The Private Life of Sherlock Holmes Reviews

  • May 24, 2020

    A great adaptation from a master this might be my favourite Sherlock movie so far and the most underrated Billy Wilder picture a underrated gem.

    A great adaptation from a master this might be my favourite Sherlock movie so far and the most underrated Billy Wilder picture a underrated gem.

  • May 28, 2019

    It hasn't necessarily aged well, it is still though quite entertaining and offers some laughs. Great on screen chemistry between Robert Stephens and Colin Blakely.

    It hasn't necessarily aged well, it is still though quite entertaining and offers some laughs. Great on screen chemistry between Robert Stephens and Colin Blakely.

  • May 12, 2019

    Wonderfully entertaining. I love that it has the humor and intelligence of Hollywood’s Billy Wilder, and the authentic English casting of Stephens and Blakely. (Far better than the irritating and hard to listen to Nicol Williamson and phony ham accent of Duvall in The Seven-per-Cent Solution). Elegant production values and cinematography as well.

    Wonderfully entertaining. I love that it has the humor and intelligence of Hollywood’s Billy Wilder, and the authentic English casting of Stephens and Blakely. (Far better than the irritating and hard to listen to Nicol Williamson and phony ham accent of Duvall in The Seven-per-Cent Solution). Elegant production values and cinematography as well.

  • May 13, 2017

    Amazing. Gives of material completely unique compared to other Sherlock Holmes movies.

    Amazing. Gives of material completely unique compared to other Sherlock Holmes movies.

  • Dec 19, 2016

    Sherlock Holmes (Robert Stephens) gets embroiled in a case that involves a widowed Belgian woman (Genevieve Page), the Loch Ness monster, a bizarre secret society, and the secret agent activity of his brother Mycroft (Christopher Lee). Billy Wilder directed the film while co-writing the screenplay with I.A.L. Diamond, so one is all but guaranteed to find an expertly-paced movie with cheeky dialogue. That being said, a viewer may be surprised to find postmodern touches such as commentary on Sherlock's cocaine use as well as implications of homosexuality. The Private Life of Sherlock Holmes doesn't quite measure up to Wilder classics like The Apartment or Some Like It Hot, but it's still a clever, entertaining movie that's too often overlooked.

    Sherlock Holmes (Robert Stephens) gets embroiled in a case that involves a widowed Belgian woman (Genevieve Page), the Loch Ness monster, a bizarre secret society, and the secret agent activity of his brother Mycroft (Christopher Lee). Billy Wilder directed the film while co-writing the screenplay with I.A.L. Diamond, so one is all but guaranteed to find an expertly-paced movie with cheeky dialogue. That being said, a viewer may be surprised to find postmodern touches such as commentary on Sherlock's cocaine use as well as implications of homosexuality. The Private Life of Sherlock Holmes doesn't quite measure up to Wilder classics like The Apartment or Some Like It Hot, but it's still a clever, entertaining movie that's too often overlooked.

  • Marcus W Super Reviewer
    Jun 01, 2016

    There have been many Sherlock Holmes films, but this is one of the best thanks to Wilder and a flawless lead performance by Stephens.

    There have been many Sherlock Holmes films, but this is one of the best thanks to Wilder and a flawless lead performance by Stephens.

  • Kevin M. W Super Reviewer
    Jan 22, 2016

    A different take on the myth if Sherlock Holmes. In this he is all too human: a drug addict, a homosexual, and not even too swift as a detective. At least the film is accomplished with talent, but it leaves a disquieting feeling of dissatisfaction seeing a heroic figure fail so many ways. The character one is lead to empathize with the most with loses at the end ... most irregular. Watch at your own peril.

    A different take on the myth if Sherlock Holmes. In this he is all too human: a drug addict, a homosexual, and not even too swift as a detective. At least the film is accomplished with talent, but it leaves a disquieting feeling of dissatisfaction seeing a heroic figure fail so many ways. The character one is lead to empathize with the most with loses at the end ... most irregular. Watch at your own peril.

  • Jun 12, 2015

    Well I had to watch something with Christopher Lee in it, didn't I?

    Well I had to watch something with Christopher Lee in it, didn't I?

  • Apr 19, 2015

    Focused more on the character of Arthur Conan Doyle's famous detective rather than solving a mystery. The film take place in the quiet movements of life between his famous mysteries. Holmes is very human and not the idealized character of the novels here, shown here as a depressed, drug addicted and a closeted homosexual. It's a melancholy film where director Billy Wilder and co-writer I.A.L. Diamond mix comedy and drama quite well as they have done before in classics like "The Apartment" and "The Fortune Cookie." the film does't have a strong narrative, being an episodic film, but the characters, particularly Robert Stephens as Holmes is enough to carry the film. It's also kind of strange to see Wilder doing a costume/period film. Most of his films seemed strongly "American." Even films like "Irma La Douce" still had American stars, but this film feels very British. I've been reading the Cameron Crowe interview book "Conversations with Wilder" and he doesn't really seem to have an opinion if there he had a preferred cut of this film. It's one that for many years had lost episodes that were cut from the original theatrical release, but which in recent years have been found and restored. Regardless, the film is still quite strong and is somewhat unique among Wilder films. Colin Blakely plays Watson and Christoper Lee steals all of his scenes as Holmes smarter brother, Mycroft Holmes. Geneviève Page also appears and there is a fine score by Miklós Rózsa, that I think stands among his best film scores.

    Focused more on the character of Arthur Conan Doyle's famous detective rather than solving a mystery. The film take place in the quiet movements of life between his famous mysteries. Holmes is very human and not the idealized character of the novels here, shown here as a depressed, drug addicted and a closeted homosexual. It's a melancholy film where director Billy Wilder and co-writer I.A.L. Diamond mix comedy and drama quite well as they have done before in classics like "The Apartment" and "The Fortune Cookie." the film does't have a strong narrative, being an episodic film, but the characters, particularly Robert Stephens as Holmes is enough to carry the film. It's also kind of strange to see Wilder doing a costume/period film. Most of his films seemed strongly "American." Even films like "Irma La Douce" still had American stars, but this film feels very British. I've been reading the Cameron Crowe interview book "Conversations with Wilder" and he doesn't really seem to have an opinion if there he had a preferred cut of this film. It's one that for many years had lost episodes that were cut from the original theatrical release, but which in recent years have been found and restored. Regardless, the film is still quite strong and is somewhat unique among Wilder films. Colin Blakely plays Watson and Christoper Lee steals all of his scenes as Holmes smarter brother, Mycroft Holmes. Geneviève Page also appears and there is a fine score by Miklós Rózsa, that I think stands among his best film scores.

  • Mar 29, 2015

    It was a brave idea for the time it got released,still it was another Sherlock Holmes mystery and not a very exciting one.

    It was a brave idea for the time it got released,still it was another Sherlock Holmes mystery and not a very exciting one.