The Right Stuff Reviews

  • Nov 17, 2020

    One of my favorites. (Ex military in my heart but my butt was stationed at a computer as an officer in the quartermaster dept.). A tribute to the great Col. Yeager who was screwed over because he was a mustang (officer who rose from enlisted - no college degree). He was the best in my book even before seeing this movie 1983, 87, 95, 2020 or reading the book in 1981 1st time & 1998. I didn't realize to to that Mrs. Glen was played by Emily & Zoey Daschenel mom? The movie just great as is the book and that is that. No b.s. & again in 1997.

    One of my favorites. (Ex military in my heart but my butt was stationed at a computer as an officer in the quartermaster dept.). A tribute to the great Col. Yeager who was screwed over because he was a mustang (officer who rose from enlisted - no college degree). He was the best in my book even before seeing this movie 1983, 87, 95, 2020 or reading the book in 1981 1st time & 1998. I didn't realize to to that Mrs. Glen was played by Emily & Zoey Daschenel mom? The movie just great as is the book and that is that. No b.s. & again in 1997.

  • Nov 14, 2020

    Lifetime fan of this film, watched it as a child when it came out and enjoying since.

    Lifetime fan of this film, watched it as a child when it came out and enjoying since.

  • Nov 13, 2020

    Director and screenwriter Philip Kaufman does a remarkable job condensing Tom Wolfe's The Right Stuff into an entertaining and riveting film. Starting in the mid-1940s and covering almost twenty years, the movie leads us to the early stages of the American space program, focusing primarily on the Mercury Seven pilots selected for the Project Mercury initiative. Episodic in nature, The Right Stuff moves along at a nice clip despite the three-hour running time, helped along by an impressive cast. If there are any complaints, it might be the fact that because there are so many characters, creating any kind of in-depth character development is virtually impossible.

    Director and screenwriter Philip Kaufman does a remarkable job condensing Tom Wolfe's The Right Stuff into an entertaining and riveting film. Starting in the mid-1940s and covering almost twenty years, the movie leads us to the early stages of the American space program, focusing primarily on the Mercury Seven pilots selected for the Project Mercury initiative. Episodic in nature, The Right Stuff moves along at a nice clip despite the three-hour running time, helped along by an impressive cast. If there are any complaints, it might be the fact that because there are so many characters, creating any kind of in-depth character development is virtually impossible.

  • Oct 30, 2020

    I love a film that is usually about 3 hours like Dances with Wolves, The Irishman, and Lawrence of Arabia, This I love I think it is an excellent peace of work but it is slow (VERY SLOW and that is the one issue I have with this film. (NO SPOILERS) The film is about the piolets who tested and the first to fly into space to beat the USSR. The film has an excellent score which feel very poetic. The editing was good but their were a few useless scenes. THE writing is great, the dialogue is also great and the characters as well. I wish this film won Best Picture but they all lost to Terms of Endearment. Over all if you don't like 3 hour movies this might not be the one for you but I still recommend you watch it. This film is a 9.6/10.

    I love a film that is usually about 3 hours like Dances with Wolves, The Irishman, and Lawrence of Arabia, This I love I think it is an excellent peace of work but it is slow (VERY SLOW and that is the one issue I have with this film. (NO SPOILERS) The film is about the piolets who tested and the first to fly into space to beat the USSR. The film has an excellent score which feel very poetic. The editing was good but their were a few useless scenes. THE writing is great, the dialogue is also great and the characters as well. I wish this film won Best Picture but they all lost to Terms of Endearment. Over all if you don't like 3 hour movies this might not be the one for you but I still recommend you watch it. This film is a 9.6/10.

  • Jul 14, 2020

    A bit long but interesting and well acted.

    A bit long but interesting and well acted.

  • Jun 19, 2020

    Outstanding cast and brilliant direction bring this story of the beginnings of America's space program to life.

    Outstanding cast and brilliant direction bring this story of the beginnings of America's space program to life.

  • Apr 18, 2020

    Perhaps the best film you've never seen. Remarkable work by the the entire cast, crew, and writer. A must see.

    Perhaps the best film you've never seen. Remarkable work by the the entire cast, crew, and writer. A must see.

  • Mar 16, 2020

    saw it again after many years. a movie to never forget. brilliant on every way .

    saw it again after many years. a movie to never forget. brilliant on every way .

  • Dec 29, 2019

    A visually awesome film with some brave camera work and special effects, bold and ambitious, and interesting characterizations, but marred by an ambivalent point of view and some profanity.

    A visually awesome film with some brave camera work and special effects, bold and ambitious, and interesting characterizations, but marred by an ambivalent point of view and some profanity.

  • Dec 15, 2019

    Three hour films can often feel like a real chore as it is difficult to keep a film feeling urgent and lively for that period of time while also keeping characters and smaller details in mind. This is a film that hardly feels as long as it is because director Philip Kaufman miraculously pulls together the stories of several different astronauts to present the audience with a vision of mid-century America and what drove these men to achieve so highly. The film is funny without losing sight of the inherent drama of men putting their lives on the line and it is a miracle that the screenplay balances all of these elements without feeling weighty or jarring at any moment. If it had been any other year this film would have been deserving of being named Best Picture but my personal affection for Terms of Endearment (1983) prevents me from considering it the best in the lineup. Pilot Chuck Yeager, Sam Shepard, breaks the sound barrier in 1947 despite having broken his ribs while out horse riding with his carefree wife Glennis Yeager, Barbara Hershey. He continues to push himself as other pilots break his records but with the introduction of arrogant younger pilots Deke Slayton, Scott Paulin, Gordo Cooper, Dennis Quaid, and Gus Grissom, Fred Ward, his era would appear to be coming to an end. The three younger pilots pursue careers as astronauts and are put through strenuous tests before being selected as one of the original seven astronauts. Joining them are the media savvy John Glenn, Ed Harris, and the immature Alan Shepard, Scott Glenn, who both struggle to handle the new pressures of becoming an astronaut. The men eventually band together after initially clashing and support one another as they are each launched into space. This is one of those epics where you feel that you truly know the characters, their relationships and their motives at the end of the film while also having a sense of the greater events occurring around them. Each character is set up wonderfully as the first thirty minutes is devoted to establishing Yeager as the "Ace of all aces" and showing why every pilot that came after him modeled themselves upon him. The film continues to weave new characters into it's story as the cocky Cooper is immediately shown to be an unlikable figure and we appreciate the fact that he is cut down a little when he meets the other pilots but through his relationship with his wife he is humanized. Fortunately this is not one of those films where the relatives of the main characters have a few obligatory scenes in which they express their concern over their husbands dying and are afraid of the impact the press have on their children. This film is unafraid to show the women lapping up the media coverage as Grissom's wife Betty, Veronia Cartwright, is angry about the fact that she will not be able to meet Jackie Kennedy due to her husband's minor failure. Yes, Glenn's wife has a speech impediment and does not want to face the media and in one scene the wives commiserate over the dangers their husbands face but the wives become so much more than that and are the sort of flawed individuals that we see in real life. The film is also a technical marvel as the aerial sequences are extraordinary and have you on the edge of your seat despite knowing that most of these men will survive. The sympathy that you feel for Grissom as he flails around in the water after nervously breaking free of his pod by pushing at the escape hatch, against orders, is drawn from the fact that Kaufman is unrelenting in displaying his struggle as he thrashes around and contrasts this with the calmness with which the operators extract the pod from the water. Glenn's horrific fall to earth while his ship is on fire is seen largely through a close up shot on the terrified eyes of Harris but one is still dazzled by the special effects employed to show all of the splendor of being in space. The film deservedly won Academy Awards in all of the categories that it was nominated in and as a technical achievement it still impresses 36 years later. The emotional heart of the film is Yeager as we see the man who gave life to the idea of a pilot be passed over in favor of a younger generation. He drops out of the film for long periods of time but his presence is felt as his influence is acknowledged towards the end of the film in an answer given by Cooper to a television reporter when asked who the greatest pilot in the world is. Throughout the film he has told his wife that he is the best with total self assurance but as he begins to talk he realizes that it is in fact Yeager who deserves the recognition. The end of the film serves as a tribute to Yeager as he heads out on one more flight to prove that he still has it and despite having to eject himself from his plane he shows that he is just as tough as any man half his age. The performances are uniformly excellent as several well known stars settle into their roles and we are able to divorce our expectations of them from the roles they play. Shepard gets one of the best parts as the determined Yeager with his hard stare and ability to convey a great deal of emotion in just a stare. Most of the characters are "good old boys" and we have to believe that they are larrikins of sorts so there would have been plenty of room for broad characterization but all of them resist this temptation. Quaid is brilliant with his irritating little grin as he convinces as a man with little self awareness but he matures effectively into a figure who is still a goof but who respects his fellow astronauts. It is hard to imagine anybody other than Harris playing Glenn as he brings a conviction and passion to the part that few other actors could have. The performers should have received more recognition for their work as while it is easy to see the film only as a technical achievement it excels on other levels too.

    Three hour films can often feel like a real chore as it is difficult to keep a film feeling urgent and lively for that period of time while also keeping characters and smaller details in mind. This is a film that hardly feels as long as it is because director Philip Kaufman miraculously pulls together the stories of several different astronauts to present the audience with a vision of mid-century America and what drove these men to achieve so highly. The film is funny without losing sight of the inherent drama of men putting their lives on the line and it is a miracle that the screenplay balances all of these elements without feeling weighty or jarring at any moment. If it had been any other year this film would have been deserving of being named Best Picture but my personal affection for Terms of Endearment (1983) prevents me from considering it the best in the lineup. Pilot Chuck Yeager, Sam Shepard, breaks the sound barrier in 1947 despite having broken his ribs while out horse riding with his carefree wife Glennis Yeager, Barbara Hershey. He continues to push himself as other pilots break his records but with the introduction of arrogant younger pilots Deke Slayton, Scott Paulin, Gordo Cooper, Dennis Quaid, and Gus Grissom, Fred Ward, his era would appear to be coming to an end. The three younger pilots pursue careers as astronauts and are put through strenuous tests before being selected as one of the original seven astronauts. Joining them are the media savvy John Glenn, Ed Harris, and the immature Alan Shepard, Scott Glenn, who both struggle to handle the new pressures of becoming an astronaut. The men eventually band together after initially clashing and support one another as they are each launched into space. This is one of those epics where you feel that you truly know the characters, their relationships and their motives at the end of the film while also having a sense of the greater events occurring around them. Each character is set up wonderfully as the first thirty minutes is devoted to establishing Yeager as the "Ace of all aces" and showing why every pilot that came after him modeled themselves upon him. The film continues to weave new characters into it's story as the cocky Cooper is immediately shown to be an unlikable figure and we appreciate the fact that he is cut down a little when he meets the other pilots but through his relationship with his wife he is humanized. Fortunately this is not one of those films where the relatives of the main characters have a few obligatory scenes in which they express their concern over their husbands dying and are afraid of the impact the press have on their children. This film is unafraid to show the women lapping up the media coverage as Grissom's wife Betty, Veronia Cartwright, is angry about the fact that she will not be able to meet Jackie Kennedy due to her husband's minor failure. Yes, Glenn's wife has a speech impediment and does not want to face the media and in one scene the wives commiserate over the dangers their husbands face but the wives become so much more than that and are the sort of flawed individuals that we see in real life. The film is also a technical marvel as the aerial sequences are extraordinary and have you on the edge of your seat despite knowing that most of these men will survive. The sympathy that you feel for Grissom as he flails around in the water after nervously breaking free of his pod by pushing at the escape hatch, against orders, is drawn from the fact that Kaufman is unrelenting in displaying his struggle as he thrashes around and contrasts this with the calmness with which the operators extract the pod from the water. Glenn's horrific fall to earth while his ship is on fire is seen largely through a close up shot on the terrified eyes of Harris but one is still dazzled by the special effects employed to show all of the splendor of being in space. The film deservedly won Academy Awards in all of the categories that it was nominated in and as a technical achievement it still impresses 36 years later. The emotional heart of the film is Yeager as we see the man who gave life to the idea of a pilot be passed over in favor of a younger generation. He drops out of the film for long periods of time but his presence is felt as his influence is acknowledged towards the end of the film in an answer given by Cooper to a television reporter when asked who the greatest pilot in the world is. Throughout the film he has told his wife that he is the best with total self assurance but as he begins to talk he realizes that it is in fact Yeager who deserves the recognition. The end of the film serves as a tribute to Yeager as he heads out on one more flight to prove that he still has it and despite having to eject himself from his plane he shows that he is just as tough as any man half his age. The performances are uniformly excellent as several well known stars settle into their roles and we are able to divorce our expectations of them from the roles they play. Shepard gets one of the best parts as the determined Yeager with his hard stare and ability to convey a great deal of emotion in just a stare. Most of the characters are "good old boys" and we have to believe that they are larrikins of sorts so there would have been plenty of room for broad characterization but all of them resist this temptation. Quaid is brilliant with his irritating little grin as he convinces as a man with little self awareness but he matures effectively into a figure who is still a goof but who respects his fellow astronauts. It is hard to imagine anybody other than Harris playing Glenn as he brings a conviction and passion to the part that few other actors could have. The performers should have received more recognition for their work as while it is easy to see the film only as a technical achievement it excels on other levels too.