Pick Up The Mic Reviews

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    John B Super Reviewer
    Jun 11, 2013

    A very entertaining view into the queer hip hop that we don't get to see very often.

    A very entertaining view into the queer hip hop that we don't get to see very often.

  • Apr 08, 2011

    f-ing aye... if only there was more of katastrophe rapping!

    f-ing aye... if only there was more of katastrophe rapping!

  • Apr 08, 2011

    informative and interesting, but at times slow, this documentary takes you into the world of queer/gay/homo/ hip hop in the United States. From black to white to hispanic, from San Francisco to Minneapolis to New York City, from gay, bi, and trans. To those who are activists, to those who want to break into the mainstream, to those who look at themselves as hip hop artists who just happen to be gay.

    informative and interesting, but at times slow, this documentary takes you into the world of queer/gay/homo/ hip hop in the United States. From black to white to hispanic, from San Francisco to Minneapolis to New York City, from gay, bi, and trans. To those who are activists, to those who want to break into the mainstream, to those who look at themselves as hip hop artists who just happen to be gay.

  • Apr 08, 2011

    "Gay men doing hip-hop is a revolutionary act." I'm always looking out for documentaries that teach me something I didn't know and I checked this out on Netflix streaming. This film examines the burgeoning "homohop" community, underground hip-hop made by gay, lesbian, bisexual, and trans MCs. I wasn't really familiar with anybody who showed up in the doc (except for Cazwell, who isn't interviewed and is barely there), so it was quite a learning experience. There are pockets of strength in this community, especially in Oakland, San Fran, Chicago, and New York. Rappers profiled are mostly from those areas, but there were a few surprises like Madison and Houston in the mix as well.

    "Gay men doing hip-hop is a revolutionary act." I'm always looking out for documentaries that teach me something I didn't know and I checked this out on Netflix streaming. This film examines the burgeoning "homohop" community, underground hip-hop made by gay, lesbian, bisexual, and trans MCs. I wasn't really familiar with anybody who showed up in the doc (except for Cazwell, who isn't interviewed and is barely there), so it was quite a learning experience. There are pockets of strength in this community, especially in Oakland, San Fran, Chicago, and New York. Rappers profiled are mostly from those areas, but there were a few surprises like Madison and Houston in the mix as well.