Five Favorite Films with Emily Blunt

Plus, the star of this week's Salmon Fishing in the Yemen on working with Ewan McGregor, her forthcoming comedy with Jason Segel, and reprising that Devil Wears Prada role.

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Well, speaking of fish -- you just chose Jaws to promote Salmon Fishing, right?

Emily Blunt: [Laughs] Exactly. Anything to do with sea life.

So did you find yourself at that point in your career where you're thinking, "I really want to do a fishing movie"?

[Laughs] No. I don't really like eating fish, apart from sushi, and I wouldn't count myself a very good fisherwoman, but I loved how unique the story was, and how it just seemed to step out from the crowd of generic scripts that you read. It was just so hopeful and lovely and I loved the characters -- I thought they were all kind of flawed and they were all going through something, these and life transitions. So I thought it would be fun to play.

Your character's name -- Harriet Chetwode-Talbot -- is somehow very amusing; especially every time Ewan says it in his accent.

[Laughs] Yeah. I like the way he says it in his accent as well. I really loved her name and I thought it said a lot about her as well. I knew where she came from and what she was about. It's a very revealing name in a way.

You said you felt like you and Ewan were "separated at birth." What was it that clicked so well between you?

I don't know, I mean we just seemed to have this very accelerated friendship and we got along like a house on fire. We laughed -- we laughed so much together, and so it did sort of feel like I'd known him forever. I have found that whenever I have had a chemistry with someone on screen it's usually benefited from having a really warm rapport with them off screen. I think I was really lucky with Ewan. I mean everyone has chemistry with Ewan -- it's impossible not to have chemistry with him. He's one of the most well-loved people in this industry. Everyone loves Ewan.

Part of the chemistry must come from having a good director, and Lasse Hallström seems to do this kind of movie so effortlessly. What's he like?

He's incredible. He's so wonderfully odd as a person. He's quirky in the most lovely way. He has really wacky ideas for stuff, but mainly he just creates a really lovely environment on set -- it's very atmospheric set, so you can establish chemistry, you can just work without stress and find new bits of sparkle, new bits of nuance. He creates that, so it's very much all about the actors. He's heaven to work with, really.

Were you bringing moments to the film that weren't on the page?

Yeah, and he was very encouraging of it. He was very encouraging to keep making the moments more and more alive. It wasn't that we needed to change the script that much, it's just that when you get there on set, sometimes -- if the scene doesn't read as you'd imagined it -- you have to find a different route to make it work. Lasse's all about adapting and making it work; and adding. He's a very layered director.

You shot in London and the Scottish Highlands and Morocco -- it wasn't just a holiday, I hope.

[Laughs] No. We were doing six day weeks in Morocco, which is quite tiring; but the environment was so fabulous. We were sitting in Bedouin tents in between takes drinking coffee, and I was like, "Oh my god, I'm in heaven." I've never shot in Morocco before. The people were lovely. We shot in this city called Ouzarzate, where I think every desert scene in every movie you're ever seen has been shot. It's a city that has been cultivated around a movie industry. I think you recognize sets from other movies, and there are camels drifting around that have probably been in Lawrence of Arabia, you know. [Laughs]

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