Sherlock Holmes and the Woman in Green - Movie Reviews - Rotten Tomatoes

Sherlock Holmes and the Woman in Green Reviews

Page 1 of 4
January 3, 2017
Good, but not quite great.
January 1, 2017
good murder mystery film
½ September 21, 2016
Sherlock Holmes (Basil Rathbone) and Dr. Watson (Nigel Bruce) tangle with Professor Moriarty who was previously thought dead in Montevideo (although Holmes suspected otherwise). Now, he has masterminded a blackmail scheme that tricks wealthy men into thinking they have murdered young women and cut off their pinky finger (finding this in their pocket the next day). How is this done? Through hypnotism, my friend, which (of course) Watson has total disdain for, resulting in one of those scenes where Bruce can play the total buffoon (while hypnotized). Fortunately, the blackmailed men aren't doing the actual killing - they just think they have. Holmes figures out that the hypnotist is a beautiful woman (in green) and the finale involves her believing she has triumphed over Holmes by giving him cannabis japonica and forcing him out onto a dangerous ledge - but fortunately he quickly substitutes another drug and is only pretending. That wily Holmes! And now perhaps Moriarty really is dead (!?!). A solid entry in the long-running series, although not its peak.
½ August 7, 2016
A superior entry in the series

In The Woman in Green, London is being terrorized by a series of murders of young women which have only one thing in common: each victim's index finger is neatly cut off. Scotland Yard, as usual, is baffled, and, as usual, turns in desperation to Sherlock Holmes.

Though a rather late entry in a series which many feel lapsed in quality through time, The Woman in Green is actually one of the better movies in the Rathbone/Bruce Sherlock Holmes series. Though Holmes's usual police liaison Lestrade is here replaced by the slightly less bumbling Gregson, all of the other expected elements are firmly in place. As with most of the series (except for the initial two, The Hound of the Baskervilles and The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes), this film is set in a sort of combination dream period which is half Victorian and half mid-20th century. The flat at 221B Baker Street is particularly atmospheric and Victorian, perhaps in deliberate contrast to the chic modern flat of femme fatale Lydia Marlowe (Hilary Brooke,) where much of the action takes place.

Several things make this film stand out in the series. The puzzle of the murders connected only by a gruesome detail, while so far as I can remember not drawn from any actual Holmes story, has a genuinely Holmesian feel. Bruce's Watson is particularly endearing in his fumbling assistance, and though this is not one of Rathbone's best portrayals of Holmes -- one gets the feeling he's starting to go through the motions this late in the game -- his characterization benefits greatly by for once having a really effective feminine foil: Hilary Brooke as the evil, sophisticated blonde mesmerist proves a credible enemy. Henry Daniell is also very good as a particularly reptilian Moriarty.

The photography is also noteworthy here. The spookiness of the film's theme of hypnotism is reflected in dark lighting and tilted camera angles which almost make The Woman in Green into an expressionist noir film.

In a nutshell: if you like this series, you are sure to enjoy this film for its combination of elements which you expect in this series with surprising and effective innovations. I saw it as part of the MPI box The complete Sherlock Holmes collection, which is presumably the same as the version on the single disc; the transfer was good.
½ November 27, 2013
Even the return of Moriarty can't lift this Sherlock Holmes into the above average status. It has some good moments but has been hideously overrated on RT. Nowhere near as strong as the earlier films.
½ August 6, 2012
Holmes Versus Moriarty, Round Three--Strange Crimes & Worthy Adversaries For Holmes!!
July 29, 2012
A perfectly appropriate installment in the magnificent good-old series about the world's most famous detective. Basil Rathbone shines on screen, while Nigel Bruce gives the whole story a decent comedic touch. Someone is ruthlessly killing women and dismembering their fingers. The whole purpose of those actions need to be deduced, and quickly, by no one other than Mr. Holes. Strong case, many twists and engaging storyline make this a very satisfying entry in the franchise. And Henry Daniell makes a devilish professor Moriarty, Holmes' most deceptive enemy of them all.
½ July 21, 2012
fun and entertaining
½ April 17, 2012
Interesting and suspenseful film, but falls apart near the end.
March 31, 2012
I love the Sherlock Holmes films with Basil Rathbone and Nigel Bruce quite a bit, but The Woman in Green is a slight step back to me in terms of story quality. For one, the emphasis turns out to be mainly on Moriarty's use of hypnotism, instead of the more intriguing 'modern day Jack the Ripper' plot thread that turns out to be a red herring of sorts. I'm not saying that Moriarty shouldn't have been involved with the story, but this one feels a little bit forced, and doesn't seem to flow as well as some of the others. It's still enjoyable, but not quite fulfilling enough.
FilmFanatik
Super Reviewer
December 15, 2011
I love the Sherlock Holmes films with Basil Rathbone and Nigel Bruce quite a bit, but The Woman in Green is a slight step back to me in terms of story quality. For one, the emphasis turns out to be mainly on Moriarty's use of hypnotism, instead of the more intriguing 'modern day Jack the Ripper' plot thread that turns out to be a red herring of sorts. I'm not saying that Moriarty shouldn't have been involved with the story, but this one feels a little bit forced, and doesn't seem to flow as well as some of the others. It's still enjoyable, but not quite fulfilling enough.
½ September 5, 2011
SHERLOCK HOLMES AND THE WOMAN IN GREEN (1945)
½ June 19, 2011
n my opinion the most well acted and most interesting Sherlock Holmes movie of them all. Basil Rathbone gives his best performance as Holmes and Bruce is his usual self as Watson who occasionally bumbles his way into brilliance. I also rather liked how it seemed to stay true to the Doyle style writing where it leaves you puzzled but he also makes you draw your own conclusions which are sometimes correct he doesn't make you guess too much but he does leave me hanging at times. I actually found the first half of this film very brilliant particularly the scene where Holmes is playing his violin that fits the scene brilliantly. I rather enjoyed this film, although it isn't as good as the adaptation of The Hounds of Baskervilles it is still a very good film that holds up to the rest of them and will stand as one of the greatest Sherlock Holmes movies ever made.
June 15, 2011
I dug this film. Holmes and Watson are centre-stage throughout and Rathers and Brucey give scintillating performances. It's the added ingredients which lift this film above most of the others in the series - first and foremost the vein of dark humour running through it. In the opening scene we get a vertically-challenged police commissioner (how did that happen?) berating his officers and pointing out the scenes of murders on a map with a pointer longer than he is. Then there are the scenes between Holmes and Moriarty (a performance of supreme campness by series stalwart Henry Daniell) which are notable for their homoerotic overtones. And a sceptical Watson gets hypnotized with embarrassing results. As well as the humour, there is some interesting and at times startlingly beautiful photography. Many of the close-ups are at off-kilter angles and some of the aerial shots are astounding. But most of all I loved the premise of the film - Moriarty and his gang hypnotize people into believing they've committed grisly murders then blackmail them. Paul Cavanagh is brilliant in his cameo role as one of the hypnotees - complete bewilderment is not an easy thing to act convincingly but he does a fine job.
½ June 8, 2011
Arms folded, Scotland Yard turns once again to the wits of Holmes and Watson to solve a series of Jack The Ripper-like mutilation murders; along the way Hillary Brooke pops up as an evil hypnotist and Henry Daniell (who appeared previously as different individuals in The Voice of Terror and Sherlock Holmes in Washington) as the villainous Professor Moriarty. The crime in The Woman in Green jumps all over the place, but I found it to be the most grisly and creepy of this franchise so far. And there is one particularly fiendish old man and his suitcase that is just fantastically sick, sick, sick. VF.
February 11, 2011
Not one of my favourites as still not sure why Moriarty was in this other than for effect rather than bring any substance to the story.
½ December 25, 2010
Less satisfying on second viewing - I'm sorta mystified as to why I held it in such high regard. It might have something to do with Henry Daniell as Moriarty, who plays the role so damn cold. It might have been a definitive Moriarty, if he'd been given any real screentime of note. Even the scene he shares with Rathbone (two Warner villains collide!) is far too brief. Still, a solid enough story, and quite a nifty plot in some ways.
½ October 28, 2010
Classic Basil Rathbone and Nigel Bruce as Sherlock Holmes and Dr. Watson. However, with the added bonus of Henry Daniell, it makes for a right awesome watch when he and Rathbone spar wits.
October 8, 2010
Good old detective flick. Not one of the best Sherlock Holmes movies, though, with very little of the character's famous deductive skills showing, but still enjoyable.
Page 1 of 4