Portrait of Jennie Reviews

  • Feb 10, 2019

    Well done Selznick production featuring his wife Jennifer Jones as the titular Jennie. Great scenes shot in NYC that give a fantastic vibe of the 1940's feel for the City. Also, has a very ethereal ambiance of Cotten and Jones meeting through time. Jones does have a certain 'heavenly' presence in the film, but Cotten does not match her performance as the struggling artist. And the whole production comes off as over wrought, over melodramatic and over scored which do not then bolster the spiritual element of time and love the films strives to obtain. Enjoyable, but just doesn't match the craftsmanship of some of Selznick's other production such as "Rebecca".

    Well done Selznick production featuring his wife Jennifer Jones as the titular Jennie. Great scenes shot in NYC that give a fantastic vibe of the 1940's feel for the City. Also, has a very ethereal ambiance of Cotten and Jones meeting through time. Jones does have a certain 'heavenly' presence in the film, but Cotten does not match her performance as the struggling artist. And the whole production comes off as over wrought, over melodramatic and over scored which do not then bolster the spiritual element of time and love the films strives to obtain. Enjoyable, but just doesn't match the craftsmanship of some of Selznick's other production such as "Rebecca".

  • Feb 02, 2019

    The best fantasy romance movie ever made! Winner of the Best Visual Effects Academy Award!

    The best fantasy romance movie ever made! Winner of the Best Visual Effects Academy Award!

  • Oct 07, 2018

    Lovely haunting love story. Wonderful performances by Jennifer Jones and Ethyl Barrymore. Cinematography and music provide a warm and thoughtful finish.

    Lovely haunting love story. Wonderful performances by Jennifer Jones and Ethyl Barrymore. Cinematography and music provide a warm and thoughtful finish.

  • Jan 26, 2018

    Takes an awful lot of suspension of disbelief, but once you buy in, very romantic and beautifully shot and quite a different type of ghost story. Plus a legendary cast to boot.

    Takes an awful lot of suspension of disbelief, but once you buy in, very romantic and beautifully shot and quite a different type of ghost story. Plus a legendary cast to boot.

  • Jan 10, 2018

    A little masterpiece this film is and a big wonder. I was surprised to come upon this movie: cinema has so many gems to offer in the heap of all movies, you just have to dig a little. This picture is spiritually very empowering; another movie about man's obsession with a woman, now it is in a form of true love that transcends time and is indeed eternal. It is so dreamy, foggy, shadowy, almost like a myth; the cinematographer did a very good job, the atmosphere is overwhelmingly likeable. One of the best romantic movies, no doubt.

    A little masterpiece this film is and a big wonder. I was surprised to come upon this movie: cinema has so many gems to offer in the heap of all movies, you just have to dig a little. This picture is spiritually very empowering; another movie about man's obsession with a woman, now it is in a form of true love that transcends time and is indeed eternal. It is so dreamy, foggy, shadowy, almost like a myth; the cinematographer did a very good job, the atmosphere is overwhelmingly likeable. One of the best romantic movies, no doubt.

  • Antonius B Super Reviewer
    Oct 14, 2017

    There is an element of magic to this story, which has a struggling artist (Joseph Cotten) meeting a young girl (Jennifer Jones) in the park by chance one day. It's soon apparent that there is something different about this girl, as she mentions things from decades ago as if they were current, and ages a little each time he subsequently meets her. A romance begins to develop, fueled by artistic inspiration she gives him, as well as mystery - is she a ghost? A muse? Someone only he can see? Meanwhile, tragedy lurks. The film is gorgeous, with beautiful shots of winter in New York City, and artistic effects such as those created by spreading canvas over the camera lens. The performances are reasonably good, and it was fantastic to see Ethel Barrymore and Lillian Gish in supporting roles. There is a dreamy feel to it, as well as philosophical message of the timelessness of art and love. It's intellectual, opening with deep thoughts ("Since time began man has looked into the awesome reaches of infinity and asked the eternal question: What is time? What is life? What is space? What is death?"), quotes from Euripides and Keats, and other profundity ("This was tomorrow once..."). It's also quite romantic ("I know we were meant to be together. The strands of our lives are woven together and neither the world nor time can tear them apart"), and it may be too syrupy or cheesy for some viewers. I have to say that Director William Dieterle does lay it on pretty thick towards the end - but all in all, with aesthetic elements that touch the head and heart, I found it entertaining.

    There is an element of magic to this story, which has a struggling artist (Joseph Cotten) meeting a young girl (Jennifer Jones) in the park by chance one day. It's soon apparent that there is something different about this girl, as she mentions things from decades ago as if they were current, and ages a little each time he subsequently meets her. A romance begins to develop, fueled by artistic inspiration she gives him, as well as mystery - is she a ghost? A muse? Someone only he can see? Meanwhile, tragedy lurks. The film is gorgeous, with beautiful shots of winter in New York City, and artistic effects such as those created by spreading canvas over the camera lens. The performances are reasonably good, and it was fantastic to see Ethel Barrymore and Lillian Gish in supporting roles. There is a dreamy feel to it, as well as philosophical message of the timelessness of art and love. It's intellectual, opening with deep thoughts ("Since time began man has looked into the awesome reaches of infinity and asked the eternal question: What is time? What is life? What is space? What is death?"), quotes from Euripides and Keats, and other profundity ("This was tomorrow once..."). It's also quite romantic ("I know we were meant to be together. The strands of our lives are woven together and neither the world nor time can tear them apart"), and it may be too syrupy or cheesy for some viewers. I have to say that Director William Dieterle does lay it on pretty thick towards the end - but all in all, with aesthetic elements that touch the head and heart, I found it entertaining.

  • Jan 19, 2017

    For the first of 2017 I was so grateful to see this somewhat mesmerizing film about a struggling artist desperate for both work & inspiration in NYC. He coincidently bumps into a school girl called Jennie who he becomes fascinated with that seems to have a past that doesn't entirely connect with present day. As the artist progress to delve into Jennie's past he finds that she is in fact a ghost that meet a terrible end that he mysteriously connects with. An unusual fantasy film that is completely engrossing.

    For the first of 2017 I was so grateful to see this somewhat mesmerizing film about a struggling artist desperate for both work & inspiration in NYC. He coincidently bumps into a school girl called Jennie who he becomes fascinated with that seems to have a past that doesn't entirely connect with present day. As the artist progress to delve into Jennie's past he finds that she is in fact a ghost that meet a terrible end that he mysteriously connects with. An unusual fantasy film that is completely engrossing.

  • Nov 30, 2015

    So good! This movie has everything...artsy existential ponderings, beautiful shots, epic romance, and awesome friendships. Will satisfy your classic movie cravings and hipster seafaring obsession!

    So good! This movie has everything...artsy existential ponderings, beautiful shots, epic romance, and awesome friendships. Will satisfy your classic movie cravings and hipster seafaring obsession!

  • May 30, 2015

    Isn't Hitchcock's "Vertigo" weirdly familiar to it?

    Isn't Hitchcock's "Vertigo" weirdly familiar to it?

  • Jan 11, 2015

    Charming fantasy film about artist Joseph Cotten meeting a sweet young girl in Central Park and then a few days running into the same girl, now years older. Cotten soon realizes that she is from the past and that he is also falling in love with her. David O. Selznick produced this wonderful romantic fantasy film, which stared his soon to be wife, Jennifer Jones. Cotton delivers his usual good performance, but Jones really stands out, convincingly aging throughout the course of the film. Dimitri Tiomkin provides a lush score that sounded more like a Bernard Hermann score. Joseph H. August gave the film a mostly dreamlike quality that immensely helped the film, especially the film's truly magical ending.

    Charming fantasy film about artist Joseph Cotten meeting a sweet young girl in Central Park and then a few days running into the same girl, now years older. Cotten soon realizes that she is from the past and that he is also falling in love with her. David O. Selznick produced this wonderful romantic fantasy film, which stared his soon to be wife, Jennifer Jones. Cotton delivers his usual good performance, but Jones really stands out, convincingly aging throughout the course of the film. Dimitri Tiomkin provides a lush score that sounded more like a Bernard Hermann score. Joseph H. August gave the film a mostly dreamlike quality that immensely helped the film, especially the film's truly magical ending.