Post Mortem Reviews

  • May 03, 2017

    Following in the footsteps of the movie Tony Manero, Pablo Larrain delivers another film that I hated. Once again there is not a single good acting performance, or likable character. I think there’s a plot in Post Mortem, but it plays out slowly and with no emotion so I lost interest in it. It’s even worse because there are exciting things going on around the main character, but he rarely gets involved in them, so we are left to be bored by the uneventful nature of his life. There is literally a political revolution going on in the background of this film, but we only see it affect Mario in a couple of scenes. I kept zoning out and getting distracted while watching this film because it was so tedious and dull. There was a single scene that actually was halfway interesting, but I couldn’t even enjoy that because it was shot so terribly with the camera simply plopped down in a distant corner. The only redeeming quality of this film over Tony Manero is that the main character wasn’t despicable to the point of distraction. I guess it’s better to be bored than to be actively repulsed by a movie, so Post Mortem won’t fall on any worst of all time lists for me, but I still hated watching it.

    Following in the footsteps of the movie Tony Manero, Pablo Larrain delivers another film that I hated. Once again there is not a single good acting performance, or likable character. I think there’s a plot in Post Mortem, but it plays out slowly and with no emotion so I lost interest in it. It’s even worse because there are exciting things going on around the main character, but he rarely gets involved in them, so we are left to be bored by the uneventful nature of his life. There is literally a political revolution going on in the background of this film, but we only see it affect Mario in a couple of scenes. I kept zoning out and getting distracted while watching this film because it was so tedious and dull. There was a single scene that actually was halfway interesting, but I couldn’t even enjoy that because it was shot so terribly with the camera simply plopped down in a distant corner. The only redeeming quality of this film over Tony Manero is that the main character wasn’t despicable to the point of distraction. I guess it’s better to be bored than to be actively repulsed by a movie, so Post Mortem won’t fall on any worst of all time lists for me, but I still hated watching it.

  • Oct 17, 2014

    A rather disturbing movie, slow but with some bizarre and disconcerting twists.

    A rather disturbing movie, slow but with some bizarre and disconcerting twists.

  • Aug 26, 2013

    Pablo Larraín no es un gran director, le ha tomado mucho tiempo y muchos ensayos ir aprendiendo a compatibilizar historias con personajes, producción con fotografía... a pesar de tener recursos garantizados. En fin, la crítica es general, porque en esta película creo que resuelve la historia de una manera completa, los personajes tienen la opacidad justa, sin tanta exageración como por ejemplo en Fuga y Tony Manero, lo que arma en conjunto una buena película.

    Pablo Larraín no es un gran director, le ha tomado mucho tiempo y muchos ensayos ir aprendiendo a compatibilizar historias con personajes, producción con fotografía... a pesar de tener recursos garantizados. En fin, la crítica es general, porque en esta película creo que resuelve la historia de una manera completa, los personajes tienen la opacidad justa, sin tanta exageración como por ejemplo en Fuga y Tony Manero, lo que arma en conjunto una buena película.

  • Jan 18, 2013

    Post Mortem Chilean film directed by Pablo Larraín. Starring Alfredo Castro. The film competed in the 67th Venice International Film Festival in Sept 2010. Mario (Castro) has got feelings for his neighbor Nancy (Zegers) a dancer who loses her job (she's too skinny and not voluptuous her boss insists) at the sleazy nightclub. She is involved with a cell of left-wing activists including her father and her hunky lover, who's everything Mario isn't. One day Mario misses the start of the military coup while he's taking a nap. He emerges onto a vacant street, he realize that something has been taking place. At his hospital, the bodies are compiling up and military personnel are ordering his boss Dr. to perform autopsy on the bodies, while Mario is dictated to type down cause of the death. Film is typical sensational but not without dark-comedy. Moves with pace and subject. Handful of characters, they understand what the director wants from them. Amazingly very well-woven climax.

    Post Mortem Chilean film directed by Pablo Larraín. Starring Alfredo Castro. The film competed in the 67th Venice International Film Festival in Sept 2010. Mario (Castro) has got feelings for his neighbor Nancy (Zegers) a dancer who loses her job (she's too skinny and not voluptuous her boss insists) at the sleazy nightclub. She is involved with a cell of left-wing activists including her father and her hunky lover, who's everything Mario isn't. One day Mario misses the start of the military coup while he's taking a nap. He emerges onto a vacant street, he realize that something has been taking place. At his hospital, the bodies are compiling up and military personnel are ordering his boss Dr. to perform autopsy on the bodies, while Mario is dictated to type down cause of the death. Film is typical sensational but not without dark-comedy. Moves with pace and subject. Handful of characters, they understand what the director wants from them. Amazingly very well-woven climax.

  • Jan 05, 2013

    A rather bleak, downbeat and dreary drama--Politics and psychology!!

    A rather bleak, downbeat and dreary drama--Politics and psychology!!

  • Nov 29, 2012

    Telling an intense story quietly.

    Telling an intense story quietly.

  • Sep 21, 2012

    The aesthetics -- the art -- is riveting..... the acting subdued, but powerful, the subject matter difficult, but I felt as if I was there ... I truly reflected on this historical moment that I was familiar with (during and after the film). Recommended!

    The aesthetics -- the art -- is riveting..... the acting subdued, but powerful, the subject matter difficult, but I felt as if I was there ... I truly reflected on this historical moment that I was familiar with (during and after the film). Recommended!

  • Sep 04, 2012

    click for review

    click for review

  • Jul 21, 2012

    Interesting political backdrop with the coup and takeover from Pinnochet, but other than that...yawn

    Interesting political backdrop with the coup and takeover from Pinnochet, but other than that...yawn

  • Walter M Super Reviewer
    Apr 22, 2012

    Even though I usually don't favor any movie with an ending that piles on, it turns out there is quite a bit to admire in the intriguing "Post Mortem" and what it has to say about perceptions. You wouldn't really notice Mario(Alfredo Castro), a squirrelly middle-aged man who works in the cornorer's office, if you walked past him on the street which allows him to slip through unnoticed backstage at a dance hall to see Nancy(Antonia Zegers), his neighbor, who is literally fading from view. She ordinarily would not give him the time of day but she needs a ride home when she gets fired for losing too much weight, at least until they run into a friend of hers on the way home at a street protest. Of course, being noticed can sometimes be a hundred times worse because this is Santiago, Chile in 1973. Normally I would cheer on any display of leftist political expression on screen(Just one time, I would love to be at a meeting where everybody cheers Ho Chi Minh's name at a meeting). Here, I was just hoping everybody would lay low for their own safety, knowing that repression and murder are just right around the corner, even though it probably would not have saved their lives. These deaths are not the only ones foreshadowed, as Nancy's death is also foretold. For Mario, also, much of the political action happens just out of earshot which is indicated by the excellent sound engineering. Mario is just old fashioned, rejecting the politics and advances of his attractive colleague Sandra(Amparo Noguera) because she sleeps with other men.

    Even though I usually don't favor any movie with an ending that piles on, it turns out there is quite a bit to admire in the intriguing "Post Mortem" and what it has to say about perceptions. You wouldn't really notice Mario(Alfredo Castro), a squirrelly middle-aged man who works in the cornorer's office, if you walked past him on the street which allows him to slip through unnoticed backstage at a dance hall to see Nancy(Antonia Zegers), his neighbor, who is literally fading from view. She ordinarily would not give him the time of day but she needs a ride home when she gets fired for losing too much weight, at least until they run into a friend of hers on the way home at a street protest. Of course, being noticed can sometimes be a hundred times worse because this is Santiago, Chile in 1973. Normally I would cheer on any display of leftist political expression on screen(Just one time, I would love to be at a meeting where everybody cheers Ho Chi Minh's name at a meeting). Here, I was just hoping everybody would lay low for their own safety, knowing that repression and murder are just right around the corner, even though it probably would not have saved their lives. These deaths are not the only ones foreshadowed, as Nancy's death is also foretold. For Mario, also, much of the political action happens just out of earshot which is indicated by the excellent sound engineering. Mario is just old fashioned, rejecting the politics and advances of his attractive colleague Sandra(Amparo Noguera) because she sleeps with other men.