Son of Samson Reviews

  • Apr 27, 2018

    “Goliath and the Barbarians” director Carlo Campogalliani’s “Son of Samson” ranks as an above-average peplum about palace intrigue in 11th century BC Egypt, with beefy Mark Forest as Maciste flexing his oily pectorals and biceps in several displays of monumental strength as he topples a tyrant and sets enslaved men and women free. Our hero’s hand-to-hand combat scenes with a lion and a crocodile are far from convincing. Mind you, the fight with the lion tops the ephemeral water struggle with an ersatz looking crocodile. Nevertheless, the exotic setting of Egypt with its historic pyramids, our hero’s brawls with the Queen’s army, a stone cell that nearly crushes him, the obelisk erection scene, a supernatural necklace, and a minor surprise or two make this sword and sandal saga a better-than-average entry. Campogalliani and scenarists Oreste Biancoli of "Atlas Against the Cyclops" and Ennio De Concini of Romulus and Remus don’t deviate from the usual formula. The Queen is treacherous beyond comparison and she tries to enchant our brawny champion. Of course, everybody here including Brooklyn born Lou Degni has been dubbed but that’s part of the charm of these Italian produced spectacles. Surprisingly, the violence appear rather graphic with weapons piercing bodies and bright red blood splashed across the bodies. "Hercules vs. the Hydra” composer Carlo Innocenzi contributes an atmospheric orchestral soundtrack, particularly so during the suspenseful moments. Lenser Riccardo Pallottini was no stranger to the genre; he would later photograph the Gordon Scott movie "Samson and the Seven Miracles of the World" as well as the Gordon Mitchell peplum "Atlas Against the Cyclops." Chelo Alonso makes a villainous queen and her scene where she throws herself to the crocodile rather than being "branded to ashes" is neat.

    “Goliath and the Barbarians” director Carlo Campogalliani’s “Son of Samson” ranks as an above-average peplum about palace intrigue in 11th century BC Egypt, with beefy Mark Forest as Maciste flexing his oily pectorals and biceps in several displays of monumental strength as he topples a tyrant and sets enslaved men and women free. Our hero’s hand-to-hand combat scenes with a lion and a crocodile are far from convincing. Mind you, the fight with the lion tops the ephemeral water struggle with an ersatz looking crocodile. Nevertheless, the exotic setting of Egypt with its historic pyramids, our hero’s brawls with the Queen’s army, a stone cell that nearly crushes him, the obelisk erection scene, a supernatural necklace, and a minor surprise or two make this sword and sandal saga a better-than-average entry. Campogalliani and scenarists Oreste Biancoli of "Atlas Against the Cyclops" and Ennio De Concini of Romulus and Remus don’t deviate from the usual formula. The Queen is treacherous beyond comparison and she tries to enchant our brawny champion. Of course, everybody here including Brooklyn born Lou Degni has been dubbed but that’s part of the charm of these Italian produced spectacles. Surprisingly, the violence appear rather graphic with weapons piercing bodies and bright red blood splashed across the bodies. "Hercules vs. the Hydra” composer Carlo Innocenzi contributes an atmospheric orchestral soundtrack, particularly so during the suspenseful moments. Lenser Riccardo Pallottini was no stranger to the genre; he would later photograph the Gordon Scott movie "Samson and the Seven Miracles of the World" as well as the Gordon Mitchell peplum "Atlas Against the Cyclops." Chelo Alonso makes a villainous queen and her scene where she throws herself to the crocodile rather than being "branded to ashes" is neat.

  • Apr 27, 2018

    Good movie if you're involved in something else and need moving wallpaper. Obviously much was shot in Egypt. The dubbing was pretty awful but it sort of matched the soundtrack and scene transition. Don't go out of your way for this one. Yet, if you want an old school Italian historical flick, there probably aren't many better.

    Good movie if you're involved in something else and need moving wallpaper. Obviously much was shot in Egypt. The dubbing was pretty awful but it sort of matched the soundtrack and scene transition. Don't go out of your way for this one. Yet, if you want an old school Italian historical flick, there probably aren't many better.