She's All That Reviews

  • May 30, 2019

    Teenage romantic comedies usually suffer from the same problems that adult sex comedies do in that they are not sure how far to push it. Lying and deceit leading to a fulfilling, lasting relationship is a common trope of the genre but this film and 10 Things I Hate About You (1999) were really the zenith in terms of use of this trope. Seeing now faded teen idols Rachel Leigh Cook and Freddie Prinze Jr. headline a movie is still funny while Academy Award winner Anna Paquin lurks in the background as the little sister. I really enjoy the film but I don't think it reaches the heights of Clueless (1995), The Breakfast Club (1985), The Edge of Seventeen (2016) or Pretty in Pink (1986). Zack Siler, Freddie Prinze Jr., is a smart, popular high school senior who faces pressure from his father to study at a certain University and has recently been cheated on by his longtime girlfriend Taylor Vaughn, Trudi Lynn Styler. His best friends bet that he can't make loser Lanie Boggs, Rachel Leigh Cook, popular by the time that the end of year ball rolls around. He pursues her and eventually the two begin to fall in love but their newfound connection is threatened by the bet. We get fairly typical portrayals of the various cliques found in an American high school but one of the stereotypes is subverted as the popular kid, Zack, is intelligent while the dork, Lanie, is artistic but not an academic genius. Each character is also drawn very specifically as Taylor Vaugh gets the perfect popular girl name and her style of speaking is exactly what you would imagine a rich, shallow young woman talking like. Zack's buddies are all bro-y enough to be believable as the sort of men who would propose such a hurtful bet and of course the casting helps. The writers behind this film are not the antecedents of John Hughes but they do a fine job considering the low expectations set up for this movie. There is a creepiness to the plot as we follow the usual of beats of Pygmalion and I do object to her quick acceptance of his betrayal and the fact that she falls over herself to forgive him but the story moves along at a quick enough pace that I didn't have time to truly get upset. The plot is set up well as we get Walker talking us through the ‘bet' while we watch Prinze Jr. look pensive as he stares at Cook in her wire rimmed glasses and overalls. The first romantic encounter between the two at the performance art show was odd but it also allowed me to appreciate that the writers went to some lengths to show that Lanie was artistic and different. All of these interesting little moments charm viewers and prevent us from seeing some of the darker elements of the story that could cause us to be disgusted by Zack's actions. The performances in the film were not fantastic but they were serviceable as the actors aren't given a brilliant script to work with. Styler is wonderful as I have already mentioned as her narration of the flashback in which she meets Brock alone sells her character. Prinze Jr. is stolidly handsome and delivers his lines with enough "aw, shucks!" affectation to keep the audience engaged. Walker is an absolute douche as Prinze Jr.'s best friend and there is still a certain novelty to seeing him in this and Varsity Blues (1999) knowing the poor action star he would become. Nobody in the cast is going to win an Academy Award but they all fill their roles adequately, look pretty enough and deliver their one liners with enough pep to make the film entertaining. I would recommend this film to viewers, especially teenagers, because it's one of the better examples of a classical literary story being adapted into a film for teenagers. This is easily Cook's most iconic role, unless you're a fan of Blow Dry (2001), and Prinze Jr. gives the performance that would forever cement him as a late 1990s teen heartthrob, come for the teen idols and stay for Trudi Lynn Styler.

    Teenage romantic comedies usually suffer from the same problems that adult sex comedies do in that they are not sure how far to push it. Lying and deceit leading to a fulfilling, lasting relationship is a common trope of the genre but this film and 10 Things I Hate About You (1999) were really the zenith in terms of use of this trope. Seeing now faded teen idols Rachel Leigh Cook and Freddie Prinze Jr. headline a movie is still funny while Academy Award winner Anna Paquin lurks in the background as the little sister. I really enjoy the film but I don't think it reaches the heights of Clueless (1995), The Breakfast Club (1985), The Edge of Seventeen (2016) or Pretty in Pink (1986). Zack Siler, Freddie Prinze Jr., is a smart, popular high school senior who faces pressure from his father to study at a certain University and has recently been cheated on by his longtime girlfriend Taylor Vaughn, Trudi Lynn Styler. His best friends bet that he can't make loser Lanie Boggs, Rachel Leigh Cook, popular by the time that the end of year ball rolls around. He pursues her and eventually the two begin to fall in love but their newfound connection is threatened by the bet. We get fairly typical portrayals of the various cliques found in an American high school but one of the stereotypes is subverted as the popular kid, Zack, is intelligent while the dork, Lanie, is artistic but not an academic genius. Each character is also drawn very specifically as Taylor Vaugh gets the perfect popular girl name and her style of speaking is exactly what you would imagine a rich, shallow young woman talking like. Zack's buddies are all bro-y enough to be believable as the sort of men who would propose such a hurtful bet and of course the casting helps. The writers behind this film are not the antecedents of John Hughes but they do a fine job considering the low expectations set up for this movie. There is a creepiness to the plot as we follow the usual of beats of Pygmalion and I do object to her quick acceptance of his betrayal and the fact that she falls over herself to forgive him but the story moves along at a quick enough pace that I didn't have time to truly get upset. The plot is set up well as we get Walker talking us through the ‘bet' while we watch Prinze Jr. look pensive as he stares at Cook in her wire rimmed glasses and overalls. The first romantic encounter between the two at the performance art show was odd but it also allowed me to appreciate that the writers went to some lengths to show that Lanie was artistic and different. All of these interesting little moments charm viewers and prevent us from seeing some of the darker elements of the story that could cause us to be disgusted by Zack's actions. The performances in the film were not fantastic but they were serviceable as the actors aren't given a brilliant script to work with. Styler is wonderful as I have already mentioned as her narration of the flashback in which she meets Brock alone sells her character. Prinze Jr. is stolidly handsome and delivers his lines with enough "aw, shucks!" affectation to keep the audience engaged. Walker is an absolute douche as Prinze Jr.'s best friend and there is still a certain novelty to seeing him in this and Varsity Blues (1999) knowing the poor action star he would become. Nobody in the cast is going to win an Academy Award but they all fill their roles adequately, look pretty enough and deliver their one liners with enough pep to make the film entertaining. I would recommend this film to viewers, especially teenagers, because it's one of the better examples of a classical literary story being adapted into a film for teenagers. This is easily Cook's most iconic role, unless you're a fan of Blow Dry (2001), and Prinze Jr. gives the performance that would forever cement him as a late 1990s teen heartthrob, come for the teen idols and stay for Trudi Lynn Styler.

  • Feb 24, 2019

    Freddie Prinze Jr and Rachael Leigh Cook star in a corny and completely submerged-in-its-own-time chick flick, with all the sins of its time and all the crazy ârad-extravaganzaâ?, combined with cheesy dialogue plagued with the typical clichà (C)s of the genre, nevertheless, there is no denial in the charm and self-awareness this humble teen-romance possess, making it an enjoyably-enough film by Robert Iscove, that may not outstand in its own field, but is good enough for what it is.

    Freddie Prinze Jr and Rachael Leigh Cook star in a corny and completely submerged-in-its-own-time chick flick, with all the sins of its time and all the crazy ârad-extravaganzaâ?, combined with cheesy dialogue plagued with the typical clichà (C)s of the genre, nevertheless, there is no denial in the charm and self-awareness this humble teen-romance possess, making it an enjoyably-enough film by Robert Iscove, that may not outstand in its own field, but is good enough for what it is.

  • Feb 17, 2019

    Rachael Leigh Cook adoringly watching a spiky-gel-haired Freddie Prinze Jr. do hacky sack as public performance art is the textbook definition of the 90s.

    Rachael Leigh Cook adoringly watching a spiky-gel-haired Freddie Prinze Jr. do hacky sack as public performance art is the textbook definition of the 90s.

  • Jan 28, 2019

    Cheesy predictable chick flick... but enjoyable non the less.

    Cheesy predictable chick flick... but enjoyable non the less.

  • Jul 20, 2018

    There are some parts of this movie that make me cringe, but the staircase is the best hands down. The fact that the song "Kiss Me" in the background makes for a great addition.

    There are some parts of this movie that make me cringe, but the staircase is the best hands down. The fact that the song "Kiss Me" in the background makes for a great addition.

  • Apr 28, 2018

    This movie truly gives new meaning to the words cheesy and unoriginal. It uses, or should I say reuses, the most boring, unintelligent plot imaginable while still managing to incorporate the dead mom drama into what can only be described as a rom-com minus the com. Despite all of this however, there is a certain drag-you-in effect, perhaps exposing the masochistic roots in all of us, which gives this movie a distinct place in our world. All and all, stupid, trashy, and relaxing I-need-to-get-away-from-anything-resembling-reality movie.

    This movie truly gives new meaning to the words cheesy and unoriginal. It uses, or should I say reuses, the most boring, unintelligent plot imaginable while still managing to incorporate the dead mom drama into what can only be described as a rom-com minus the com. Despite all of this however, there is a certain drag-you-in effect, perhaps exposing the masochistic roots in all of us, which gives this movie a distinct place in our world. All and all, stupid, trashy, and relaxing I-need-to-get-away-from-anything-resembling-reality movie.

  • Apr 24, 2018

    Very nice playful film that is not all rah rah and moralistic. Our heroïne was actually better looking with the glasses. Beside, it's ridiculous to remove the glasses to someone that needs them. Same with eyebrow plucking. That was not a makeover, but a makeunder. Otherwise, the film is somewhat realistic, nothing over the top, all cute, with the cute song of the year, and amusing all along without being hilarious. Fun, smiles. Great cameo by Sarah Michelle Gellar!! My heart almost stopped.

    Very nice playful film that is not all rah rah and moralistic. Our heroïne was actually better looking with the glasses. Beside, it's ridiculous to remove the glasses to someone that needs them. Same with eyebrow plucking. That was not a makeover, but a makeunder. Otherwise, the film is somewhat realistic, nothing over the top, all cute, with the cute song of the year, and amusing all along without being hilarious. Fun, smiles. Great cameo by Sarah Michelle Gellar!! My heart almost stopped.

  • Feb 11, 2018

    An absolutely classic teen flick. though it follows very familiar trends, it's just a flat out good time.

    An absolutely classic teen flick. though it follows very familiar trends, it's just a flat out good time.

  • Jan 17, 2018

    A guilty pleasure, but She’s All That is fine even if it has every late 90s-early 2000s cliches in these comedy films

    A guilty pleasure, but She’s All That is fine even if it has every late 90s-early 2000s cliches in these comedy films

  • Dec 13, 2017

    Still a great movie.

    Still a great movie.