantined. The individuals within the complex are all fairly segregated and not particularly friendly. All the families/groups in the complex have different needs, and some families are more reluctant to share than others. What transpire are several battles and one family struggles to survive. "Don't be ridiculous, we don't have to tell them anything." Nicolas Goldbart, director of episodes of Jorge, delivers Phase 7 in his major motion picture debut. The storyline for this picture is interesting and fun to watch unfold but not particularly unique. The action scenes are good and some are done with surprisingly good delivery. The acting is nothing special and the cast includes Daniel Hendler, Jazmin Stuart, Frederico Luppi, and Yayo Guridi. "Come here, astronaut." Phase 7 is a movie I came across on Netflix while scrolling through their horror movies. The premise sounded interesting and I was hoping it would be as good as Right at Your Door, but I would say this was a step below that picture. This is worth seeing if you're a fan of Rec or Right at your Door (quarantine movies), but it is far from a classic or must see. "Please, you are a pussy. You are a city creature, that's all." Grade: C+

  • May 27, 2014

    Meh. Decent premise, some interesting characters and decent execution. But the story plods along and takes too narrow of a scope.

    Meh. Decent premise, some interesting characters and decent execution. But the story plods along and takes too narrow of a scope.

  • Dec 26, 2013

    One line summary: Tenants quarantined in an apartment building face scarcity and each other. ------------------------------------------- Coco and Pipi are at the supermarket. She's very pregnant, he's grumpy at best. People are running like anything away from the supermarket as they check out. They arrive home, after seeing others rushing, some with as many groceries as they can tote. There is some plague in Argentina, Mexico, USA, Canada, UK, Spain, and other countries. Air flights are cancelled; some chain stores are closed. One couple in their apartment building was detained by the health authorities for testing. Armed people in hazmat suits inform them that their building is quarantined. A quick total indicates there are 16 people in the building, plus a live in maid. They are closed off with plastic at first. Coco's cough causes some concern. Coco inventories the refrigerator and the rest of the kitchen for rationing purposes. The health folks drop by to give a physical checkup of everyone. Zanutto visits them to borrow a power adapter. They read a lot and play board games. At the beginning, at least, the water and power stay on. The level of the outbreak rises. There is not enough street traffic and police to keep the streets safe at night. A couple of the other tenants have lowered themselves to holding up other tenants using a hammer. On the other hand, Horacio gives them light bulbs, some extra breathing protection, and a pistol, which Coco hides rather than tell Pipi. The alert level rises again, to 7, whatever that means. Horacio meets Coco to give him direct instructions about using the hazmat suit. They meet with Lange, Guglierini, and one other to discuss Zanutto. It turns out the three bachelors are running out of food. So, we have an exercise in the politics of scarcity. Horacio is a survivalist, and a mason, of sorts. He has no intentions of putting up with the bachelors' thieving ways, and he gives Coco some instruction on how to booby trap his apartment to repel intruders. Will the thieves get what they want? Well, no. Zanutto has quite a surprise waiting for them. How does it all pan out? Will the plague be ended? Will some of the tenants survive? ------Scores------- Cinematography: 8/10 There was the occasional soft focus plus large scale darkness. Sound: 10/10 No problems. Acting: 8/10 Daniel Hendler, Jazmin Stuart, Yayo Guridiand, Federico Luppi were all quite good. Screenplay: w/10 Fails as a comedy: no belly laughs, no chuckles, no "isn't that the truth?" moments. As SciFi, it was a wash, since there were no SciFi elements. As a gorefest, it was a bit weak. As drama, it was reasonably strong. The shock of people acting differently under different rules is pretty strong, as is the sight of blasted bodies to those who have never seen them. Much of this movie was about ordinary people dealing with these challenges.

    One line summary: Tenants quarantined in an apartment building face scarcity and each other. ------------------------------------------- Coco and Pipi are at the supermarket. She's very pregnant, he's grumpy at best. People are running like anything away from the supermarket as they check out. They arrive home, after seeing others rushing, some with as many groceries as they can tote. There is some plague in Argentina, Mexico, USA, Canada, UK, Spain, and other countries. Air flights are cancelled; some chain stores are closed. One couple in their apartment building was detained by the health authorities for testing. Armed people in hazmat suits inform them that their building is quarantined. A quick total indicates there are 16 people in the building, plus a live in maid. They are closed off with plastic at first. Coco's cough causes some concern. Coco inventories the refrigerator and the rest of the kitchen for rationing purposes. The health folks drop by to give a physical checkup of everyone. Zanutto visits them to borrow a power adapter. They read a lot and play board games. At the beginning, at least, the water and power stay on. The level of the outbreak rises. There is not enough street traffic and police to keep the streets safe at night. A couple of the other tenants have lowered themselves to holding up other tenants using a hammer. On the other hand, Horacio gives them light bulbs, some extra breathing protection, and a pistol, which Coco hides rather than tell Pipi. The alert level rises again, to 7, whatever that means. Horacio meets Coco to give him direct instructions about using the hazmat suit. They meet with Lange, Guglierini, and one other to discuss Zanutto. It turns out the three bachelors are running out of food. So, we have an exercise in the politics of scarcity. Horacio is a survivalist, and a mason, of sorts. He has no intentions of putting up with the bachelors' thieving ways, and he gives Coco some instruction on how to booby trap his apartment to repel intruders. Will the thieves get what they want? Well, no. Zanutto has quite a surprise waiting for them. How does it all pan out? Will the plague be ended? Will some of the tenants survive? ------Scores------- Cinematography: 8/10 There was the occasional soft focus plus large scale darkness. Sound: 10/10 No problems. Acting: 8/10 Daniel Hendler, Jazmin Stuart, Yayo Guridiand, Federico Luppi were all quite good. Screenplay: w/10 Fails as a comedy: no belly laughs, no chuckles, no "isn't that the truth?" moments. As SciFi, it was a wash, since there were no SciFi elements. As a gorefest, it was a bit weak. As drama, it was reasonably strong. The shock of people acting differently under different rules is pretty strong, as is the sight of blasted bodies to those who have never seen them. Much of this movie was about ordinary people dealing with these challenges.

  • William H Super Reviewer
    Sep 15, 2013

    Crazy Argentines meet REC with John Carpenter style soundtrack. A strange blend of a dark comedy mixed with horror, a pandemic thriller and slapstick.

    Crazy Argentines meet REC with John Carpenter style soundtrack. A strange blend of a dark comedy mixed with horror, a pandemic thriller and slapstick.

  • Aug 25, 2013

    "Phase 7" es una cinta argentina de bajo presupuesto reminiscente de la obra de Nacho Vigalondo ("Cronocrímenes", "Extraterrestre") que nos adentra a las vidas de personas que viven en un edificio en cuarentena. Aparentemente se ha desatado una terrible pandemia. La película sigue a una pareja que abastece su departamento de provisiones pero que se encuentra atrapada entre un grupo de vecinos paranoicos y peligrosos. "Phase 7" no es una propuesta particularmente original pero es entretenida, acompañada de momentos violentos.

    "Phase 7" es una cinta argentina de bajo presupuesto reminiscente de la obra de Nacho Vigalondo ("Cronocrímenes", "Extraterrestre") que nos adentra a las vidas de personas que viven en un edificio en cuarentena. Aparentemente se ha desatado una terrible pandemia. La película sigue a una pareja que abastece su departamento de provisiones pero que se encuentra atrapada entre un grupo de vecinos paranoicos y peligrosos. "Phase 7" no es una propuesta particularmente original pero es entretenida, acompañada de momentos violentos.

  • Pamela D Super Reviewer
    Aug 07, 2013

    <B><I>PHASE 7</B></I> (2011) Argentina; Spanish language, English subtitles WRITTEN AND DIRECTED BY: Nicolás Goldbart FEATURING: Daniel Hendler, Jazmín Stuart, Yayo Guridi, Federico Luppi GENRE: <B>NON-SUPERNATURAL HORROR, THRILLER</B> TAGS: quarantine, pandemic, sci-fi RATING: <B>7 PINTS OF BLOOD</B> PLOT:<B> When a likable young urban couple is quarantined inside their apartment building during a pandemic, they must cope with diminishing supplies and misinformation from the authorities. All the while, their eclectic and quirky neighbors are becoming increasingly unstable and unpredictable.</B> NOTE: This is the second of two reviews of recent, well-produced horror films from Argentina. See also, Penumbra, below. COMMENTS: Coco (Daniel Hendler) and Pipi (Jazmin Stuart) are a naive, happy couple who do normal kinds of things, like go to the grocery on Saturday morning. This Saturday morning is different however. On their way back, people begin swarming the streets in a panic. An epidemic has broken out and if the media is to believed, it's becoming worse by the minute. Monitoring the situation from home, Coco and Pipi's evening is interrupted by floodlights and loudspeakers. Their building's been quarantined and the emergency respondents are cordoning it off under a huge plastic tent, as if the tenants are termites to be exterminated. They find themselves sealed into their own apartment complex, forbidden to leave. They can only watch from their windows as the outside world turns to bedlam around them. Bedlam is not confined to the outside for long. Inside, resources dwindle, utilities are cut off, and fellow residents get cabin fever and panic. Coco does his best to keep his head, protect Pipi, and hold down the fort. It's not easy. It turns out that doomsday scenarios aren't necessarily like fast-paced action movies. Caught in the doldrums, Coco and Pipi are stuck waiting, waiting, waiting... Instead of excitement and contingency, the experience for the group of tenants is more about nagging spouses, running out of lightbulbs and toiletries, and putting up with annoying neighbors, i.e. each other -for awhile that is. As the situation outside increases in severity, tension mounts. Pipi unwittingly works against Coco by innocently leaking critical personal information about their situation to an untrustworthy neighbor. Tenants fraction into factions. Coco must decide whether to go along with the prevailing group or stay out of it. The situation inside the complex degenerates further when under the auspices of moving a possibly infected neighbor off their floor, it becomes clear that the do-good members of the "apartment association" cell are out for their own gain. One thing leads to another and they attempt to force their way in on a fellow resident to loot his provisions. The bodies begin to pile up. Residents are dying, but is it from a hemorrhagic plague, or are they being murdered? Sadly, Coco's best option seems to be to join forces with his paranoid but gregarious, survivalist upstairs friend Horacio (Yayo Guridi). He's a nice guy, but maybe insane. Horacio's apartment turns out to be a high-tech, reinforced bunker complete with an armory of automatic weapons, electronic surveillance equipment, maps, and stacks of classified government information. Horacio wants Coco to join forces with him, and offers him a CBR protective suit and a firearm. Then he invites Coco on patrol with him through the darkened stairwells and corridors of their massive apartment building. The neighbors are up to some monkey business of their own and these nightly sojourns through the edifice's labyrinthine passages turn out to be enlightening in an upsetting and disturbing kind of way. Maybe Horacio isn't so paranoid after all. He seems to know an awful lot about what's going on, more than anyone else. But can Coco trust him? Blackly comic but subtly so, Phase 7 combines suspense, grim social commentary, and unsettling insight into human nature in a droll thriller format which is interrupted by moments of horror. Artfully shot and well paced, Phase 7 makes dramatically good use of camera angles and framing. Lighting is alternately glaring and sterile, and gloomily claustrophobic. This emphasizes the film's thematic contrast; the delineation between the bright, logical, outside world of society, authority and officialdom, versus the insular, isolated, inner world of sanctuary and retreat. Yet as the film goes on, we begin to detect a double meaning; authority is questionable. Society is reasonable strictly on its surface, and only so long as everything is going well. Safe refuge, once cut off from the outside world, can quickly degenerate into a den of suspicion, irrational fear, and schizophrenia. It's the cinematography that accomplishes this. Our sickening epiphany arrives not just from Phase 7's dialogue and action, but from a dual interpretation made possible by the very lighting and camera work itself. Ultimately, Phase 7 is about masquerade; how things -people and situations -can turn out to be something very different from their daily representations. In Phase 7, Coco discovers that he can't trust anyone or anything other than his own judgment and instincts, but the trouble comes from not knowing for sure whether his personal interpretations are sound. Under the circumstances, with little reliable input to go on, and multiple variables and potential explanations for what's happening, every course of action is a gamble. Coco must do his best to make the right choices to deliver himself and Pipi from myriad dangers which mount behind every turn.

    <B><I>PHASE 7</B></I> (2011) Argentina; Spanish language, English subtitles WRITTEN AND DIRECTED BY: Nicolás Goldbart FEATURING: Daniel Hendler, Jazmín Stuart, Yayo Guridi, Federico Luppi GENRE: <B>NON-SUPERNATURAL HORROR, THRILLER</B> TAGS: quarantine, pandemic, sci-fi RATING: <B>7 PINTS OF BLOOD</B> PLOT:<B> When a likable young urban couple is quarantined inside their apartment building during a pandemic, they must cope with diminishing supplies and misinformation from the authorities. All the while, their eclectic and quirky neighbors are becoming increasingly unstable and unpredictable.</B> NOTE: This is the second of two reviews of recent, well-produced horror films from Argentina. See also, Penumbra, below. COMMENTS: Coco (Daniel Hendler) and Pipi (Jazmin Stuart) are a naive, happy couple who do normal kinds of things, like go to the grocery on Saturday morning. This Saturday morning is different however. On their way back, people begin swarming the streets in a panic. An epidemic has broken out and if the media is to believed, it's becoming worse by the minute. Monitoring the situation from home, Coco and Pipi's evening is interrupted by floodlights and loudspeakers. Their building's been quarantined and the emergency respondents are cordoning it off under a huge plastic tent, as if the tenants are termites to be exterminated. They find themselves sealed into their own apartment complex, forbidden to leave. They can only watch from their windows as the outside world turns to bedlam around them. Bedlam is not confined to the outside for long. Inside, resources dwindle, utilities are cut off, and fellow residents get cabin fever and panic. Coco does his best to keep his head, protect Pipi, and hold down the fort. It's not easy. It turns out that doomsday scenarios aren't necessarily like fast-paced action movies. Caught in the doldrums, Coco and Pipi are stuck waiting, waiting, waiting... Instead of excitement and contingency, the experience for the group of tenants is more about nagging spouses, running out of lightbulbs and toiletries, and putting up with annoying neighbors, i.e. each other -for awhile that is. As the situation outside increases in severity, tension mounts. Pipi unwittingly works against Coco by innocently leaking critical personal information about their situation to an untrustworthy neighbor. Tenants fraction into factions. Coco must decide whether to go along with the prevailing group or stay out of it. The situation inside the complex degenerates further when under the auspices of moving a possibly infected neighbor off their floor, it becomes clear that the do-good members of the "apartment association" cell are out for their own gain. One thing leads to another and they attempt to force their way in on a fellow resident to loot his provisions. The bodies begin to pile up. Residents are dying, but is it from a hemorrhagic plague, or are they being murdered? Sadly, Coco's best option seems to be to join forces with his paranoid but gregarious, survivalist upstairs friend Horacio (Yayo Guridi). He's a nice guy, but maybe insane. Horacio's apartment turns out to be a high-tech, reinforced bunker complete with an armory of automatic weapons, electronic surveillance equipment, maps, and stacks of classified government information. Horacio wants Coco to join forces with him, and offers him a CBR protective suit and a firearm. Then he invites Coco on patrol with him through the darkened stairwells and corridors of their massive apartment building. The neighbors are up to some monkey business of their own and these nightly sojourns through the edifice's labyrinthine passages turn out to be enlightening in an upsetting and disturbing kind of way. Maybe Horacio isn't so paranoid after all. He seems to know an awful lot about what's going on, more than anyone else. But can Coco trust him? Blackly comic but subtly so, Phase 7 combines suspense, grim social commentary, and unsettling insight into human nature in a droll thriller format which is interrupted by moments of horror. Artfully shot and well paced, Phase 7 makes dramatically good use of camera angles and framing. Lighting is alternately glaring and sterile, and gloomily claustrophobic. This emphasizes the film's thematic contrast; the delineation between the bright, logical, outside world of society, authority and officialdom, versus the insular, isolated, inner world of sanctuary and retreat. Yet as the film goes on, we begin to detect a double meaning; authority is questionable. Society is reasonable strictly on its surface, and only so long as everything is going well. Safe refuge, once cut off from the outside world, can quickly degenerate into a den of suspicion, irrational fear, and schizophrenia. It's the cinematography that accomplishes this. Our sickening epiphany arrives not just from Phase 7's dialogue and action, but from a dual interpretation made possible by the very lighting and camera work itself. Ultimately, Phase 7 is about masquerade; how things -people and situations -can turn out to be something very different from their daily representations. In Phase 7, Coco discovers that he can't trust anyone or anything other than his own judgment and instincts, but the trouble comes from not knowing for sure whether his personal interpretations are sound. Under the circumstances, with little reliable input to go on, and multiple variables and potential explanations for what's happening, every course of action is a gamble. Coco must do his best to make the right choices to deliver himself and Pipi from myriad dangers which mount behind every turn.

  • Aug 06, 2013

    <B><I>PHASE 7</B></I> (2011) Argentina; Spanish language, English subtitles WRITTEN AND DIRECTED BY: Nicolás Goldbart FEATURING: Daniel Hendler, Jazmín Stuart, Yayo Guridi, Federico Luppi GENRE: <B>NON-SUPERNATURAL HORROR, THRILLER</B> TAGS: quarantine, pandemic, sci-fi RATING: <B>7 PINTS OF BLOOD</B> PLOT:<B> When a likable young urban couple is quarantined inside their apartment building during a pandemic, they must cope with diminishing supplies and misinformation from the authorities. All the while, their eclectic and quirky neighbors are becoming increasingly unstable and unpredictable.</B> NOTE: This is the second of two reviews of recent, well-produced horror films from Argentina. See also, Penumbra, below. COMMENTS: Coco (Daniel Hendler) and Pipi (Jazmin Stuart) are a naive, happy couple who do normal kinds of things, like go to the grocery on Saturday morning. This Saturday morning is different however. On their way back, people begin swarming the streets in a panic. An epidemic has broken out and if the media is to believed, it's becoming worse by the minute. Monitoring the situation from home, Coco and Pipi's evening is interrupted by floodlights and loudspeakers. Their building's been quarantined and the emergency respondents are cordoning it off under a huge plastic tent, as if the tenants are termites to be exterminated. They find themselves sealed into their own apartment complex, forbidden to leave. They can only watch from their windows as the outside world turns to bedlam around them. Bedlam is not confined to the outside for long. Inside, resources dwindle, utilities are cut off, and fellow residents get cabin fever and panic. Coco does his best to keep his head, protect Pipi, and hold down the fort. It's not easy. It turns out that doomsday scenarios aren't necessarily like fast-paced action movies. Caught in the doldrums, Coco and Pipi are stuck waiting, waiting, waiting... Instead of excitement and contingency, the experience for the group of tenants is more about nagging spouses, running out of lightbulbs and toiletries, and putting up with annoying neighbors, i.e. each other -for awhile that is. As the situation outside increases in severity, tension mounts. Pipi unwittingly works against Coco by innocently leaking critical personal information about their situation to an untrustworthy neighbor. Tenants fraction into factions. Coco must decide whether to go along with the prevailing group or stay out of it. The situation inside the complex degenerates further when under the auspices of moving a possibly infected neighbor off their floor, it becomes clear that the do-good members of the "apartment association" cell are out for their own gain. One thing leads to another and they attempt to force their way in on a fellow resident to loot his provisions. The bodies begin to pile up. Residents are dying, but is it from a hemorrhagic plague, or are they being murdered? Sadly, Coco's best option seems to be to join forces with his paranoid but gregarious, survivalist upstairs friend Horacio (Yayo Guridi). He's a nice guy, but maybe insane. Horacio's apartment turns out to be a high-tech, reinforced bunker complete with an armory of automatic weapons, electronic surveillance equipment, maps, and stacks of classified government information. Horacio wants Coco to join forces with him, and offers him a CBR protective suit and a firearm. Then he invites Coco on patrol with him through the darkened stairwells and corridors of their massive apartment building. The neighbors are up to some monkey business of their own and these nightly sojourns through the edifice's labyrinthine passages turn out to be enlightening in an upsetting and disturbing kind of way. Maybe Horacio isn't so paranoid after all. He seems to know an awful lot about what's going on, more than anyone else. But can Coco trust him? Blackly comic but subtly so, Phase 7 combines suspense, grim social commentary, and unsettling insight into human nature in a thriller format which is interrupted by moments of horror. Artfully shot and well paced, Phase 7 makes dramatically good use of camera angles and framing. Lighting is alternately glaring and sterile, and gloomily claustrophobic. This emphasizes the film's thematic contrast; the delineation between the bright, logical, outside world of society, authority and officialdom, versus the insular, isolated, inner world of sanctuary and retreat. Yet as the film goes on, we begin to detect a double meaning; authority is questionable. Society is reasonable strictly on its surface, and only so long as everything is going well. Safe refuge, once cut off from the outside world, can quickly degenerate into an insular den of suspicion, irrational fear, and schizophrenia. It's the cinematography that accomplishes this. Our sickening epiphany arrives not just from Phase 7's dialogue and action, but from a dual interpretation made possible by the very lighting and camera work itself. Ultimately, Phase 7 is about masquerade; how things -people and situations -can turn out to be something very different from their daily representations. In Phase 7, Coco discovers that he can't trust anyone or anything other than his own judgment and instincts, but the trouble comes from not knowing for sure whether his personal interpretations are sound. Under the circumstances, with little reliable input to go on, and multiple variables and potential explanations for what's happening, every course of action is a gamble. Coco must do his best to make the right choices to deliver himself and Pipi from myriad dangers which mount behind every turn of their complex's twisting stairwells, foreboding cavernous parking garage, and eerily dimmed corridors.

    <B><I>PHASE 7</B></I> (2011) Argentina; Spanish language, English subtitles WRITTEN AND DIRECTED BY: Nicolás Goldbart FEATURING: Daniel Hendler, Jazmín Stuart, Yayo Guridi, Federico Luppi GENRE: <B>NON-SUPERNATURAL HORROR, THRILLER</B> TAGS: quarantine, pandemic, sci-fi RATING: <B>7 PINTS OF BLOOD</B> PLOT:<B> When a likable young urban couple is quarantined inside their apartment building during a pandemic, they must cope with diminishing supplies and misinformation from the authorities. All the while, their eclectic and quirky neighbors are becoming increasingly unstable and unpredictable.</B> NOTE: This is the second of two reviews of recent, well-produced horror films from Argentina. See also, Penumbra, below. COMMENTS: Coco (Daniel Hendler) and Pipi (Jazmin Stuart) are a naive, happy couple who do normal kinds of things, like go to the grocery on Saturday morning. This Saturday morning is different however. On their way back, people begin swarming the streets in a panic. An epidemic has broken out and if the media is to believed, it's becoming worse by the minute. Monitoring the situation from home, Coco and Pipi's evening is interrupted by floodlights and loudspeakers. Their building's been quarantined and the emergency respondents are cordoning it off under a huge plastic tent, as if the tenants are termites to be exterminated. They find themselves sealed into their own apartment complex, forbidden to leave. They can only watch from their windows as the outside world turns to bedlam around them. Bedlam is not confined to the outside for long. Inside, resources dwindle, utilities are cut off, and fellow residents get cabin fever and panic. Coco does his best to keep his head, protect Pipi, and hold down the fort. It's not easy. It turns out that doomsday scenarios aren't necessarily like fast-paced action movies. Caught in the doldrums, Coco and Pipi are stuck waiting, waiting, waiting... Instead of excitement and contingency, the experience for the group of tenants is more about nagging spouses, running out of lightbulbs and toiletries, and putting up with annoying neighbors, i.e. each other -for awhile that is. As the situation outside increases in severity, tension mounts. Pipi unwittingly works against Coco by innocently leaking critical personal information about their situation to an untrustworthy neighbor. Tenants fraction into factions. Coco must decide whether to go along with the prevailing group or stay out of it. The situation inside the complex degenerates further when under the auspices of moving a possibly infected neighbor off their floor, it becomes clear that the do-good members of the "apartment association" cell are out for their own gain. One thing leads to another and they attempt to force their way in on a fellow resident to loot his provisions. The bodies begin to pile up. Residents are dying, but is it from a hemorrhagic plague, or are they being murdered? Sadly, Coco's best option seems to be to join forces with his paranoid but gregarious, survivalist upstairs friend Horacio (Yayo Guridi). He's a nice guy, but maybe insane. Horacio's apartment turns out to be a high-tech, reinforced bunker complete with an armory of automatic weapons, electronic surveillance equipment, maps, and stacks of classified government information. Horacio wants Coco to join forces with him, and offers him a CBR protective suit and a firearm. Then he invites Coco on patrol with him through the darkened stairwells and corridors of their massive apartment building. The neighbors are up to some monkey business of their own and these nightly sojourns through the edifice's labyrinthine passages turn out to be enlightening in an upsetting and disturbing kind of way. Maybe Horacio isn't so paranoid after all. He seems to know an awful lot about what's going on, more than anyone else. But can Coco trust him? Blackly comic but subtly so, Phase 7 combines suspense, grim social commentary, and unsettling insight into human nature in a thriller format which is interrupted by moments of horror. Artfully shot and well paced, Phase 7 makes dramatically good use of camera angles and framing. Lighting is alternately glaring and sterile, and gloomily claustrophobic. This emphasizes the film's thematic contrast; the delineation between the bright, logical, outside world of society, authority and officialdom, versus the insular, isolated, inner world of sanctuary and retreat. Yet as the film goes on, we begin to detect a double meaning; authority is questionable. Society is reasonable strictly on its surface, and only so long as everything is going well. Safe refuge, once cut off from the outside world, can quickly degenerate into an insular den of suspicion, irrational fear, and schizophrenia. It's the cinematography that accomplishes this. Our sickening epiphany arrives not just from Phase 7's dialogue and action, but from a dual interpretation made possible by the very lighting and camera work itself. Ultimately, Phase 7 is about masquerade; how things -people and situations -can turn out to be something very different from their daily representations. In Phase 7, Coco discovers that he can't trust anyone or anything other than his own judgment and instincts, but the trouble comes from not knowing for sure whether his personal interpretations are sound. Under the circumstances, with little reliable input to go on, and multiple variables and potential explanations for what's happening, every course of action is a gamble. Coco must do his best to make the right choices to deliver himself and Pipi from myriad dangers which mount behind every turn of their complex's twisting stairwells, foreboding cavernous parking garage, and eerily dimmed corridors.

  • Jesse O Super Reviewer
    Jul 28, 2013

    This a surprising little movie here, it is far more sci-fi than it is a horror movie. Of course, at first I thought this would be simply a REC ripoff. The concept is exactly the same, a quarantined apartment complex that is, likely, being ravaged by a deadly virus. The difference is, this virus doesn't turn people into zombies, it simply just kills them. The difference is in the execution of the story, as this movie focuses on a more contained struggle between the tenants and their growing mistrust of each other. I also liked the fact that the movie was far funnier than I was expecting, with Horacio delivering some hilarious insults. The problem is that the movie really starts to drag more than halfway through the flick. The biggest offender would be the scene where Coco and Horacio are going after Zanutto, this scene simply goes on too long. Though it does leads to a really cool shootout sequence, after it the movie just sort comes to a halt and it doesn't ever really come back from it. I thought the score to the film was really cool as well, as it has an old-school feel with a modern twist. I thought the film was pretty good for the most part, as mentioned the movie drags so much that it downgrades the rating for me. It has some clever moments, but it is largely an average movie overall. Wouldn't give it a glowing recommendation, but you could do much worse.

    This a surprising little movie here, it is far more sci-fi than it is a horror movie. Of course, at first I thought this would be simply a REC ripoff. The concept is exactly the same, a quarantined apartment complex that is, likely, being ravaged by a deadly virus. The difference is, this virus doesn't turn people into zombies, it simply just kills them. The difference is in the execution of the story, as this movie focuses on a more contained struggle between the tenants and their growing mistrust of each other. I also liked the fact that the movie was far funnier than I was expecting, with Horacio delivering some hilarious insults. The problem is that the movie really starts to drag more than halfway through the flick. The biggest offender would be the scene where Coco and Horacio are going after Zanutto, this scene simply goes on too long. Though it does leads to a really cool shootout sequence, after it the movie just sort comes to a halt and it doesn't ever really come back from it. I thought the score to the film was really cool as well, as it has an old-school feel with a modern twist. I thought the film was pretty good for the most part, as mentioned the movie drags so much that it downgrades the rating for me. It has some clever moments, but it is largely an average movie overall. Wouldn't give it a glowing recommendation, but you could do much worse.

  • Jul 13, 2013

    This movie was decent. had some witty moments. I loved the character of Horatio but spent most of it hating the main character and his wife. spent most of the film wanting them to die.

    This movie was decent. had some witty moments. I loved the character of Horatio but spent most of it hating the main character and his wife. spent most of the film wanting them to die.

  • Jul 06, 2013

    This film is not at all what you would expect it to be.

    This film is not at all what you would expect it to be.