Souvenir Reviews

  • Feb 21, 2019

    Always a pleasure to watch the amazing Isabelle Huppert on screen. But the storyline never really rang true to me here. As I see it, the film is watchable but I wasn't able to buy in to the characters or the premise.

    Always a pleasure to watch the amazing Isabelle Huppert on screen. But the storyline never really rang true to me here. As I see it, the film is watchable but I wasn't able to buy in to the characters or the premise.

  • Jun 26, 2017

    Delightful film. A sweet fairy tale with excellent performances from central characters. Old fashioned, yes, but a refreshing change from the multi-plex mediocrity on offer these days.

    Delightful film. A sweet fairy tale with excellent performances from central characters. Old fashioned, yes, but a refreshing change from the multi-plex mediocrity on offer these days.

  • Oct 11, 2016

    A singer who competed for Belgium in the Eurovision Song Contest the year Abba won is now working in a paté factory and lives in quiet obscure solitude when she meets a (much younger) boxer who recognized her. From this very Brit-rom-com premise, comes this intermittently amusing but ultimately slight film. The best thing here is the illuminating presence of Isabelle Huppert. Her Lilliane's transformation from a stoic existence to one that is filled with love and new opportunities at a later stage of her life is nuanced and enchanting. Equally impressive is the music by Pink Martini and it is a total challenge not to hum those earworm-like tunes as one leaves the cinema. However, broad plotting that lumbers from one scenario to another until a conventional and convenient resolution fails to generate natural drama for the film. An undemanding watch but not totally unlikeable, if nothing else, this answers the question: if we make a Britcom in French would it make it any better? Je dis Non.

    A singer who competed for Belgium in the Eurovision Song Contest the year Abba won is now working in a paté factory and lives in quiet obscure solitude when she meets a (much younger) boxer who recognized her. From this very Brit-rom-com premise, comes this intermittently amusing but ultimately slight film. The best thing here is the illuminating presence of Isabelle Huppert. Her Lilliane's transformation from a stoic existence to one that is filled with love and new opportunities at a later stage of her life is nuanced and enchanting. Equally impressive is the music by Pink Martini and it is a total challenge not to hum those earworm-like tunes as one leaves the cinema. However, broad plotting that lumbers from one scenario to another until a conventional and convenient resolution fails to generate natural drama for the film. An undemanding watch but not totally unlikeable, if nothing else, this answers the question: if we make a Britcom in French would it make it any better? Je dis Non.