Season of the Witch - Movie Reviews - Rotten Tomatoes

Season of the Witch Reviews

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½ September 21, 2015
Probably my least favourite Romero film. I get what he was trying to do with the opressed housewife and abusive husband plot (with the wife fighting back), but the plot is disjointed and the acting pretty bad, a good last section though.
½ February 23, 2014
George Romero returns slightly to the horror genre after his failure of a romantic film ("There's Always Vanilla", which I have not seen). I say slightly because this deals with witchcraft, but it isn't really all that scary, its just kind of odd and 70s. The people are all wearing awful looking 70s clothes and have awful 70s make-up and haircuts. It's really about suburban housewives getting frustrated with their lives and getting interested in witchcraft, it is only mildly interesting in the end. The acting is pretty bad.
½ January 20, 2014
I was hoping for some sort of horror film, but instead this one is more of a counter-culture portrait from the mid-'70s, so this sort of felt more like a Something Weird Video title than I was expecting it to.

Rental?
April 25, 2013
George Romero's post Night and pre Dawn tale of a housewife's descent into witchcraft is entertaining and benefits from decent cinematography. It gets a little heavy handed with some of the dialogue but has that aura of a dream like state in some of the scenes that I am fond of.
October 23, 2012
"Season of the Witch" is not as you might suspect a horror film, it actually leans more towards a drama and psychological thriller type of story and to really enjoy the movie it's important to know this from the get-to. The film is also unusual at times, with weird, trippy dream sequences that will likely only make sense on a second viewing but once you get invested in the story, it's an enjoyable watch. The film convincingly portrays the frustration of a woman in the 70's that wants to be empowered and take the reins on her sexuality but can't until she finds a way to give herself the power to change her world. The film realistically portrays modern witches (no pointy hats or flying brooms here) and in that way it is interesting to see a realistic film from Romero. It does have a few problems with editing and sounds but the acting is adequate and it's an interesting story that is sure to spark some discussions with your friends once the film is over. (VHS, October 19, 2012)
September 7, 2012
Not traditional horror, but definitely Romero horror (albeit a bit dated it is still a snapshot of the times). It's not as in your face as NOTLD, more subtle and carrying a variation of the themes of class, race, and consumerism. This strikes me as being more about the levels of collateral damage of the "machine". The father/husbands pursuit of success alienates his wife, which starts the second cycle of damage. The success also alienates the daughter, plenty of material things, but lack of cohesive family structure and another cycle of damage begins. Not his best, but still a great film and like all Romero stories will leave you thinking.
July 31, 2012
An oddity from Romero's early career. Despite the title and black magic/witchcraft subplot; more a portrait of an unfulfilled middle aged married woman with gossipy friends. Heavy on dream sequences, hallucinations and psychoanalysis. Pretty much a waste but necessary for Romero completists.
July 10, 2012
Romero's character study/drama with some horror trappings dealing with a put-upon housewife in the early 70's who finds an escape through the occult. While the acting, sound, and film quality can all be a bit rough at times, the film is still worth a peak as a time capsule.
August 31, 2011
Best thing about this movie is the theme song.
August 8, 2011
I won't be watching this one,
Super Reviewer
May 13, 2011
George a romero from the early 70s, looks cheap as hell, but it comes off pretty good, and entertaining. jan white playing a bored housewife, with fantasys of her crappy life as she sees it. she also has visions of what could be in herself. its when her friends introduce her to possibilities of witchcraft, she feels this could be her place in life, this indeed could be a origin story of this womans journey. not gory but phycological to a great deal, and everything pulls together. jan white is great to watch and she holds her own, while others faulter. its overall a entertaining film in romero who people tend to think of in terms of the living dead.
January 9, 2011
After the failed attempt to branch himself outside the horror genre with the romantic dramedy "There's Always Vanilla", director George A. Romero decided to return to the genre that made him famous with "Night of the Living Dead". Still this isn't a full blown horror film as the title "Season of the Witch" would suggest (that's just one of three titles this picture is known by). It's more like an artistic horror film along the lines of Romero's later and MUCH better "Martin" but "Season of the Witch" misses the mark making it a step back on the right track for Romero but another failure that quickly fell out of the public eye and into oblivion.

Filmed as "Jack's Wife" (and briefly released with that title), Romero opts to open the film with a surreal dream sequence. We are then introduced to Joan Mitchell, a bored housewife whose successful husband is never home due to being an workaholic and her daughter is grown and moved out the house. One of her friends introduces her to the world of witchcraft so she decides to become sexually liberated with a young college professor and begins to smoke pot and dabble in the occult.

The problem with "Season of the Witch" is that it's so damn slow moving and talky. It's mostly made of groups of women sitting around, talking witchcraft, occasionally smoking pot, and talking some more. It attempts to focus in on the dark repressed desires of a suburban housewife but just comes off as an extremely dull, pretentious drama with only vague horror undertones. I found myself board almost as much as the character was in the film.

Romero breaks up the tedium with surrealist dream sequences where Joan is stalked by a devil masked killer. These scenes are well shot and suspenseful and are the only really memorable aspect about the picture. The first home video release of this film retitled it "Season of the Witch" and used a still frame of this devil-masked stalker to adorn the cover artwork to make people believed this was a balls out horror film audiences had come to expect from Romero. It was deceptive but at the same time a clever title change and marketing scheme as it worked on me. The title, cover artwork and the tagline "from the director of Night of the Living Dead" and "Dawn of the Dead" suckered me right in. Romero directing a film about witchcraft? Sign me up! You can imagine my disappointment when I got a dull drab film about womens liberation from being measly housewives.

"Season of the Witch" just comes out confused as it not entirely a horror film yet it's not entirely a drama or whatever other genre you want to put it in. The plot won't really appeal to horror fanatics or really anyone else for that matter. Distributors of the film were also dumbfounded on how to market it and they retitled it "Hungry Wives" for a majority of its theatrical release and gave it suggestive poster artwork to fool audiences into thinking this was a soft-core porn flick. Soft core fans would have been even more disappointed than horror fans!

This is definitely a step in the right direction for Romero as it is a return of his stylistic approach (sorely lacking in "There's Always Vanilla") and the subject matter has his trademark hidden meanings, it's just a damn shame it's such a borefest. The film is definitely one of Romero's least known films (though the title makes some people think the new film starring craptacular Nicolas Cage is a remake of this, which it isn't) and deservably so. "Season of the Witch", though shows signs of Romero getting back on track, still ends up being another failed project that will only appeal to Romero worshipers. The DVD release from Anchor Bay Entertainment packaged the film with Romero's other 'lost' film "There's Always Vanilla" for those of you who have to see ALL of this cult director's films, even the poor ones.
½ January 7, 2011
The basic idea of the film is interesting, suburban inertia and sexual repression....but the film dragged along and a lot of the acting was overplayed. I would like to see a remake of this film filtered through Guy Madden with a soundtrack composed of theremins, mellotron, and cats mating.
There is more to the idea of this film then witchcraft. witchcraft is just the Pandora's box that leads to a turn into darker, suppressed pins and needles.
October 10, 2010
When it comes to Romero films, this is supposedly the only one of his films that he has said that he would like to remake. That being said, that says a lot about the film, as there are some really cool, interesting and totally Romero-esque moments in the film but much of the film definitely reflects this knowledge that he would like to remake it. The pacing is quite bad at times, and frequently, you may ask yourself "where is this film going?"and won't seem very focused at times. However, the ending is pretty awesome, cool and surprisingly feministic.
September 3, 2010
I adore George A. Romero, so I really wanted to like this film, but unfortunately it plays a bad, boring, and overly pretentious episode of Desperate Housewives. Romero's attempt to experiment with style comes off the worst kind of wannabe artistry, the acting is stiff and less compelling than some pornography films, and the plot lacks action. Nothing interesting happens in the film, and its attempt to delve into the dark, repressed depths of suburban housewife psychology ends up being as cliched as the stories on the cover of Cosmo every month. I admire Season of the Witch's attempts to be surrealistic and to evoke dreamstates, but I find that even these moments come off as turgid and unconvincing.
August 14, 2010
I adore George A. Romero, so I really wanted to like this film, but unfortunately it plays a bad, boring, and overly pretentious episode of Desperate Housewives. Romero's attempt to experiment with style comes off the worst kind of wannabe artistry, the acting is stiff and less compelling than some pornography films, and the plot lacks action. Nothing interesting happens in the film, and its attempt to delve into the dark, repressed depths of suburban housewife psychology ends up being as cliched as the stories on the cover of Cosmo every month. I admire Season of the Witch's attempts to be surrealistic and to evoke dreamstates, but I find that even these moments come off as turgid and unconvincing.
½ December 17, 2007
George Romero fans would certainly not appreciate this film, as it is not considered traditional horror.
Basically, this film is about a housewife the 1970s, whose life is passing by her. She finds independence through practicing witchcraft.
This is an important feminist film with powerful symbolism.
One of the most important parts of the film is actually in the opening credits.
The main character is following her husband around, serving him tea, while he reads the paper.
This segment of the film is very powerful, surreal, and thought provoking.
It is a huge statement of what is was to be a housewife during that era.
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