Rivers and Tides: Andy Goldsworthy Working With Time Reviews

  • Jan 30, 2016

    Well made documentary with excellent cinematography.

    Well made documentary with excellent cinematography.

  • Mar 26, 2014

    His art's so pretty it would be easy to dismiss as superficial, but here it's obvious he's completely genuine, and his work's simplicity hides immense effort and determination.

    His art's so pretty it would be easy to dismiss as superficial, but here it's obvious he's completely genuine, and his work's simplicity hides immense effort and determination.

  • Mar 25, 2014

    What extraordinary patience.

    What extraordinary patience.

  • Mar 25, 2014

    Depressing and boring

    Depressing and boring

  • Mar 25, 2014

    I love this guys art... and I only just discovered he has a piece at the Meijer's Sculpture Garden. I wonder if there are any more in Michigan... I should try and find out...

    I love this guys art... and I only just discovered he has a piece at the Meijer's Sculpture Garden. I wonder if there are any more in Michigan... I should try and find out...

  • Mar 25, 2014

    Stunning. Riedelsheimer's film is at least as good as Goldsworthy's constructions, though they become so interdependent that it's hard to determine where one leaves off and the other begins. First viewing, just let it run over you in real time as an extremely good documentary of Goldsworthy's art, much of which is as transient as an individual film frame. Second viewing, take your time, try to figure out how Riedelsheimer DID some of these shots. There's one scene where the camera flies down a creek like a radio-controlled toy helicopter, swooping close to the rocks, just above the water. In another, the camera suddenly cranes up and swivels to look directly down into one of Goldsworthy's scuptures ... but this appears to take place far from the nearest road. Camera moves usually done in a well-equipped studio take place on a sandy Nova Scotia beach or down a rocky Scottish stream. And watch the light, sunlight making the ice scuptures glow or rimming the edge of a stone wall. Whew!

    Stunning. Riedelsheimer's film is at least as good as Goldsworthy's constructions, though they become so interdependent that it's hard to determine where one leaves off and the other begins. First viewing, just let it run over you in real time as an extremely good documentary of Goldsworthy's art, much of which is as transient as an individual film frame. Second viewing, take your time, try to figure out how Riedelsheimer DID some of these shots. There's one scene where the camera flies down a creek like a radio-controlled toy helicopter, swooping close to the rocks, just above the water. In another, the camera suddenly cranes up and swivels to look directly down into one of Goldsworthy's scuptures ... but this appears to take place far from the nearest road. Camera moves usually done in a well-equipped studio take place on a sandy Nova Scotia beach or down a rocky Scottish stream. And watch the light, sunlight making the ice scuptures glow or rimming the edge of a stone wall. Whew!

  • Mar 25, 2014

    ona recent journey to patagonia, i met sandy sudar, an "eco artista visual" and i immediately recmmened that she see this documentary of the work of the "nature" artist andy goldsworthy. back home, i viewed it again, convinced that its inspiring message deserves multiple exposures

    ona recent journey to patagonia, i met sandy sudar, an "eco artista visual" and i immediately recmmened that she see this documentary of the work of the "nature" artist andy goldsworthy. back home, i viewed it again, convinced that its inspiring message deserves multiple exposures

  • Mar 25, 2014

    In understanding the art behind Goldsworthy, one must enter the realm between nature and artistic fiction. If you are visionary enough, you might just find out that this realm is something worth capturing

    In understanding the art behind Goldsworthy, one must enter the realm between nature and artistic fiction. If you are visionary enough, you might just find out that this realm is something worth capturing

  • Mar 25, 2014

    A slow-going documentary about an artist who creates often-temporary designs in nature that erode before the camera. I found the footage of his work interesting, but the interviews with him pretty dull.

    A slow-going documentary about an artist who creates often-temporary designs in nature that erode before the camera. I found the footage of his work interesting, but the interviews with him pretty dull.

  • Mar 25, 2014

    This is the most hilariously overrated film I’ve seen in recent memory. It made me laugh harder than Superbad. And the piles of lavishing praise shown in these reviews take me to an extremely cynical place with the epiphany that Art is truly a minor part of peoples’ lives. Even professional film critics (paired with the “user comments” of gullible civilians like/unlike yours truly) reserve a small window for the seeming “fine” arts, and whatever cow patty splats at their feet conveniently gets awarded the quota. To be ironic and yet truthful, I highly recommend this film for some of the funniest moments in cinematic history. You will be cheering for Andy’s little nature puzzles to collapse by the first quarter-hour, and when they do, it’s devilish fun.

    This is the most hilariously overrated film I’ve seen in recent memory. It made me laugh harder than Superbad. And the piles of lavishing praise shown in these reviews take me to an extremely cynical place with the epiphany that Art is truly a minor part of peoples’ lives. Even professional film critics (paired with the “user comments” of gullible civilians like/unlike yours truly) reserve a small window for the seeming “fine” arts, and whatever cow patty splats at their feet conveniently gets awarded the quota. To be ironic and yet truthful, I highly recommend this film for some of the funniest moments in cinematic history. You will be cheering for Andy’s little nature puzzles to collapse by the first quarter-hour, and when they do, it’s devilish fun.