Salmon Fishing in the Yemen Reviews

  • Jun 24, 2020

    Not enough substance or laughs to compensate the paper thin storyline . The chemistry between the two leads was the only plus but they couldnt even make up for this script or lack there of . 2.2

    Not enough substance or laughs to compensate the paper thin storyline . The chemistry between the two leads was the only plus but they couldnt even make up for this script or lack there of . 2.2

  • Jun 03, 2020

    Finding hope through bleak and reserve, good movie

    Finding hope through bleak and reserve, good movie

  • May 22, 2020

    Great story that's far fetched but McGregor acknowledges that right from the beginning which makes it even better. He and Blunt are perfect from start to finish. It's funny and romantic and even a little soulful. Amr Waked is great as the Sheikh with faith and Scott Thomas is wonderful as the despicable political opportunist.

    Great story that's far fetched but McGregor acknowledges that right from the beginning which makes it even better. He and Blunt are perfect from start to finish. It's funny and romantic and even a little soulful. Amr Waked is great as the Sheikh with faith and Scott Thomas is wonderful as the despicable political opportunist.

  • Apr 28, 2020

    Not normally a romcom fan (Godfather, James Cameron / Ridley Scott being more my thing) but I thought this film was bang on. Light, easy going but classy and with a wicked humour edge that had us all laughing through out. Ewan, Emily and especially Kristin were great as was the supporting cast. Pour yourself a glass, sit back and enjoy.

    Not normally a romcom fan (Godfather, James Cameron / Ridley Scott being more my thing) but I thought this film was bang on. Light, easy going but classy and with a wicked humour edge that had us all laughing through out. Ewan, Emily and especially Kristin were great as was the supporting cast. Pour yourself a glass, sit back and enjoy.

  • Apr 10, 2019

    An endearing romance with a delightfully strange premise. Lasse Hallstrom's Salmon Fishing in the Yemen (2011) is a sweet romantic comedy. Ewan McGregor and Emily Blunt are very funny and sweet together. Their chemistry and the hilarious dialogue makes this a fun lighthearted film. Hallstrom's direction is straightforward with a penchant for some beautiful shots and scenery. The scene when Ewan McGregor cuts his hand on the lure he named for Emily Blunt's character from gripping it too hard is an example one a great visual metaphor from Hallstrom. Hallstrom makes Salmon Fishing in the Yemen a light breeze of a movie to watch whenever you feel down for a quick pick me up. I do feel that the plot points for the Afghanistan War are clunky and awkwardly placed in here as a misguided attempt at a moral parable. I think this movie would have been just fine without the political commentary as the social commentary on emotional connections in relationships is enough of a reason for this story. The Middle Eastern dissent felt hackneyed and contrived. The rest of the romantic comedy elements are great however! Ewan McGregor is fantastic as a fussy Scottish government worker and fishing advocate roped into an assignment he does want, while he also plays the dissatisfied husband and goofy new love interest well. McGregor ups his Scottish accent perfectly for even more humor and endlessly adds in funny quips to entertain the viewer. Emily Blunt is excellent as a steadfast assistant to a ludicrously wealthy sheikh. Her stern, but fun loving character is immediately likable. Her desire for a nice and present man will resonate with audience members, while her devotion to a man she's only known for 3 weeks will confound others. I like Blunt, especially how she foils McGregor's prudish and awkward lead with an open and warm manner. She's very sweet and endearing in Salmon Fishing in the Yemen. The entire premise of transporting salmon for a rich sheikh to fish as his private river is funny enough. When put together with strange and unique characters, you have a nice little indie film that is thoroughly entertaining. Kristin Scott Thomas is hilarious as the commanding press chief to the Prime Minister of England. Her yelling and authoritative presence is humorous and her little eye rolls and sly remarks are equally joy inducing. I like Conleth Hill as McGregor's overlord boss and immediate superior with a superiority complex. He is hilarious next to McGregor and was a great casting choice. Likewise, Rachel Stirling is outstanding as McGregor's dissatisfied wife. All her subtle choices display a clear sadness and unhappiness with her marriage. She is sublime opposite McGregor. Overall, this is a short and sweet romantic comedy like fans of this genre dream of I'm sure. If you can ignore the melodramatic serious portions, the rest of the movie is a riotous treat.

    An endearing romance with a delightfully strange premise. Lasse Hallstrom's Salmon Fishing in the Yemen (2011) is a sweet romantic comedy. Ewan McGregor and Emily Blunt are very funny and sweet together. Their chemistry and the hilarious dialogue makes this a fun lighthearted film. Hallstrom's direction is straightforward with a penchant for some beautiful shots and scenery. The scene when Ewan McGregor cuts his hand on the lure he named for Emily Blunt's character from gripping it too hard is an example one a great visual metaphor from Hallstrom. Hallstrom makes Salmon Fishing in the Yemen a light breeze of a movie to watch whenever you feel down for a quick pick me up. I do feel that the plot points for the Afghanistan War are clunky and awkwardly placed in here as a misguided attempt at a moral parable. I think this movie would have been just fine without the political commentary as the social commentary on emotional connections in relationships is enough of a reason for this story. The Middle Eastern dissent felt hackneyed and contrived. The rest of the romantic comedy elements are great however! Ewan McGregor is fantastic as a fussy Scottish government worker and fishing advocate roped into an assignment he does want, while he also plays the dissatisfied husband and goofy new love interest well. McGregor ups his Scottish accent perfectly for even more humor and endlessly adds in funny quips to entertain the viewer. Emily Blunt is excellent as a steadfast assistant to a ludicrously wealthy sheikh. Her stern, but fun loving character is immediately likable. Her desire for a nice and present man will resonate with audience members, while her devotion to a man she's only known for 3 weeks will confound others. I like Blunt, especially how she foils McGregor's prudish and awkward lead with an open and warm manner. She's very sweet and endearing in Salmon Fishing in the Yemen. The entire premise of transporting salmon for a rich sheikh to fish as his private river is funny enough. When put together with strange and unique characters, you have a nice little indie film that is thoroughly entertaining. Kristin Scott Thomas is hilarious as the commanding press chief to the Prime Minister of England. Her yelling and authoritative presence is humorous and her little eye rolls and sly remarks are equally joy inducing. I like Conleth Hill as McGregor's overlord boss and immediate superior with a superiority complex. He is hilarious next to McGregor and was a great casting choice. Likewise, Rachel Stirling is outstanding as McGregor's dissatisfied wife. All her subtle choices display a clear sadness and unhappiness with her marriage. She is sublime opposite McGregor. Overall, this is a short and sweet romantic comedy like fans of this genre dream of I'm sure. If you can ignore the melodramatic serious portions, the rest of the movie is a riotous treat.

  • Mar 23, 2019

    Genuinely quirky on its presentation and match-up topics that may not fully captivate interest for connected engagement that is only majorly relies on the well-casted main pair's charismatic chemistry. (B) (Full review TBD)

    Genuinely quirky on its presentation and match-up topics that may not fully captivate interest for connected engagement that is only majorly relies on the well-casted main pair's charismatic chemistry. (B) (Full review TBD)

  • Aug 24, 2018

    I would rate 0 stars if I could

    I would rate 0 stars if I could

  • Jun 18, 2018

    Salmon Fishing in the Yemen is, on the surface, the story of bringing a visionary idea of a rich sheik, an avid salmon fisherman, to life via Investment Consultant, Harriet Chetwode-Talbot, played by Emily Blunt. That idea is to replicate the cold Northern European fishing environment in the dammed, desert conditions in the Yemen. While initially brushed off as lunacy by British proper, the opportunistic Kristin Scott-Thomas, the Prime Minister's Press Secretary Patricia Maxwell, uses the Anglo-Yemeni venture as a way to "wag the dog" in order to keep the British public away from the reality of the Afghan War. Enter Ewan McGregor's Dr. Alfred Jones, a British Fisheries expert whose natural tendency to maintain current thinking and ignore such insane ideas, but is forced to adhere to the Prime Minister's directive to make this project happen for PR's sake. The fast pace of the film keeps the British tone and humor very interesting and entertaining for the first half until all involved came to the realization that the project was worth pursuing. The second half of the film was a victim of its own setup as the story rides its elementarily presented symbolism as an almost-forced chemistry between Dr. Jones and Harriet blossoms into love for the sake of supporting the theme of the story. Dr. Jones (even his name is generic) is a status quo man with the comfortable life, generic marriage, boring sex life, cloudy communication, yet is working toward a good pension and a drama-free existence, reflected symbolically in the Koi pond in his back yard. Fat and happy fish content to live in their small pond never needing adventure or challenges as they have their comfortable owners to feed them generic white bread every day. Meanwhile, the challenge of the sheik's vision is equally reflected in the behavior of the very salmon he wants to bring to the Yemen. Challenging, full of hard work, demanding, seemingly impossible at times and, if successful, immensely rewarding. For the second half of the film, the viewer watches Dr. Jones fight his own instincts to be Koi-like, choosing to resign from his comfortable British job, fall in love with Harriet and discover his passion for making this visionary idea happen. His transformation mirrors the very project he leads, meant to impart that to achieve what brings us passion takes stepping out of our comfort zone, perhaps even doing and being more than we had ever been. Not everyone will understand, some may criticize, try to bring you down, etc., but passions, loves of such heights may not be understood by the everyday "Koi" in the world as they are content to do the safe things, the easy things, devoid of risk taking for their own passions and loves. In the end, Dr. Jones and Harriet choose to keep pursuing the road less traveled as their rewards are bringing the sheik's vision to life while following their hearts with each other. While the romantic chemistry seemed quick and, at times, a little unnatural, the story pointed to a somewhat depressing truth, even if the end was a happy one. The reality is, some people simply don't take chances, don't follow their hearts and choose the comfortable road in order to avoid the potential difficulties pursuing their loves. I couldn't help but personally relate to the film in this respect as I try every day to follow my heart, my dreams and take chances as often as possible. While not always successful, and as much hurt or pain those failures may cause me, I feel stronger in the end knowing my love, my heart and my passion were worth more than the risks. Sadly, I know those who do the opposite, choose the safe route and never pursue their hearts. As the sheik reiterated throughout Salmon Fishing in the Yemen, the strength and confidence in such seemingly impossible pursuits is our never-ending faith that they are worth it and can happen.

    Salmon Fishing in the Yemen is, on the surface, the story of bringing a visionary idea of a rich sheik, an avid salmon fisherman, to life via Investment Consultant, Harriet Chetwode-Talbot, played by Emily Blunt. That idea is to replicate the cold Northern European fishing environment in the dammed, desert conditions in the Yemen. While initially brushed off as lunacy by British proper, the opportunistic Kristin Scott-Thomas, the Prime Minister's Press Secretary Patricia Maxwell, uses the Anglo-Yemeni venture as a way to "wag the dog" in order to keep the British public away from the reality of the Afghan War. Enter Ewan McGregor's Dr. Alfred Jones, a British Fisheries expert whose natural tendency to maintain current thinking and ignore such insane ideas, but is forced to adhere to the Prime Minister's directive to make this project happen for PR's sake. The fast pace of the film keeps the British tone and humor very interesting and entertaining for the first half until all involved came to the realization that the project was worth pursuing. The second half of the film was a victim of its own setup as the story rides its elementarily presented symbolism as an almost-forced chemistry between Dr. Jones and Harriet blossoms into love for the sake of supporting the theme of the story. Dr. Jones (even his name is generic) is a status quo man with the comfortable life, generic marriage, boring sex life, cloudy communication, yet is working toward a good pension and a drama-free existence, reflected symbolically in the Koi pond in his back yard. Fat and happy fish content to live in their small pond never needing adventure or challenges as they have their comfortable owners to feed them generic white bread every day. Meanwhile, the challenge of the sheik's vision is equally reflected in the behavior of the very salmon he wants to bring to the Yemen. Challenging, full of hard work, demanding, seemingly impossible at times and, if successful, immensely rewarding. For the second half of the film, the viewer watches Dr. Jones fight his own instincts to be Koi-like, choosing to resign from his comfortable British job, fall in love with Harriet and discover his passion for making this visionary idea happen. His transformation mirrors the very project he leads, meant to impart that to achieve what brings us passion takes stepping out of our comfort zone, perhaps even doing and being more than we had ever been. Not everyone will understand, some may criticize, try to bring you down, etc., but passions, loves of such heights may not be understood by the everyday "Koi" in the world as they are content to do the safe things, the easy things, devoid of risk taking for their own passions and loves. In the end, Dr. Jones and Harriet choose to keep pursuing the road less traveled as their rewards are bringing the sheik's vision to life while following their hearts with each other. While the romantic chemistry seemed quick and, at times, a little unnatural, the story pointed to a somewhat depressing truth, even if the end was a happy one. The reality is, some people simply don't take chances, don't follow their hearts and choose the comfortable road in order to avoid the potential difficulties pursuing their loves. I couldn't help but personally relate to the film in this respect as I try every day to follow my heart, my dreams and take chances as often as possible. While not always successful, and as much hurt or pain those failures may cause me, I feel stronger in the end knowing my love, my heart and my passion were worth more than the risks. Sadly, I know those who do the opposite, choose the safe route and never pursue their hearts. As the sheik reiterated throughout Salmon Fishing in the Yemen, the strength and confidence in such seemingly impossible pursuits is our never-ending faith that they are worth it and can happen.

  • May 15, 2018

    Disappointed when I saw the movie, it was never as good as the novel, and they had no idea how Yemen should be depicted.

    Disappointed when I saw the movie, it was never as good as the novel, and they had no idea how Yemen should be depicted.

  • Apr 17, 2018

    The scenery is gorgeous and serene, and the story has a lovely pace to it. I miss seeing these kinds of movies. What a fabulous movie! I hadn't heard much about it, so it was a nice surprise!

    The scenery is gorgeous and serene, and the story has a lovely pace to it. I miss seeing these kinds of movies. What a fabulous movie! I hadn't heard much about it, so it was a nice surprise!