Robin and the Seven Hoods Reviews

  • Jan 31, 2021

    Such a great Gangster Musical! Filled with amazing singers and legends!

    Such a great Gangster Musical! Filled with amazing singers and legends!

  • Dec 15, 2020

    A classic. I loved it. Great cast! Great music.

    A classic. I loved it. Great cast! Great music.

  • Nov 25, 2020

    Classic with 4 of the best singer entertainers ever Old Blue Eyes, Sammy, Der Bingle and Dino.

    Classic with 4 of the best singer entertainers ever Old Blue Eyes, Sammy, Der Bingle and Dino.

  • Jun 10, 2020

    You can’t go wrong with a film with the Rat Pack. However it does seem to drag a bit. Still good fun

    You can’t go wrong with a film with the Rat Pack. However it does seem to drag a bit. Still good fun

  • Kevin M. W Super Reviewer
    Oct 23, 2019

    Sinatra (as producer) knew a little something about the movie biz by 1964: just give the yokels what they want. And so while the entire shebang is only an excuse to give the cast of singers a chance to do their thing, there's the whole goofball Damon Runyon Guys and Dolls schtick that folks seem to enjoy, that story about forest dwelling do-gooders fighting for the regular folks, people get a kick out of that, and finally (but foremost) the Rat Pack, assuring everybody that everything's gonna be A-OK. Charm by the bulk, by jingo. Why they're giving the stuff away. And who's best at it? There's the heart of gold at the center of this tasty feast, everyone gets their shot. Der Bingle, Dean-o, Sammy, Peter Falk and Barbara Rush, it's like they planned it. Like a heist.

    Sinatra (as producer) knew a little something about the movie biz by 1964: just give the yokels what they want. And so while the entire shebang is only an excuse to give the cast of singers a chance to do their thing, there's the whole goofball Damon Runyon Guys and Dolls schtick that folks seem to enjoy, that story about forest dwelling do-gooders fighting for the regular folks, people get a kick out of that, and finally (but foremost) the Rat Pack, assuring everybody that everything's gonna be A-OK. Charm by the bulk, by jingo. Why they're giving the stuff away. And who's best at it? There's the heart of gold at the center of this tasty feast, everyone gets their shot. Der Bingle, Dean-o, Sammy, Peter Falk and Barbara Rush, it's like they planned it. Like a heist.

  • Jul 02, 2019

    Robin and the 7 Hoods is a movie that starts out feeling like a modernized take on the Robin Hood legend, but it kind of drops the allegory early on. Despite having characters all with those famous names, this isn’t about someone who robs from the rich to feed the poor, even if he puts on a front to make you think that’s what he’s doing. In reality, this is the story of two rival gang leaders seeking to take control of Chicago after their Kingpin is killed. I saw this once when I was young because my dad was trying to show me some of the stuff he watched when he was my age. I didn’t remember much about it when watching it this time, but I liked it a lot. The cast is overflowing with amazing talent, and they don’t squander it. We get to see all the marvelous members of the Rat Pack, with the incomparable Bing Crosby standing in for some of the less interesting members of the team. Not only that, but they made the movie a musical and allowed us to enjoy these talented singers doing what they do even better than acting. The story is kind of goofy, but I enjoy that aspect of it. This is a movie that is all about having a good time, and not taking things too seriously. I had a blast watching to see what kind of trick the two rival gangs would pull on one another. There’s one particular scene that is definitely the highlight of the film for me, when Robin and the 7 Hoods stage an elaborate con in order to avoid getting shut down by the police. It’s delightful, and it doesn’t hurt that Peter Falk is playing the rival gang leader. He has a way of acting tough as nails while still being completely hilarious. I’ll admit, the plot doesn’t flow all that well. For example: the romance/relationship angle doesn’t work for me, because it doesn’t seem to connect to everything else that is going on. It’s almost like they made Sinatra’s character a bit too competent, so they felt they needed to create an internal conflict for the gang, but it comes out of nowhere and goes nowhere. I kind of wish they had leaned even harder into the musical aspect of the film as well. I still found Robin and the 7 Hoods a ton of fun. This is a flawed movie where there’s just enough going right to compensate for anything that went wrong.

    Robin and the 7 Hoods is a movie that starts out feeling like a modernized take on the Robin Hood legend, but it kind of drops the allegory early on. Despite having characters all with those famous names, this isn’t about someone who robs from the rich to feed the poor, even if he puts on a front to make you think that’s what he’s doing. In reality, this is the story of two rival gang leaders seeking to take control of Chicago after their Kingpin is killed. I saw this once when I was young because my dad was trying to show me some of the stuff he watched when he was my age. I didn’t remember much about it when watching it this time, but I liked it a lot. The cast is overflowing with amazing talent, and they don’t squander it. We get to see all the marvelous members of the Rat Pack, with the incomparable Bing Crosby standing in for some of the less interesting members of the team. Not only that, but they made the movie a musical and allowed us to enjoy these talented singers doing what they do even better than acting. The story is kind of goofy, but I enjoy that aspect of it. This is a movie that is all about having a good time, and not taking things too seriously. I had a blast watching to see what kind of trick the two rival gangs would pull on one another. There’s one particular scene that is definitely the highlight of the film for me, when Robin and the 7 Hoods stage an elaborate con in order to avoid getting shut down by the police. It’s delightful, and it doesn’t hurt that Peter Falk is playing the rival gang leader. He has a way of acting tough as nails while still being completely hilarious. I’ll admit, the plot doesn’t flow all that well. For example: the romance/relationship angle doesn’t work for me, because it doesn’t seem to connect to everything else that is going on. It’s almost like they made Sinatra’s character a bit too competent, so they felt they needed to create an internal conflict for the gang, but it comes out of nowhere and goes nowhere. I kind of wish they had leaned even harder into the musical aspect of the film as well. I still found Robin and the 7 Hoods a ton of fun. This is a flawed movie where there’s just enough going right to compensate for anything that went wrong.

  • Jun 21, 2019

    Great movie. Entertaining. And amazing music

    Great movie. Entertaining. And amazing music

  • Feb 02, 2019

    The best movie song ever sung: My Kind of Town!

    The best movie song ever sung: My Kind of Town!

  • Oct 20, 2018

    Colorful, tuneful riff on the Robin Hood legend with the Rat Pack having a high old time; musical highlights include Sammy Davis Jr. singing and dancing to "Bang! Bang!," Sinatra, Martin and Crosby hamming it up to "Style," and Frank singing the Oscar-nominated "My Kind of Town."

    Colorful, tuneful riff on the Robin Hood legend with the Rat Pack having a high old time; musical highlights include Sammy Davis Jr. singing and dancing to "Bang! Bang!," Sinatra, Martin and Crosby hamming it up to "Style," and Frank singing the Oscar-nominated "My Kind of Town."

  • Jul 05, 2018

    Perhaps, once upon a time, there was an audience for the Rat Pack pictures (starring Frank Sinatra, Dean Martin, and Sammy Davis, Jr., and here with Peter Falk as their nemesis and Bing Crosby as a fellow traveller). I thought it would be interesting for kitsch-value - but alas, not true. Instead, the film is rather plodding, hoping to skate along on its stars' charisma (certainly not their acting) and therefore coming across as not much more than a rehashed 1940s gangster pic with a bunch of "dad jokes" and some rather weird musical numbers. The only hit tune is "Chicago, My Kind of Town"-but Sinatra's listless delivery doesn't really rouse the troops. Crosby is given little to work with, though makes the best of his (comic?) part, whereas Martin is so laid back he doesn't really seem to care if he's in the picture or not. I was hoping for better when the curtain opened on "Big Jim" (classic gangster Edward G. Robinson) - but he is soon shot dead, leaving room for gang war between Falk and Sinatra, with Big Jim's daughter, played by Barbara Rush, doing her best to manipulate all of the men into letting her run the town. Sinatra and his gang decide to give the money meant to bribe them over to charity - hence the title and Robin Hood analogy (Sinatra's character is "Robbo"). I could go on but I'll spare you. This isn't a bad movie really but there are far better ways to spend your time, unless you are part of the audience that once upon a time this picture was made for.

    Perhaps, once upon a time, there was an audience for the Rat Pack pictures (starring Frank Sinatra, Dean Martin, and Sammy Davis, Jr., and here with Peter Falk as their nemesis and Bing Crosby as a fellow traveller). I thought it would be interesting for kitsch-value - but alas, not true. Instead, the film is rather plodding, hoping to skate along on its stars' charisma (certainly not their acting) and therefore coming across as not much more than a rehashed 1940s gangster pic with a bunch of "dad jokes" and some rather weird musical numbers. The only hit tune is "Chicago, My Kind of Town"-but Sinatra's listless delivery doesn't really rouse the troops. Crosby is given little to work with, though makes the best of his (comic?) part, whereas Martin is so laid back he doesn't really seem to care if he's in the picture or not. I was hoping for better when the curtain opened on "Big Jim" (classic gangster Edward G. Robinson) - but he is soon shot dead, leaving room for gang war between Falk and Sinatra, with Big Jim's daughter, played by Barbara Rush, doing her best to manipulate all of the men into letting her run the town. Sinatra and his gang decide to give the money meant to bribe them over to charity - hence the title and Robin Hood analogy (Sinatra's character is "Robbo"). I could go on but I'll spare you. This isn't a bad movie really but there are far better ways to spend your time, unless you are part of the audience that once upon a time this picture was made for.