Shanghai Noon Reviews

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January 29, 2003
October 15, 2002
If only a little of the resources had been spent on a good script, Shanghai Noon might have been the great Jackie Chan movie his fans have been waiting for.
September 10, 2002
First time director Tom Dey's movie looks pretty good is relatively well put together, but storywise, it just wanders aimlessly through various Western clichs.
June 18, 2002
This is not the laugh riot that you might expect. Same goes for the fighting. There's certainly a lot less here than in the average Jackie Chan movie.
March 24, 2002
Chan is saddled with the languorous, droll wit of Owen Wilson and the result is tedious.
March 22, 2002
March 19, 2001
Even at under two hours, Shanghai Noon feels lengthier than a double bill of The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly and Once Upon a Time in the West.
May 26, 2000
January 1, 2000
Far too much time passes between good punches and punch lines.
January 1, 2000
It's dumb as a board but often funny -- as long as you keep your brain in the car and get in touch with your inner 14-year-old.
January 1, 2000
It's not especially good, but not bad, either.
January 1, 2000
The movie isn't completely unlikeable, but it's not for Chan connoisseurs.
January 1, 2000
So awful I ate like a human Iguanadon just to keep from yelling profanities at the screen.
January 1, 2000
Ultimately dragged on for too long.
January 1, 2000
The typical machinations of an event movie dictate multiple overblown climaxes that leave one less than bowled over.
January 1, 2000
The plots for most Chan movies are glorified coat hangers on which to drape elaborate fights and sight gags. Shanghai Noon is slightly more sophisticated, but it still treats plot twists and peripheral characters as impositions.
January 1, 2000
An uneasy mix of post-modern, self-referential archness and spaghetti Western bravado that's not likely to please anybody.
January 1, 2000
A middling Old West oater that falls flat at least as often as it finds the funny bone.
January 1, 2000
Soon degenerates into a formula, dum-dum buddy picture that strains the talents of its ingratiating cast, as well as the audience's patience.
January 1, 2000
Shanghai Noon, which lacks Rush Hour's manic energy, also lacks confidence in its own much bigger, potentially fascinating story.
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