Speedy - Movie Reviews - Rotten Tomatoes

Speedy Reviews

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June 18, 2016
An enjoyable visual treat of a movie if perhaps a little too long. Stuffed full to the brim with gags, action and romance, Lloyd brought his silent film-making era to a stylish, entertaining conclusion.
May 15, 2016
Old time Coney Island, great chase through New York ztreetz
Super Reviewer
December 31, 2015
Speedy is another Harold Lloyd silent comedy recently restored in 4K by the folks at The Criterion Collection for their Blu-ray release. They have done a wonderful job here and Speedy makes for an excellent companion piece to their previous Lloyd output of Safety Last! (1923) and The Freshman (1925). For a film that is turning 88 years old tomorrow, Speedy is a beautifully restored piece and in wonderful condition considering its age, what a revelation to watch!
Lloyd delivers another top notch comedic adventure here as the title character 'Speedy', who has a real hard time keeping a job or doing anything resembling a good job. The film is once again filled with great gags, hilarious set pieces, and perfect timing on the part of Lloyd and his interactions with the environment around him. Like most silent comedies there is a basic story here and a love interest for the title character, as well as several secondary characters who support Lloyd's character throughout his crazy antics. There are a couple huge set pieces with dozens and dozens of actors in them and it really adds to the scope of the film and makes for a wonderfully exciting spectacle.
Overall, this was a wonderful feature length Harold Lloyd film and also his last silent film. There are many scenes that bring both smiles and laughs to the audience through the clever use of the setting and elements within it and his character's energy and persistence within this crazy series of events. Once again, like the first two feature length Lloyd films mentioned earlier, Speedy was a true feature length comedy from one of the masters of the silent era and truly a wonderfully fun watch even 88 years after its release. What a gift for film lovers and those who appreciate silent films and comedy in general.
½ December 15, 2015
A heartless conglomerate is seeking to shut down the last horse-drawn trolley in New York City, but Speedy (Harold Lloyd) won't let them undersell its proprietor without a fight. This movie's sequence of misadventures include a hypnotic trip to Coney Island's Luna Park, a cameo by Babe Ruth, plenty of traffic mayhem, and a posse of geriatric Civil War vets who tackle the bad guys with clubs, a hot iron, and even a peg leg improvised into a shank. Harold Lloyd was arguably the biggest star in Hollywood when he began working on this continuation of the stunts, bizarre similes, and physical comedy found in preceding hits like The Freshman, Grandma's Boy, and Safety Last. The advent of talkies (as well as the Great Depression) quickly made Lloyd's "Glasses Character" into a quaint relic of the Roaring Twenties, but Speedy serves as a vigorous and entertaining finale to its leading man's peak at the cultural zeitgeist.
June 4, 2015
I've never loved Harold Lloyd the way I love Charlie Chaplin and Buster Keaton. I've tried, but his are just missing that certain spark that makes me cry when the Little Tramp is betrayed in The Gold Rush or laugh hysterically when Buster gets caught in a gang fight in The Cameraman. Still, he's made some great movies, and Speedy is one of them. To start, you can't talk about this movie without mentioned Harold's true partner, New York City. Speedy works just as well as a look back in time as it does a comedy, and anyone who is curious about the big apple during the 20's should put this on their watchlist as soon as possible. Witnessing Luna Park at night and the stands at Yankee stadium as they really were is worth the price of admission themselves, but my personal favorite part of this time capsule is the Coney Island rides. Those things were dangerous! Makes you wonder how many were injured riding them, but also at the same time it's hard to not want to ride some. Also we get a true guest appearance, Babe Ruth as himself, who learns that when you tell a cab to go fast, they go fast the hard way. All of this would make Speedy fun to watch even if it wasn't funny, but thankfully it's that too. Instead of a straight forward plot Speedy has basically a series of two reel shorts, and with that helps bring out Harold Lloyd's best straight up comedy to the surface. There's plenty of great moments here, from the previously mentioned Babe Ruth cab ride to a battle between gangs and ex-Civil War soldiers, there's never a dull moment. Also Speedy is thankfully lacking in the "thinks other are laughing with him, but are actually laughing at him" gags that bring down some other Harold Lloyd films, especially The Freshman. These jokes can be funny, but usually make you feel bad for whoever is at the end of them, so the absence of them here is welcome, as there's no doubt they would slow down the laughter. In the end, while it's not like one of Chaplin's or Keaton's masterpieces, Speedy is still a silent film that's worthy of the praise, and the dual role of historical piece and comedy make it a unique classic that shouldn't be missed.
April 28, 2014
This is easily one of the very best movies I've seen recently and I highly recommend it. Just hilarious! Babe Ruth appears as himself in a cameo playing a victim of Speedy's reckless driving. It was shot on location in New York City, and for lovers of the city and its history the film provides a very revealing portrait of what it looked like in the late 20's.
This is just about as fun and joyous as movies get. Definitely a must see!
Super Reviewer
April 1, 2014
At the end of the silent era, we have this gem to bring it to a close. Speedy uses the genre to its fullest impact by giving us plenty of interesting visuals and an entertaining plot line.
January 26, 2014
ny plays a character in lloyd's last silent film
May 26, 2013
Not only is it funnier than most movies, it has better car chases too!
½ February 14, 2012
68%/6.8 (i know that I rated it a 70%, it's closer than 60)

A fairly large majority of the humor is dated and not so much laugh-out-loud funny as it is smile-cracking funny. As a result, a majority of the conflict within the story as well feels more distressing than humorous, and it rather disturbs the experience. Despite all this, Harold Lloyd is a delight, and there are some brilliant scenes that are almost worth watching the film for, such as the cameo of Babe Ruth, the brawl with all of the old-timers, and the chase scenes. But the emphasis is on the "almost." It's not really a bad movie, if you can appreciate the humor, you'll enjoy yourself, but If you're like me, and have trouble swallowing certain brands of silent humor (i.e. non-Charlie-Chaplin), you will find the experience boring and uninteresting.
July 14, 2011
There are some of the funniest scenes in this movie, real classics. Especially the fight scene with the old civil war veterans...pure genius!
July 10, 2011
Watched after an introduction to Harold Lloyd through "Safety Last!", this was very enjoyable if not quite up to the same standard. Some of the jokes in this are priceless (the crab is very funny), and it's a great silent comedy in it's own right.
½ November 30, 2010
Thin story has some great gags and a walloping climactic chase.
November 12, 2010
"Speedy" is one of my favorite silent films. I always enjoy watching this breezy little film, first the gags are very funny and the film has a sweet love story at the center...secondly, we get to see New York in the 1920's! It was especially fun seeing Coney Island..all the rides that people were going on were quite eye opening. It's like being transported back in time, the film is a piece of history in that sense. Thirdly, we get to see Babe Ruth! How many films have Babe Ruth in them?! It's a very funny scene too..when he makes the mistake of getting into Harold Lloyd's taxi, one of the most memorable scenes in the film for sure. I would reccommend this film as a good introduction into silent films because it is such a fun film to watch, anyone can enjoy this film. Even my mom who has never seen a silent film before, was surprised by how much she liked it. The language the film speaks is universal..that's the one thing that makes silent films stand out even today-the actors didn't need to speak. They conveyed everything through facial expressions and body language. Anyone from any country can understand what is happening onscreen. What i love about silent films is the simplicity. It's human emotion shown with in such a simple manner, for instance in this film..Harold and his girlfriend are shown to hitch a ride in the back of a truck after he loses all his money. Through their gestures they convey their feelings for eachother and how they want to get married ..they move some things around, they make a little room showcasing what their home would be like. It was such a simple thing but speaks a univeral message. No sound was needed to get that message across. It was just so sweet and tender, silent films just have the tendecy to touch your heart like that and this film is no exception.
½ July 29, 2010
Harold Lloyd's final silent feature offers a glimpse at New York City dating back to the 1920s. Lloyd plays an aimless young man who goes from job to job (some misfortune always strikes, causing his unemployment), while working towards the opportunity to marry his girlfriend. His girlfriend's granddad is the owner of the city's last horse-drawn trolley car, although recently there have been attempts to buy him out. The movie has a fairly standard plot for a silent film: the hero saving the girl and her family's farm/business from the evil banker, but Lloyd brings his own unique perspective to it. Highlights include a trip to Coney Island's "Luna Park" (closed now since 1944), a trolley car chase through old Manhattan, and of course the appearance of baseball legend Babe Ruth. A movie visit to Coney island wouldn't be this enchanting again until "The Little Fugitive". "The Witching Waves" were particularly interesting (how'd they get the floor to do that?), and I enjoyed Lloyd's interation with the stray dog that follows him about Luna Park. Cute and fun.
Mr Awesome
Super Reviewer
½ July 29, 2010
Harold Lloyd's final silent feature offers a glimpse at New York City dating back to the 1920s. Lloyd plays an aimless young man who goes from job to job (some misfortune always strikes, causing his unemployment), while working towards the opportunity to marry his girlfriend. His girlfriend's granddad is the owner of the city's last horse-drawn trolley car, although recently there have been attempts to buy him out. The movie has a fairly standard plot for a silent film: the hero saving the girl and her family's farm/business from the evil banker, but Lloyd brings his own unique perspective to it. Highlights include a trip to Coney Island's "Luna Park" (closed now since 1944), a trolley car chase through old Manhattan, and of course the appearance of baseball legend Babe Ruth. A movie visit to Coney island wouldn't be this enchanting again until "The Little Fugitive". "The Witching Waves" were particularly interesting (how'd they get the floor to do that?), and I enjoyed Lloyd's interation with the stray dog that follows him about Luna Park. Cute and fun.
July 20, 2010
Springy little silent comedy, set against the backdrop of beautifully rendered New York City (seemingly unaffected by the Depression) with Lloyd at his creative peak.
Super Reviewer
July 11, 2010
Another 86 minutes of wild antics with Harold Lloyd.

There is a loose story about Harold's -- called Harold "Speedy" Swift here -- fiancee's grandfather's milk delivery wagon and a plot by an unscrupulous railroad tycoon to put him out of business. But none of that really matters. Any Harold Lloyd film's main appeal is the action, and this one is no exception. There are sight gags, car chases, a street fight, comic misunderstandings during a trip to Coney Island, and a hilarious bit in which Babe Ruth -- yep, THAT Babe Ruth -- is riding in cabdriver/baseball fanatic Speedy's cab. Speedy is so excited that the Babe is in his cab that he turns around in his seat to gawk and talk, oblivious in his excitement to the chaos his inattention and erratic driving is causing on the streets of New York City. Much of the outdoor action was filmed on location, and there is some wonderful footage of NYC as it looked in the 1920s.

As always, everything works out happily in the end for Harold and company. This is a fun movie with some heart suitable for the whole family....except -- am I the only one who's noticed that Speedy flips himself the bird in a funhouse mirror at Coney Island? I had to run the film back 4 times to review the scene and to make sure I saw what I thought I saw!
July 8, 2010
great cast & more this is a unique look at NYC 90 years ago better than any news or doc footage from that time coney island at its peak-priceless!
November 15, 2009
a truly great silent comedy.....harold llyod is a genius his comic timing....also itz was nice seeing nyc in 28' changed a bit lol....but as film terrific!!!!!
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