Slogan (1970) - Rotten Tomatoes

Slogan (1970)

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AUDIENCE SCORE

Critic Consensus: No consensus yet.

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Movie Info

A successful ad man engages in illicit affairs in this romantic comedy satire. Serge (Serge Gainsbourg) is an annual winner at the advertising awards festival held annually in Venice. When he meets the pretty British woman Evelyne (Jane Birkin), he sets her up in an apartment and plans to leave his pregnant wife. The newfound love of the immensely shallow couple is shattered when Evelyne runs off to marry a speedboat racer. Serge continues working for the advertising firm and continues his search for love affairs without commitment ~ Dan Pavlides, Rovi

Cast

Jane Birkin
as Evelyne
Juliet Berto
as Secretary
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Critic Reviews for Slogan

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Audience Reviews for Slogan

½

I mean, what's the point of this movie if not to just look at the chemistry between Jane Birkin and Serge Gainsbourg? This film is where they met, and the spark is intense- not just for them but for the audience towards them. The film itself is silly if not bizarre-- an older married man falls for an 18 year old girl (who essentially has the mind of a 10 year old girl in a lot of ways)... it's certainly 'of its time' in a lot of respects, though I have to say nobody really leaves this film unscathed. It's fairly damning of its protagonist Serge, showing him as sleazy and short sighted in his choices of women. While it's wince-inducing to watch the scenes of her screaming and crying in his face, I wondered if it's almost counter-intuitively powerful to show her like this; she proves to be too untamable for Serge's fantasy of her and in the end leaves him because of his inability to treat her like an equal (or perhaps a human). However, the movie really shines in its sense of humor, music and craziness more than anything else. There's some genuine laugh out loud moments ("Hello, this is my homewrecker. Oh by the way, that was my mother") that I didn't expect from a film like this. There's also some cringe-worthy moments (specifically him hitting her, though you can't say it was unrealistic). But for the most part, a really fun and ridiculous film with a perfect cast.

Jenna Ipcar
Jenna Ipcar

Your reaction to "Slogan" will entirely depend on your degree of fascination with Serge Gainsbourg and Jane Birkin. There's really no other reason to see the film. Even a fondness for '60s French cinema hardly matters. It's fitting that Serge's character, Serge Faberge, shoots TV commercials. Because the whole movie is produced in that style. Daytime lighting, glamorous locations, romantic closeups and rapid cuts. And lots of fine dining. All that's missing is the perfume bottle. Faberge is an award-winning writer/director in the advertising racket, currently heading a campaign for a macho aftershave called Scar. He's comfortably married, but one woman is never enough for these charismatic European scoundrels. And once he glimpses skinny Evelyne (Birkin) in an elevator, he's hooked. He and his jaded wife edge toward divorce, while Evelyne's outgoing lover grumbles. Elsewhere, Evelyne's attentions also stray to a carefree hunk with a speedboat (a daredevil boat run through Venetian canals is the film's most entertaining scene). That's essentially the plot. Juliet Berto ("Celine and Julie Go Boating," multiple Jean-Luc Godard films) is wasted in a bit part as Serge's assistant, finding herself the victim of his mysterious talent for making things disappear with a finger snap. Serge vainly worries about growing too old for the young lasses, while Evelyne is prone to explosive crying fits that sometimes make sense and always stretch Birkin's weak dramatic skills. (Gainsbourg fares a little better as an actor, unsurprising since his public persona was generally such a contrivance.) Birkin was obviously cast for her beauty, since she had little film experience and didn't even speak French. But meeting her co-star led to a subsequent 11-year marriage. Naturally, Gainsbourg also composed the soundtrack, which mostly consists of frisky percussion grooves and varying instrumental takes on "La Chanson de Slogan" (eventually sung by him and Birkin over the closing credits). But what was the point of that car accident, beyond flaunting the makeup department's inability to create convincing bloody bandages?

Eric Broome
Eric Broome

Super Reviewer

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