Red Planet Mars - Movie Reviews - Rotten Tomatoes

Red Planet Mars Reviews

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½ March 6, 2016
Idiotic beyond words, illogical, zero special effects--Could not even believe how lame brained stupid this wretched garbage was.
January 9, 2016
I've finally found Donald Trump's campaign outline :)
April 7, 2013
For a sci-fi movie, this had an extremely noticeable lack of effects. In an era with television and telephone, the US is trying to speak to Mars using not images or voices, but Morse code. A whole lot of pseudo-scientific gobbledygook comes out of Peter Graves, making an already action-less movie even duller. This amounts to a bunch of talking heads with heavily religious overtones smacking you in the face so hard you'd think they used a sledgehammer.
January 3, 2013
Surprisingly, an epistemological film. Ultimately anti-science, pro-Christianity, but developed in a way that causes the viewer to ask questions about how he knows or believes that which he knows or believes. There's a little Cold War drama thrown in, but it's merely backdrop, context.
May 5, 2012
McCarthyesque scaremongering masquerading as sci-fi? A science fiction movie with virtually no science and precious little fiction it instead is a cheap shot at the evils of Nazi's and the Russians and how they threaten the average American and his way of life. This kind of propaganda has pervaded the minds of millions of people and amusingly the movie attempts to flip-flop the same dogma and shine a light back on itself.

The movie is either the most pandering indictment of mass hysteria being used to control the masses or a searing jibe at it's use, wrapped up so snug that it cant be accused of doing exactly that.
April 18, 2012
imaginative but prolix futuristic film
March 3, 2012
This is an early 50s Sci-Fi movie that will have you scratching your head.
Peter Graves stars as a scientist who sends a signal to Mars and gets an actual call back from real Martians. The Martians give Graves messages that send the world into a panic, apparently because we Earthlings are jealous of the the Martians' technology. World markets collapse, crime spikes, Labor Unions freakout (not surprising), etc. Graves also receives a proxy message from Mars, originally delivered by God. This message changes the world into a peaceful, religious place practically overnight. But hold on, the Russians have been eavesdropping so trouble is bound to ensue.
This movie contains absolutely no visuals of Martians, space battles or anything else that amounts to anything more than a left over stage prop. But somehow it almost works. Many will think that this is a thinly veiled commantary on McCarthyism. Others will sour on its overtly religious theme, and that's okay. I honestly can't decide what I think of it.
February 19, 2012
I know it was made in 1952 but its still just so bad, so Aliens, no bad special effects and no mars at all its all a bunch of talk. It was worth watching to see them bag the shit out of it on film sack, but it was just a bad movie made when movies were pretty bad.
February 4, 2012
Pretty disgraceful Anti-communist and Christian propaganda, thinly disguised as a dry sci-fi drama. The second half descends into a religious reawakening and the collapse of communism, following preaching from God, who lives on Mars. The cast includes Peter Graves, Morris Ankrum, Walter Sande and Tom Keene.
Super Reviewer
½ November 7, 2010
One of the most interesting sci-fi movies of the fifties, I highly recommend checking it out.
½ August 15, 2010
An interesting entry in the 1950s B-Movie sci-fi canon because it features no aliens, monsters, or space trips but instead is merely about broadcasts being sent and supposedly receives from Mars. Ultimately, the film is a meditation on US/Soviet relations and the potential of religion to radically alter the entire structure of civilization. Again, this is really a comment on the U.S.S.R. since they were a "godless nation" at the time and since the film imagines a Soviet revolution based on religious principles. The film is overly cheesy but an intersting social document and is ultimately enjoyable for fans of B-movies.
½ March 13, 2010
I was expecting jetpacks and disintegration. I instead got a story about religion and how Nazis hate everyone, still.
flixsterman
Super Reviewer
½ November 30, 2009
Due to the elliptical nature of Mar's orbit, only rarely does it come close enough to Earth to afford a clear view of it's geography. When it does, supposedly in 1952, scientists notice that the huge ice mountains of the poles have been melted into water and channeled to large cities spread across the landscape, proving the existence of life on the red planet. Coincidentally, a remarkable invention known as the "Hydrogen Valve" has just been developed, enabling the sending of coded messages across the vast expanse of space. Now Earth can communicate with those industrious water channelers so very far away. But, the question is, what will they say? Will they end hunger, disease and misery on Earth? Will they advance our technology? Are they friendly? Could they be... possibly... Christians?!?!?
½ June 14, 2009
An interesting entry in the 1950s B-Movie sci-fi canon because it features no aliens, monsters, or space trips but instead is merely about broadcasts being sent and supposedly receives from Mars. Ultimately, the film is a meditation on US/Soviet relations and the potential of religion to radically alter the entire structure of civilization. Again, this is really a comment on the U.S.S.R. since they were a "godless nation" at the time and since the film imagines a Soviet revolution based on religious principles. The film is overly cheesy but an intersting social document and is ultimately enjoyable for fans of B-movies.
January 26, 2009
Red Planet Mars started off as a pretty cool example of early 50's SF. Unfortunately, about half-way through it degenerated into a pious, Christian goody-goody preach-fest. A characteristic unfortunately often found in other early 50's Hollywood offerings.

I have to admit, the transition from SF schlock to religious preachy schlock was so unexpected that I continued to watch for a few more minutes in the hopes that it was just a phase the director was temporarily going through.

Sadly, that was not the case. Fast-forwarding through the remaining 1/2 of the movie only confirmed that "Red Planet Mars" was merely another sad example of the 50's interpretation of our American Puritan heritage.
July 28, 2008
What if you awoke tomorrow to the news that TV transmissions from Mars have been received, transmissions that reveal to be from an intelligent Martian civilization of cheap Martian power and non-capitalist industry? What would become of this world or these United States of the Eisenhower administration? Especially if those transmissions turn out to be from GOD himself? ‚?¶Find out.
It plays Thursday Aug. 31 at The Vortex Room- 9PM -1082 Howard-SF
½ June 5, 2008
Am I the only one genuinely impressed by the concept? It's brilliant!
½ February 17, 2008
A very silly film. Not surprisingly, the DVD release is by a company called Cheezy Flicks. How appropriate! A good example of hte kind of technophobia which often appears in Science Fiction (particularly in the Andrea King character). I was particularly interested in the scene where the scientist and his wife, upon learning that the messages they believed to be from Mars were a hoax, are prepared to blow themselves up to prevent the public from being told the truth. This scene resonates with the whole Christian message of the movie, since, in my experience, most religious people would sooner die than admit the truth. The final line of the film, where the two children whose parents have just been killed are told by the Admiral, "You lucky boys, you're their sons," sounds incredibly hollow. Who wrote this rubbish?
½ December 21, 2007
I like it. Young Peter Graves is at least as good in the starring role as he was in the TV Series Mission: Impossible.
½ August 16, 2007
Despite the campy religious and political overtones this is a freat piece of work.
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