Sherlock Holmes and the Woman in Green Reviews

  • Oct 08, 2020

    Another quality entry in the Sherlock Holmes repertoire with Rathbone and Bruce. Always better when Professor Moriarity is involved.

    Another quality entry in the Sherlock Holmes repertoire with Rathbone and Bruce. Always better when Professor Moriarity is involved.

  • Oct 21, 2018

    Enjoyable if rather perfunctory Sherlock Holmes film. Unlike the stories and films based on Conan Doyles originals, there is no real mystery here as to who is doing the murders (a gang led by Moriarty and a lovely female mesmeric) or how Holmes is going to crack the case. Yet, not bad for 60+ minutes. Much enhanced by the lovely Hillary Brooke.

    Enjoyable if rather perfunctory Sherlock Holmes film. Unlike the stories and films based on Conan Doyles originals, there is no real mystery here as to who is doing the murders (a gang led by Moriarty and a lovely female mesmeric) or how Holmes is going to crack the case. Yet, not bad for 60+ minutes. Much enhanced by the lovely Hillary Brooke.

  • Oct 14, 2018

    Wonderful, just wonderful, Mr Morate gets his victims to kill under hypnosis, and then blackmails them, but will Holmes solve the mystery before another girl dies? Another fantastic classic

    Wonderful, just wonderful, Mr Morate gets his victims to kill under hypnosis, and then blackmails them, but will Holmes solve the mystery before another girl dies? Another fantastic classic

  • Aug 04, 2018

    A better installment in this Sherlock Holmes series than most. Basil Rathbone is clever and charismatic as usual in portraying Sherlock Holmes. He plays it cool and charming, while genuinely seeming like the smartest man in the room. Nigel Bruce is hilarious as the bumbling, stuffy Dr. Watson. On the other hand, the devious Prof. Moriarty is played by the boisterous Henry Daniell. His cruel demeanor and sly nature is evident in Daniell's brilliant portrayal. This is certainly one of the best versions of Moriarty. Lastly, Hillary Brooke is sultry and distracting as Lydia Marlow. She pulls off being the femme fatale with a more sinister twist quite well. Brooke is a nice foil for Holmes and is mesmerizing whenever she is present on screen. In all, Sherlock Holmes and the Woman in Green is a very fun and mysterious movie. One of the finest in Rathbone and Bruce's series, this film takes unusual circumstances with fascinating angles. The neat cinematography melds well with the curious subject matter.

    A better installment in this Sherlock Holmes series than most. Basil Rathbone is clever and charismatic as usual in portraying Sherlock Holmes. He plays it cool and charming, while genuinely seeming like the smartest man in the room. Nigel Bruce is hilarious as the bumbling, stuffy Dr. Watson. On the other hand, the devious Prof. Moriarty is played by the boisterous Henry Daniell. His cruel demeanor and sly nature is evident in Daniell's brilliant portrayal. This is certainly one of the best versions of Moriarty. Lastly, Hillary Brooke is sultry and distracting as Lydia Marlow. She pulls off being the femme fatale with a more sinister twist quite well. Brooke is a nice foil for Holmes and is mesmerizing whenever she is present on screen. In all, Sherlock Holmes and the Woman in Green is a very fun and mysterious movie. One of the finest in Rathbone and Bruce's series, this film takes unusual circumstances with fascinating angles. The neat cinematography melds well with the curious subject matter.

  • Jan 03, 2017

    Good, but not quite great.

    Good, but not quite great.

  • Jan 01, 2017

    good murder mystery film

    good murder mystery film

  • Sep 21, 2016

    Sherlock Holmes (Basil Rathbone) and Dr. Watson (Nigel Bruce) tangle with Professor Moriarty who was previously thought dead in Montevideo (although Holmes suspected otherwise). Now, he has masterminded a blackmail scheme that tricks wealthy men into thinking they have murdered young women and cut off their pinky finger (finding this in their pocket the next day). How is this done? Through hypnotism, my friend, which (of course) Watson has total disdain for, resulting in one of those scenes where Bruce can play the total buffoon (while hypnotized). Fortunately, the blackmailed men aren't doing the actual killing - they just think they have. Holmes figures out that the hypnotist is a beautiful woman (in green) and the finale involves her believing she has triumphed over Holmes by giving him cannabis japonica and forcing him out onto a dangerous ledge - but fortunately he quickly substitutes another drug and is only pretending. That wily Holmes! And now perhaps Moriarty really is dead (!?!). A solid entry in the long-running series, although not its peak.

    Sherlock Holmes (Basil Rathbone) and Dr. Watson (Nigel Bruce) tangle with Professor Moriarty who was previously thought dead in Montevideo (although Holmes suspected otherwise). Now, he has masterminded a blackmail scheme that tricks wealthy men into thinking they have murdered young women and cut off their pinky finger (finding this in their pocket the next day). How is this done? Through hypnotism, my friend, which (of course) Watson has total disdain for, resulting in one of those scenes where Bruce can play the total buffoon (while hypnotized). Fortunately, the blackmailed men aren't doing the actual killing - they just think they have. Holmes figures out that the hypnotist is a beautiful woman (in green) and the finale involves her believing she has triumphed over Holmes by giving him cannabis japonica and forcing him out onto a dangerous ledge - but fortunately he quickly substitutes another drug and is only pretending. That wily Holmes! And now perhaps Moriarty really is dead (!?!). A solid entry in the long-running series, although not its peak.

  • Aug 07, 2016

    A superior entry in the series In The Woman in Green, London is being terrorized by a series of murders of young women which have only one thing in common: each victim's index finger is neatly cut off. Scotland Yard, as usual, is baffled, and, as usual, turns in desperation to Sherlock Holmes. Though a rather late entry in a series which many feel lapsed in quality through time, The Woman in Green is actually one of the better movies in the Rathbone/Bruce Sherlock Holmes series. Though Holmes's usual police liaison Lestrade is here replaced by the slightly less bumbling Gregson, all of the other expected elements are firmly in place. As with most of the series (except for the initial two, The Hound of the Baskervilles and The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes), this film is set in a sort of combination dream period which is half Victorian and half mid-20th century. The flat at 221B Baker Street is particularly atmospheric and Victorian, perhaps in deliberate contrast to the chic modern flat of femme fatale Lydia Marlowe (Hilary Brooke,) where much of the action takes place. Several things make this film stand out in the series. The puzzle of the murders connected only by a gruesome detail, while so far as I can remember not drawn from any actual Holmes story, has a genuinely Holmesian feel. Bruce's Watson is particularly endearing in his fumbling assistance, and though this is not one of Rathbone's best portrayals of Holmes -- one gets the feeling he's starting to go through the motions this late in the game -- his characterization benefits greatly by for once having a really effective feminine foil: Hilary Brooke as the evil, sophisticated blonde mesmerist proves a credible enemy. Henry Daniell is also very good as a particularly reptilian Moriarty. The photography is also noteworthy here. The spookiness of the film's theme of hypnotism is reflected in dark lighting and tilted camera angles which almost make The Woman in Green into an expressionist noir film. In a nutshell: if you like this series, you are sure to enjoy this film for its combination of elements which you expect in this series with surprising and effective innovations. I saw it as part of the MPI box The complete Sherlock Holmes collection, which is presumably the same as the version on the single disc; the transfer was good.

    A superior entry in the series In The Woman in Green, London is being terrorized by a series of murders of young women which have only one thing in common: each victim's index finger is neatly cut off. Scotland Yard, as usual, is baffled, and, as usual, turns in desperation to Sherlock Holmes. Though a rather late entry in a series which many feel lapsed in quality through time, The Woman in Green is actually one of the better movies in the Rathbone/Bruce Sherlock Holmes series. Though Holmes's usual police liaison Lestrade is here replaced by the slightly less bumbling Gregson, all of the other expected elements are firmly in place. As with most of the series (except for the initial two, The Hound of the Baskervilles and The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes), this film is set in a sort of combination dream period which is half Victorian and half mid-20th century. The flat at 221B Baker Street is particularly atmospheric and Victorian, perhaps in deliberate contrast to the chic modern flat of femme fatale Lydia Marlowe (Hilary Brooke,) where much of the action takes place. Several things make this film stand out in the series. The puzzle of the murders connected only by a gruesome detail, while so far as I can remember not drawn from any actual Holmes story, has a genuinely Holmesian feel. Bruce's Watson is particularly endearing in his fumbling assistance, and though this is not one of Rathbone's best portrayals of Holmes -- one gets the feeling he's starting to go through the motions this late in the game -- his characterization benefits greatly by for once having a really effective feminine foil: Hilary Brooke as the evil, sophisticated blonde mesmerist proves a credible enemy. Henry Daniell is also very good as a particularly reptilian Moriarty. The photography is also noteworthy here. The spookiness of the film's theme of hypnotism is reflected in dark lighting and tilted camera angles which almost make The Woman in Green into an expressionist noir film. In a nutshell: if you like this series, you are sure to enjoy this film for its combination of elements which you expect in this series with surprising and effective innovations. I saw it as part of the MPI box The complete Sherlock Holmes collection, which is presumably the same as the version on the single disc; the transfer was good.

  • Nov 27, 2013

    Even the return of Moriarty can't lift this Sherlock Holmes into the above average status. It has some good moments but has been hideously overrated on RT. Nowhere near as strong as the earlier films.

    Even the return of Moriarty can't lift this Sherlock Holmes into the above average status. It has some good moments but has been hideously overrated on RT. Nowhere near as strong as the earlier films.

  • Jan 02, 2013

    The woman in green is actually a dull, the plot is straight forward but the direction and the plot itself were just not good enough for you to appreciate it. The movie featured Sherlockâ(TM)s Holmes arch enemy, Professor Moriarty who is suppose to be Holmes intellectual equal, but in this flick he seemed to look more like a struggling villain trying to live out a fantasy of being the man to kill Holmes. The woman in Green is a 1945 American crime drama thriller starring Sir Arthur Conan Doyleâ(TM)s detective Sherlock Holmes, his faithful companion Dr. Watson and Professor Moriarty all this characters were created by Doyle. The movie is the eleventh film to star both Basil Rathbone and Nigel Bruce as Sherlock Holmes and Dr. Watson respectively. The movie is not directly based on any of Sir Arthur Conan Doyleâ(TM)s stories and books on Sherlock Holmes, the movie is credited to have an original screenplay, but several of its scenes can be said to have been lifted from "The Final Problem" and "The Adventure of the Empty House." The movie plot starts with a string of random murders of women who then have their forefingers severed. These acts made Scotland Yard think that there is a serial killer on the loose and Sherlock is called upon for aid. During his investigation he and Watson, stumbled upon a clue after a deceased manâ(TM)s daughter brought them a forefinger believed to be belonging to one of the dead women. Sherlock was able to deduce from the incident that some high power is at play here, not just a mere serial killer. His obsession with the fact Moriarty is not dead made him to conclude that Moriarty is back and is the man behind all the murders. His believe came true when he got a visit from Moriarty himself, and he got another lead in the case when a man was sent to kill him and the man didnâ(TM)t even seem to know what he was doing. Although owning all the Rathbone/Bruce series will be a nice collection for any movie collector, I wonâ(TM)t try and stop you from collecting this movie, but as I said it is a low for me, the high I got when I saw The Hounds of the Baskervilleâ(TM)s (1939) kind of like vanished half way through this one, this post World War II movie, is a little dry for my taste. www.lagsreviews.com

    The woman in green is actually a dull, the plot is straight forward but the direction and the plot itself were just not good enough for you to appreciate it. The movie featured Sherlockâ(TM)s Holmes arch enemy, Professor Moriarty who is suppose to be Holmes intellectual equal, but in this flick he seemed to look more like a struggling villain trying to live out a fantasy of being the man to kill Holmes. The woman in Green is a 1945 American crime drama thriller starring Sir Arthur Conan Doyleâ(TM)s detective Sherlock Holmes, his faithful companion Dr. Watson and Professor Moriarty all this characters were created by Doyle. The movie is the eleventh film to star both Basil Rathbone and Nigel Bruce as Sherlock Holmes and Dr. Watson respectively. The movie is not directly based on any of Sir Arthur Conan Doyleâ(TM)s stories and books on Sherlock Holmes, the movie is credited to have an original screenplay, but several of its scenes can be said to have been lifted from "The Final Problem" and "The Adventure of the Empty House." The movie plot starts with a string of random murders of women who then have their forefingers severed. These acts made Scotland Yard think that there is a serial killer on the loose and Sherlock is called upon for aid. During his investigation he and Watson, stumbled upon a clue after a deceased manâ(TM)s daughter brought them a forefinger believed to be belonging to one of the dead women. Sherlock was able to deduce from the incident that some high power is at play here, not just a mere serial killer. His obsession with the fact Moriarty is not dead made him to conclude that Moriarty is back and is the man behind all the murders. His believe came true when he got a visit from Moriarty himself, and he got another lead in the case when a man was sent to kill him and the man didnâ(TM)t even seem to know what he was doing. Although owning all the Rathbone/Bruce series will be a nice collection for any movie collector, I wonâ(TM)t try and stop you from collecting this movie, but as I said it is a low for me, the high I got when I saw The Hounds of the Baskervilleâ(TM)s (1939) kind of like vanished half way through this one, this post World War II movie, is a little dry for my taste. www.lagsreviews.com